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December 08, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1935

E. Ludwig Will
Speak Next In
,ture Series
Topic Of Talk By Noted
Biographer Is 'Europe-
71914 To 194Q'
rmit Ludwig, said to be one of the
oiftstanding biographers of modern
times, whose works have been trans-
latd into 25 languages throughout
}word, will speak Thursday at Hill
tuitorium under the auspices of the
ratorical Association.
udwig has taken the comprehen-
s4ubject, "The Fate of Europe -
l to x.940,", to consider in his lec-
tre. His intimate relations with
Aluropean dictators and leaders in
diplomatic affairs, together with the
ob ectivity attained through his po-
s frin as a neutral observer, should
n4e udwig to speak authoritative-
ly on this topic.
Creator of such famous biographies
as "Napoleon," "Bismarck," "Lin-
coln," "Beethoven," "Goethe,'' and
' 1ter Meinschensohn" (his study of
th life of Christ), Ludwig's most re-
cent books to achieve international
recognition arehis "Leaders of Eu-
rope" and "talks With Mussolini."
,udwig is the unquestioned leader
of a new school of biographica writ-
ers, who lay stress on psycho-analy-
tical methods in studying the lives
of great men and women. His "Die
,Entlassung," dramatizing the first
authentic account of Bismarck's dis-
missal by the German emperor, pub-
lished during the war, marked Lud-
Wig's first rise to international prom-
inence and his first important at-
tempt at psychological methods of
biography.
Ludwig's family name is Cohn, and
although a native of Germany, he
bias lived in Switzerland for the past
26 years. He was one of the many
Jo table German Jews who received
abuse at the instigation of the Nazi
government.
Originally intended by his parents
for a legal career, and having proved
a failure in a compromise field of ac-
tivity -the coal business-Ludwig
set out on a career of journalism and
play writing. He published 17 books
bepo~re the start of the World War,
pone of them creating much of an
imrpession, even in his natilve Ger-
many.
It was not until the end of the
war, and his emergence as a writer
7 biography, that Ludwig became no-
.ced in literary circles of Europe,
and despite severe criticisms of his
style and method of writing he rose
to, his present position of pre-emi-
pence in biography in the space of a
w' years.
,No advance in the regular price
o ickets will be made for Ludwig's
eture and they may be secured from
. ahr's State Street bookstore.
AQ Ban Has
Been Of Benefit
To Universi ty
(Continued from Page I)
e to the campus and its activi-
.,A very small group," he said, "is
iyen permission to leave the campus
hweek-ends, and then only in cases
f very important business or family
airs." Many freshmen, he said,
Id like to go home on almost every
week-end, and keeping them at school
develops the independence which is
necessary in later years.

He pointed out that the ruling has
caused no noticeable change in the,
registration qf new freshmen. The
numnber of those who do not enter
the University, he said, because of the
ruling is' balanced by those who are
sent by their parents because of the
auto ban.
In announcing the new ruling to
the Board of Regents in his report,
P~resident Ruthven stated that one of
the purposes of the drastic step was
the moral betterment of the student I
body. That it has succeded in this
end has been clearly demonstrated.
At the recent convention of Social
Workers in Ann Arbor, it was pointed
out 'that the birth-rate among un-
married university students has been#
cut down by more than 75 percent.
Other effects of the "ban" have
been to decrease traffic in Ann Arbor,
to increase attendance at University
affairs and to increase the circula-
t6i of books in the general library,
all of which seems to indicate that
it has more than succeeded in its
purpose, and has been an advantage
to the student body, instead of a
dIetriment, as was originally expected.

Attacks Kansas Law

Proposed Tax
Brings Rush In
New Donations
$60,000,000 In Stocks Is
Given Away Within Four
Mlonths, SEC Reports
WASHINGTON, Dec. 7. -(/P) -
That President Roosevelt's proposal
for higher gift taxes inspired a wave
of donations was further indicated
today. A check-up showed stock gifts
dlone of $60,000,000 in four months.
This included only gifts by certain
corporation officers and large stock-
holders in the first four months after
the President's message to Congress.
The new rates passed by Congress
do not become effective until January.
Tax experts said the sum so far
disclosed is probably only an indica-
tion of the trend, and that when all
other gifts are reported in next year's
returns the $60,000,000 may look
small.
Statistics on the gifts were gath-
ered from reports to the securities
and exchange commission for the
period from June 19, when the Presi-
dent delivered his surprise message,
through part of October. No later
reports have been named available.
The total included some gifts which
may well have been planned long
before the President's message.

Commuting Service
Will Be Discussed
In a meeting of the transportation
committee of the Ann Arbor Cham-
ber of Commerce yesterday, it was
decided to confer with Mr. Danhoff,l
attorney for the Michigan Central
Railroad, in an effort to continue the
present commuting service to De-
troit. The railroad recently an-
nounced its intention of discontinu-
ing the service Dec. 16.
Joseph Hooper, a member of the
committee, stated that in view of the
number of residents who had re-
cently moved here and to Ypsilanti,
and the number of passengers that
used the special coach every morn-
ing, that the chamber had a good
chance to persuade the railroad tol
continue running the gasoline-pow-
ered coach.
The committee hopes to secure the
aid of Ypsilanti commuters in oppos-
ing the change, as many of the pas-
sengers live in that city.
Fight Over Curfew
Is Seen By Official
LANSING, Dc. 7. - (/P) - Liquor
Control Commissioner Frank E.
Gorman said today a conflict be-,
twen outstate forces opposed to a 1
a.m. curfew on the sale of beer and
liquor and the faction that favors
the early closing will flare into the
open within the next fortnight.
The commissioner said he has in-
formation that operators of drink-
ing places in every county of the
state are conducting meetings prep-
aratory to a concerted attack on the
early curfew. He said the informa-
tion comes from the operators them-
selves.
On the other shand, Gorman con-
tinued, temperance forces who be-
lieve a mandatory 1 a.m. closing hour
provides ample time for drinking are
massing quietly to combat the operat-
ors.
CAIRO IN CIVIL WAR
CAIRO.- (P) -One thousand stu-
dents of Cairo university fought aI
rock and club battle with police for
half an hour at Giza bridge today be-

Classified Directory

N

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Pi Beta Phi sorority pin on
campus. Finder please return to
Edith Merickel. Phone 7526. 156
LOST: Small book concerning his-
tory of Congregational Church.
Louisa Sheldon, Kingsley Apart-
ments. Phone 2-2614. 153
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x1

NOTICES
STATIONERY: Printed with your
name and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9a
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
FOR RENT
FOR RENT. Large single room on
first floor. Private lavatory in room
1.109 Willard. 154
FOR GRADUATE student or instruc-
tor, beautifully furnished suite of
rooms in private family. Phone
9524. 147
ABANDON RESCUE PLANS J
CANBERRA, Australia.--4P)-Hope
for rescue of Sir Charles Kingsford-
Smith and his co-pilot, Tom Pethy-
bridge, lost on a projected flight from
England to Australia, was abandoned
officially today by the Australian gov-
ernment.

SAVE 20%
011
WATCHES
The TIMEr SHOP
1121 So. University Ave.

®

mee

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

darned.
Ix

-Associated Press Photo
Miss Lilie Knight (above), a
Kansas City attorney, who, in
pleading for liberty of a Negro serv-
ing a life sentence in Kansas prison
for chicken theft, sought to have
the Kansas supreme court hold the
state's habitual criminal act 'void.
There are 378 other convicts in the
state sentenced under the same
law.

WANTED
WANTED: Galoshes with worn heels
to re-cap. College Shoe Repair
Shop. Call 6898. 152
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Tuxedo including vest.
Size 38. Hardly been worn. Will
practically give this away. Box
104. 157
' -- ' ' - "V "

k

L

Course In Education Is Offered
In 16 Centers Throughout State

Largely because of the success of
the plan last year, a field course in
education is being offered in various
centers of the state by the School
of Education in cooperation with the
University Extension Division.
The course being given is B195f,
State and National Trends in Edu-
cation, with special reference to the
curriculum of elementary and sec-
ondary schools. The centers chosen
for the presentation of this field study
are 16 in number anci are well scat-
tered throughout both the penin-
sulas so as to afford a good coverage
of the entire state. They include
Jackson, Kalamazoo, Grand Rapids,
Saginaw, Ann Arbor, Royal Oak,
Flint, Port Huron, Gaylord, Niles,
Ironwood, Newberry, Ishpeming,
Houghton, Iron Mountain, and Man-
istee.
Primarily intended for those per-
sons holding administrative and
supervisory positions in the field of
education, the course has been, upon
request, made open to teachers and
other qualified students who are
eligible to take graduate work. Upon
the fulfilment of certain require-
ments, credit for the work can be ob-
ta"ed. About 400 supervisors, prin-
cipals, superintendents and teachers
are now enrolled in the course.
The purpose of the course is to
answer the numerous questions being
asked at the present time by various
committees and boards throughout
the country in regard to school cur-
ricula. A critical examination is
made of the why and wherefore of
subjects on the present programs of

study and what new subjects should
be incorporated.
Those who took the field work last
year testified that this method has
four major attractions. It conserves
the time and effort of those desiring
to keep abreast of the more recent
trends and developments in educa-
tion; it provides for a closer tie-up
between educational theory and prac-
tice than is possible in the typical
course on a college campus; and it
creates an opportunity to profit by
the experience of others who are faced
with similar problems, and tends to
promote cooperative planning. The
course also stimulates a genuine de-
sire to grow professionally by work-
ing on the problems within one's own
school.
The following members of the ed-
ucation school's staff are giving the
course: Professors Francis D. Cur-
tis, Calvin O. Davis, Louis W. Keel-
er, Harlan C. Koch, Howard Y. Mc-
Clusky, William Clark Trow, Raleigh
Schorling, and Clifford Woody.
Important contributions in the or-
ganization of the course have been
made by Professors George Carroth-
ers, Stuart A. Courtis, Warren R.
Good, Edgar G. Johnston, and Wil-
lard C. Olson and Dean James H.
Edmonson.
MARSHICK IS CAPTURED
DETROIT. --(/P) - Prison guards
Friday night took into custody Ed-
ward Marshick, 33, just one day after
he had escaped from the State Prison
of Southern Michigan.

SERVICE
A PHILCO RADIO
would be an excellent
gift for the family

Gentle men
When considering a
GIFT, remember that
perfume is always ac-
ceptable. Ladies prefer
the better PERFUMES,
and that is the kind we
offer you. Let us aid
you in making a selec--
t 0o11.
We have a complete
stock of Ciro, Lucien,
Lelong, D'Orsay, Bal-
larde, Lentheric, and
luInut perfumes, as
well as other popular
and exclusive brands.

I

- Today, Monday and Tuesday -
JOE E. BROWN
"Bright Lights"
FRANCIS LEDERER
~Gay Deception"
"PLUTO'S JUDGMENT DAY"
Mickey Mouse Cartoon
-- Wednesday and Thursday
"ANNA KARENINA"
"HERE COMES COOKIE"'
Make Friends
With Y or
Coal Shovel
Feed your furnace BLUE
BEACON coal. You'll save
your shovel and yourself
a lot of extra work-fox 8
tons of BLUE BEACON go
as far as 10 of ordinary
coal.
'hone
4552
C ernwel
OAL
Read The Want Ads

fore they were

dispersed.

1.

i'

INSTRUCTIONS
Every forn of dancing.
Open 10 to 10. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695

this year.

Or if you

1111

Dial 4545
Al Day and Night
Taxi Service

do not get a i4ew one
this year, let us recon-
dition tle old one for
the holidays.
327 South Main Street
DIAL 7991"
III

Quarry
Incorporated

- _ __ __ _ .
.; ..

Campus Cabs

MICH IGAN
Now!

PRICES---
Sunday Matinee till 2 P.M. - 25c
Thereafter, All Seats - 35c
Shows Continuous Today 1 to 11

I

SHOWS CONTINUOUS
SUNDAY -- - 1 to 11 P.M
SUNDAY MATINEE
UNTIL 2 P.M. --- 25c
THEREAFTER - - - 35c
NOW

F

MAIESTIC
SH OWING-

11

"T HESE ARE THE BEST SEATS AT THE
OPERAUSYOD CAN HARDLY HEAR A THING!"
J

######C Z " #anggA rewnaag"
Imprinted with your name. One-day service.
1 2 Cards 75c and'up. 24 Cards $1.00 and up.
A large and choice assortment in a complete
range of prices.
0. aILL
314 South State Street
amammamnagee aamamnagwameamaasemramw ii

SHE WAS WILLING TO ABANDON
A GREAT CAREER AND THE
WORLD'S ACCLAIM .. .

t'

FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AND TRUST COMPANY
Established 1863
Oldest National Bank
In Michigan
Every Banking Service Available
Domestic - - - Foreign
STUDENT ACCOUNTS INVITED
Under U. S. Government Supervision
Member Federal Reserve System

See...'. ;;:
THIS PICTURE
WITH SOMEONE
YOU LOVEI f
HARRY M GOETZ
LING
Hear the- screen's' new-
est discovery, George
Houston, singing the
.'Toreodor"rsong from
'tCarmen".+ "

for the son they took
away from her ... the
son she fought for
like a tigress at bay!
A drama' tkat will
plumb, the depths of
your-emoiion and
make your heart cry
as no other story of
mother love has done
since "Stella Dallas"

_,

III

IF-
you haven't tried the
State
Shoe Repair

WH ITNI

EYc to 6 P.M.
25c after 6
NOW PLAYING-
urETT~ PAUL MUNI
ENIDY"

AL

V4[LO DY
HUGINON
John ,Holmdoy "-Mono Sorrta ele
Westtey " Lanro Hope CreWe3s
Wilvam Horrigon "David' Scott'
Wolter Kingsford, ferdinond Gotsholk
tE dword SmollProduc;lo'

EDWA0' EVE
"Hi) TON

i

11

III

I

III

U 1 .

_ __ t

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