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December 10, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1935

Goalie, Defense

Still

In Doubt For Opening

Hockey Game

--

Smith, Simpson
Beside Captain'i

Cage Squad Will Encounter First Real Test Saturday Night

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t '

Irving Shalek Not Sure
Of Starting- Saturday
Against London
Lowe Given Trial
Call For Freshmen Puck
Chasers Issued; Expect
Large Turnout
Still undecided about two positions
on the Varsity hockey team, Coach
Eddie Lowrey sent his charges
through a long dri~il on the Coliseum
ice last night in preparation for the
opening game of the season with
Loiidon Saturday evening.
The close rivalry for the defensive
post next to Captain Larry Davis is
still going on between Bob Simpson,
consistent Duluth sophomore, and
Bert Smith, flashy freshman star of
last year.
Lowrey Worried
The goalie's post, more than any-
thing else, was worrying Coach Low-
rey last night as he gave Reed Lowe
a trial in the nets. Irving Shalek, a
roston boy who had been improving
steadily since he came out for the
team this winter, has not performed
well in recent work-outs and Lowrey
is taking no chances of being caught
without a substitute goalie in the
event that Shalek failes to make the
grade.
Lowe was not particularly impres-
sive last night as the Wolverine for-
wards pressed in on him with a bar-
rage of shots, but he is perhaps a
little quicker than Shalek when it
comes to moving alertly in the nets
to meet the attacks of oncoming
sharpshooters.
Furnish Sticks
Lowrey said he would continue to
use both boys in the nightly prac-
tice sessions and let them get all the
practice they can before the London
encounter.
Simpson and Smith, likewise, will
continue to battle over the vacant de-
fensive post and whichever boy shows
the most between now and Saturday
will start.
A call for freshmen hockey play-
ers was made by Lowrey yesterday as
he asked all freshmen hockey men to
report at the Coliseum Friday at 6
p.m. Freshmen must bring all their
own equipment with the exception of
sticks which are furnished by the
University. About 80 men reported
last winter and the total is likely to
approach that figure again this year
Slice Yearling
Cage Squad T
29 Candidates
A freshly sliced Freshman basket-
ball squad of 24 men went through
its first afternoon practice at the
Intramural Sports Building yester-
day.
Coach Fisher said yesterday that
Thursday's cut would be the last large.
one but that the present squad would
be cut down to 18 or 20 men eventual-
ly.
Those remaining on the squad to
date are. Howard Bu, Ann Arbor;
Robert Dewitt, Detroit; Herbert Cis-
co, Detroit; Leslie McCreath, Lock-
Sport, N. Y.; Max Warnshaw, Dodge
City, Kansas; Leo Beebe, Dearborn;
Albert Monus, Youngstown, 0.; Lar-
ry Newton, Sterling, Col.; William
Edwards, Muskegon; Sam Hender-
son, Ft. Wayne, Ind.; Ben Weaver,I
Indianapolis, Ind.; and Hugh Hae-
meyer, Detroit.
Franklin Shull, Jr., Ann Arbor;+
Gray Nelson, Ann Arbor; Bob Mitch-
ell, Ann Arbor; Walter Peckinpaugh, 1

Cleveland, O.; John Nicholson, Elk-
hart, Ind.; Richard Long, Butler,
Ind.; Dan Smick, Hazel Park and
Vincent Valek, Holly; also remain on
the squad.
Edward Phillips, Jr., Bradford, Pa.;
Don Bagnetto, Superior, Wis.; Louis
Levine, Muskegon Heights; Walter
Hook, East Grand Rapids; Forrest
Jordon, Clare; Alix Loiko, Ham-
tramck; Fred Janke, Jackson; Clar-
ence Vandewater, Holland and Ed-
ward Stanton, Charleston, W. Va.
are among those still remaining. t

The HOT
STOVE
By BILL REED
ONE of the most interesting duals
of the year will take place in the
State-Michigan basketball game here
Saturday night with the meeting of
the state's two outstanding pivot
players, Maurice Buysee and John
Townsend.
Townsend, Michigan's sophomore
star, is by all odds the greatest pivot
man ever to play for the Wolverines
and Buysee, a junior who played but
one Varsity season, two years ago, is
the best in Spartan history and the
most publicized player central Mich-
igan has ever had.
The meeting will be one of two
great offensive players (not that
either neglects the- other depart-
ment of play, however), but a.
contrast in styles.
Buysee, six-feet, three inches tall,
is a product of Lansing St. Mary's
High School and has established a
reputation not only with Spartan
teams but as a star in amateur loops,
in which he played last winter. The
principal feature of Buysee's play is
a looping shot at the basket with his
left hand, and although blind, a shot
which rarely misses. With his rangi-
ness and his spectacular shot, Buysee
is an offensive threat of the most po-
tent variety.
Townsend, on the other hand, is
equally potent as an offensive threat,
but not as a scorer himself. His un-
canny ball handling and passing have
distinguished him as probably the
most outstanding "feeder" ever to
play on the Michigan floor. Six feet,
five, he will have an advantage on
Buysee in physical proportions and
in polish, and will have an added ad-
vantage in the effectiveness of his
teaming with his brother Earle.
The infiuence of the notorious
three-second rule will be felt
more by Buysee than by Town-
send, as the former is largely de-
pendent on an advantageous po-
sition'which is naturallywithin
the restricted area. The big Spar-
tan, called "Rubber Arms" by his
teammates, has played in two
games with State this year, and
Friday night against Wisconsin
was held scoreless for the first
time iin his collegiate career.
The three-second rule was general-
ly conceded as handicapping him, as
he scored but nine points against
Albion in State's opener. Defensively,
however, Buysee remains effective as
he outpointed his Albion opponent
and held his Badger opponent score-
less also.
Although Michigan cannot neglect
the offensive abilities of the rest of
the Spartan team, especially the
flashy Ron Garlock at guard, its de-
fense for the State game will be di-
rected principally toward - holding
down Buysee. And the method em-
ployed will be simply to keep the ball
away from him, a plan made possible
by the Michigan height advartage.
Moscrip May Not Play
In 1936 Rose Bowl Tilt
PALO ALTO, Calif., Dec. 9.-(.4)--
Accorded an even chance of play-
ing football in the ose Bowl, Monk
Moscrip, Stanford end who sustained
a fractured jaw and dislocated knee
cartilages in the California game,
was given a pair of crutches and his
release from the hospital last week.
Whether the knee will stand the
pressure of actual competition will
remain unknown until the Indians
resume practice on Dec. 15. If Mos-
crip plays, he will wear a leather
mask over his law.

Cappon Drills
Varsity Hard
For State Tilt'
Gee's Knee Injury Gives
Reserves Opportunity To
Work With Varsity

i

Dive Of Dives And Six Champs
Will Feature Swimming Gala

.I

With John Gee on the bench with a
knee injury received at the opening
of the second half of the Michigan
Normal game last Saturday night,
Coach Cappon gave his reserves an
opportunity to work out with the Var-
sity combination in an offensive drill
in preparation for Michigan's first
real test against Michigan State Sat-
urday night at Yost Field House.
Gee Plays Safe
Gee's injury is not serious Ray
Roberts, trainer, said and the big cen-
ter will be scrimmaging again today.
He was kept out of practice yester-
day, Roberts said, just to play safe.
John Jablonski and Matt Patenel-
li, both regulars last year, played the
vacated pivot position and both
showed up well. Patanelli's style of
passing, which resemble that of the
Townsend brothers, worked well with
the first team formations.
Cappon also tried Earl Meyers, an-
other regular in 1935, in Capt. Chelso
Tomagno's guard post and Herm
Fishman, sophomore, in George Rud-
ness' position at the other guard.
The Varsity was hampered by pas-
sing too well, if such is possible, and
passed up open shots, prefering to
let the next man take the shot.
Passes Too Much
The responsibility for this malady
can probably be put on the shoulders
of the Townsends, principally John's.
They handle the ball as well as any
cagers Michigan has ever had and
seem to get real enjoyment out of
passing with the result that they keep
on passing despite openings.
Cappon got little additional infor-
mation on his Varsity quintet from
the Normal game for the team, using'
its superior height to excellent ad-
vantage, scored with ease and con-
trolled the ball, giving the Hurons lit-
tle chance to test their defense. When
the Teachers did try to score they
were unable to pierce the Wolverine
strict man-to-man defense.
Cardinals Release
old Bob O'Farrell
ST. LOUIS, Dec. 9.- (A) - Catcher
Bob O'Farrell, who helped the St.
Louis Cardinals win a pennant in
1926, managed the team in 1927 and
returned last year as third string
catcher, today was given his uncon-
ditional release.
Branch Rickey made the announce-
ment but did not elaborate on the
release of the man who in 1926 was
voted the most valuable player in the
National League.
O'Farrell remained with the club
through 1933. He was sold to the
Cincinnati Reds and appointed man-
ager of the Reds for 1934. Deposed
there as manager, he was sold to
the Chicago Cubs for the remainder
of the 1934 campaign, after which he
was released and signed by the Cards.

By GEORGE J. ANDROS
A dive never before attempted any-
where and the presence of six na-
tional spring-board champions will be
two of the features of the Olympic
Preparation Swimming Gala to be
held Friday, Dec. 13 in the Intra-
mural Pool.
Ben Grady and Der Johnston will
do a double-two-and-a-half forward
somersault off the high board. In
this dive, both performers take off
from one board at the same time,
spin through the air together, and
enter the water side by side. There
is no record of any team of double
divers ever having succeeded in doing
this difficult dive, but Johnson
and Grady have been doing it all
week in practice with perfect suc-
cess.
Many Champions
The above mentioned members of
Coach Matt Mann's Varsity squad,
along with teammates Ned Diefen-
dorf and Capt. Frank Fehsenfeld are
former National Junior A.A.U. diving
champions. Capt. Fehsenfeld is also
the present holder of the National
Collegiate high and low-board titles.
. Two other divers who will perform
are at present national champions.
Dick Degener, who holds three Na-
tional Senior A.A.U. titles and is rec-
ognized as the world's premier diver
of all time, and Hal Benham, pres-
ent National Junior A.A.U. cham-
pion from the Indianapolis A.C., will
also be on hand togtake part in
the huge show. Degener was Na-
tional Collegiate champion from
Michigan in 1933 and 1934.
Dick Papenguth, former Wolverine
captain and at present coach of the
Indianapolis A. C. squad, and Adie

Ferstenfeld, Varsity performer, will
complete the list of spring-board art-
ists who will show their wares.
Puts On Comic Act
Papenguth will put on a comic
act that rates as one of the best.
Capt. Fehsenfeld is one of his pupils,
and won -the National Junior title
under him while a student at Short-
ridge High School in Indianapolis.
Each diver in this gallant array
of stars will give the audience a taste
of the orthodox dives that gained
him national honors, and several
comic interludes have been planned in
the way of individual performances
and elaborate acts.
Diefendorf will of course do his
"Coca-Cola" dive; Fehsenfeld, the
"Indiana Slip"; Grady, the "Cannon-
ball"; and Ferstenfeld, the "Around-
the-corner Susie" dive.

s!
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Other Information
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I

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ALovely Chrilstma Gift
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MICHIGAN CALENDAR
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Don't fail to take one home with you-
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It is estimated that during the
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GRID JINX

Syracuse hasn't won a football
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has never been able to conquer one of
Coach Andy Kerr's creations.

~.1
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* The "GIFT SUGGESTIONS"
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The 1936
Michiganensian
Your University Yearbook
Will Cost You More
Later....
You Will Want This Pioneer
Among Yearbooks.
CAMPUS SALE

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