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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 04, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIlE MUIITI~AN flATLY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4,

AAA Announces
New Four-Year
Cotton Ruling
Observers See Program As
Attempt For Permanent
Control Of Crops
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3. - (o) -
The AAA's determination to push for
longtime control of major crops de-
spite pending controversy over the
farm act's constitutionality was
emphasized today by publication of
a new, four-year cotton program. It
aims at production of 11,000,000 to
12,000,000 bales in 1936.
The AAA now has, in rapid suc-
cession, launched four-year control
programs for wheat, tobacco, rye and
cotton. A two-year contract has been
prepared for corn-hog producers.
Officials predicted some method of
continuing crop control would be
found, regardless of the supreme
court's ruling on the Agricultural Ad-
justment act.
The cotton contract provides for
a reduction in "base" acreage from
45,500,000 to 44,500,000 acres.
Contract signers will reduce ac-
reage 30 to 45 per cent, for 1936,
compared to 25 to 35 per cent for
1935 and 35 to 45 per cent for 1934.
One benefit payment will be made
at the rate of five cents a pound (ap-
proximately $8.60 an acre). Three
payments were provided in the 1935
contract on two bases, totaling 4 3/4
cents a pound.
Changes will be made in division of
benefit payments between landlords.
and tenants, allowing some tenants
more money. The person furnishing
the land will receive 37%2 per cent;
the provider of work stock and equip-
ment, 12/2 per cent, and the remain-
ing 50 per cent will be divided in the
proportion that the cotton or its'
proceeds are divided.
AAA Administrator Chester C.
Davis expressed belief the emergency
which resulted in the 1933 plow-up
has passed.
AAA Not Legal,
Cotton Industry
Claims In Brief
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3. - (') -
Charges that the Agricultural Ad-
justment Act is unconstitutional, nul-
lifies the division of power between
state and nation, and extends al-.
most unlimited Federal power over
local affairs were contained in a
brief filed today :n the Supreme
Court by the National Association
of Cotton Manufacturers.
The association acted as a friend
of the court, filing its analysis of
the AAA with the Supreme Court
in the Hoosac Mills case, in which
the circuit court at Boston had ruled
the processing taxes invalid.
Oral arguments are scheduled for
Dec. 9.
Summarizing, the brief asked: "Is
it too much to say that the issue
in this case involves the fundamental
right of the states to control their
internal . affairs, and the question
whether or not the Constitution gives
Congress power virtually to destroy
this authority?"
The greatest part of the 225-page
brief discusses the "general welfare
clause" of the Constitution, under
which the government asserts it has
power to carry out the AAA. The
brief contends the processing taxes
invalid on four counts.

Refrigerator Expert
To Address A.S.M.E.
The student branch of the Amer-
ican Society of Mechanical Engi-
neers will present as sneaker for ii
meeting at 7:30 p.m. today in the
Union, Be. E. Piffany., engineer of
the Kelvinator Corporation, Detroit.
Mr. Piffany will discuss different
types of refrigerants used in the in-
dustry today, and he will also con-
sider new developments in the field
of air conditioning.
After his talk Mr. Piffany will an-
swer any questions submitted by stu-
dents, and the meeting is open only
to mnembers of the A.S.M.E.

Cursed By King Tut?

-Associated Press Photo
Dr. James H. Breasted (above),
70, famed Egyptologist who ate and
slept in Tutankhamen's tomb and
scoffed at the so-called "curse"
upon vioatcis of the tomb, died in
a New Ycrk Hospital of a blood
tiansfusion. Hospital officials said
the aged archaeologist succumbed
to a "hemlytic streptoccic infec-
tion."
Isle Royalar
Subject Of Tall
By Wlhittemore
Landscape Expert Speaks
Over WJR On History Of
Famous Island
"Isle Royale as a National Park"
was described in a speech given by
Prof. H. O. Whittemore of the land-
scape design department, Director of
the Nichols Arboretum, yesterday over
the University Broadcast.
Discussing first the history of the
island, Professor Whittemore de-
scribed how in 1669 it was explored
by French voyageurs, and how it pos-
sibly was included on the American
side of the international boundary at
the insistence of Benjamin Franklin.
The Ojibway Indians ceded their
rights to Isle Royale as a hunting and
fishing ground, and the island was
bought by an English company for
mining operations, he pointed out.
Mining By 'Fire'
Mining in those days, Professor
Whittemore declared, consisted of
building "large fires on the rocks un-
til they were almost red hot, and
then cold water was dashed on to
crack and break them. The pure
native copper was then chipped free
by stone hammers and in turn ham-
mered into simple metal implements
and weapons."
"With the exception of a few fish-
ermen and others," Professor Whitte-
more added, "the island now went
back to the primitive." Natural
scientists, however, began to take
notice of it, and it began to be studied.
in 1904 and 1905 the University of
Michigan Museum expeditions under
the direction of Dr. Charles C. Adams
and others made a careful and sys-
tematic study of the plant and animal
life and the natural habitats.
Hoover Signs Bill
On March 4, 1931, President Hoov-
er signed the bill creating the Isle
Royale National Park, on the con-
dition that the lands needed were to
be secured and donated to the Na-
tional Government, Professor Whitte-
more explained. Since most of the
land was in the hands of timber and
mining companies, it was necessary
Ithat the United States government
break a longstanding tradition when
$750,000 was appropriated to bu
land, in order to pre vent despoliation
of the island for pulpwood, he said.
The establishment of the Isle Roy-
ale National Park will develop the
gateway cities at three points, Pro-
.essor Whittemore decared. Because
roads will not be built there, how-
ever, it is expected that the atten-
dance at Isle Royale will not be a
Imuch as at other parks, he added.

New Pipe Line
Approved For
Lansing Area
Administrative Board Must
Approve Act Of Utilities
Commission
LANSING, Nov. 3. - ( P) - The
state public utilities commission
agreed today to authorize the con-
struction by the Consumers Power
Co. of a $500,000 pipe line to serve:
Lansing and 26 surrounding com-
munities with natural gas.
The commission's decision is sub-
ject to the approval of the state ad-
ministrative board, which will con-
sider the matter in a special meeting
Wednesday.j
If accepted by the board the proj-
ect will be the first major extension
of the state's natural gas resources to
the central and southern part of
Michigan.
To Request Survey
The commission also agreed to re-
quest the federal bureau of mines to
conduct a survey to determine wheth-
er reserves warrant the extension of
pipe lines to other cities. It was esti-
mated the survey will.-take from one
to four months.
The action of the commission fol-
lowed an informal conference with
Gov. Fitzgerald and members of the
administrative board.
The governor said he is opopsed to
delay in the matter of bringing na-
tural gas to Michigan cities.
"The commission is assured of
enough natural gas to supply the
Lansing area for from 10 to 12 years,"
the governor said. "Construction of
the pipe line will provide work for
a number of men; it will give gas pro-
ducers an immediate outlet for their
product and will provide lower rates
for the consuming public in the affec-
ted area. With this assured start, a
federal survey then can be pushed to
determine what other pipe lines can
be constructed."
Large Supply Assured
Chairman William M. Smith of the
commission said there are assured,
reserves of 20,000,000,000 to 25,000,-
000,000 cubic feet of natural gas in
the Millbrook field fromswhich the
pipe line will draws it supply. He
said it will supplement the Bloomfield
field, from which the Consumers
Power Co. takes gas for Saginaw
valley communities.
The franchise to be granted the
company will not be exclusive insofar
as withdrawing gas from the Mill-
brook field is concerned, although
members of the commission said the
Consumers Power Co. has approxi-
mately half the gas in that field under
contract.
Aero Club To Hear
Talk By Springer,

Police Hold Jealous Slayer Of Husband

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-Associated Press Photo
Because the didn't believe in divorce and was afraid of losing him,
Mrs. Amy Dumbrell (abovel, 50, told police she shot her husband, 59-
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Scientist Rediscovers' Valuable
Relics In Grand Rapids Museum

Classified Directory

EDUCATOR DIES
TSINAN, Shantung Province,
China, Dec. 3.-(A)-Luella Miner,
74, American educator who devoted
all her life to China, died of pneu-
monia today.
She founded China's first college
for women, the women's college of
the Peiping university, in 1905. Until
recently she was dean of women in
Shantung Christian university.
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Griffin Calls Attention Tot
Indian Collection Long
Unnoticed
By WILLIAM SPALLER
A valuable collection of Indian
relics of the Hopewell culture that
had lain for years almost unnoticed1
in the Kent Scientific Museum att
Grand Rapids was virtually redis-
covered recently by James B. Grif-
fin, fellow in aboriginal North Amer-
ican ceramics of the Museum of An-
thropology of the University.
Griffin came across the collectionj
when he went to Grand Rapids to
take photographs of the pottery col-
lection there. Instead of the ordi-
nary relics which he expected to see,
he found that the collection repre-
sented the best group of Michiganj
Hopewell that is known to exist.
Are Unique Specimens
"The objects comprise an unusual
and in some ways perhaps unique ag-
gregation of Indian ornaments, tools,
pottery, and other specimens," he
said. "The group includes the best
and most valued examples of artisan-
ship of the long-extinct and little-'
understood Hopewell culture, a civil-
ization which is believed to have
flourished in mid-western states
about 800 years ago."
The collection, uncovered between
1870and 1890, has been in the pos-
session of the Kent Scientific Mu-
seum for more than 50 years, but its
value was not recognized until Grif-
fin inspected the findings and learned
that they surpassed in archeological
significance any similar collections in
the state and possibly in the country.
Collection Is Varied
The collection includes pottery,
platform pipes, copper, axes and awls,
Gulf-Coast shells, cut bear jaws used
as ornaments, perforated bear teeth
also used as ornaments, deer leg bones

that were split and used for awls, and
flint work. They are in excellent
condition and in larger quantity than
other collections.
"The relics are of great scientific
value because it is definitely known
where they are from," Griffin said.
"Part of the work of the ceramic de-
pository of the university is to try
to solve pre-white man history in
Michigan and the surrounding ter-
ritory."
Hopewell Farm Is In Ohio
"Evidence that certain semi-no-
madic tribes had attained a well-de-
fined state of advancement was first
discovered on the Hopewell farm in
Ross County, Ohio, in the 1890's"
Griffin stated. Numerous Indian
relics were found there which were
identified as an archaeological cul-
ture and exhibited at the Chicago
World's Fair in 1893.
Other findings in a more or less
useful state of preservation had come
to light occasionally previous to that
in Ross County, Griffin said, but not
in sufficient quantity to assume a
civilization. The relics in the Kent
Museum were an exception, however,
and that they were not identified
sooner in their relation to the Hope-
well culture was due partly to the
fact that they were "too well pre-
served."
WINS LIFE PASS TO SHOW
BOSTON, Dec. 3.--(P)-Herbert
L. Ohrenberger, of Dedham, thought
the picture was funny - and his
hearty laugh boomed out in a news
reel theater.
The rest of the patrons followed
suit.
Afterward the manager gave Oh-
renberger a life pass, saying he has
"the most infectious laugh and we
appreciate your being in the audi-
ence."

III

"NATURE'S HANDIWORK"
ODDITY -- NEWS
Coming Saturday
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Thrilling Song, Vibrant
Romance and Soul Stir-
ring Emotion!
JOSEPHINE
HUTCHINSON
GEORGE HOUSTON
in
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LINGERS ON"

'Today and Thursday
RICHARD E. BYRD'S
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and EDMUND LOWE in
"BLACK SHEEP"
- Friday - Saturday
GARY COOPER
"THE VIRGINIAN"
and MARGARET LINDSAY
"Personal Maid's Secret"
BUCK JONES
"ROARING WEST"
Chapter 1

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The costs of designing airplanes
will be discussed by B. L. Springer of
the aeronautical engineering depart-
ment at a meeting of the Aero Club
at 7:30 p.m. today in the Union.
Mr. Springer is faculty advisor for
the club, which is a branch of the
American Society of Mechanical En-
gineers. His talk will include a num-
ber of economic considerations which
must be taken into account during
the construction and design of air-
planes.
At the meeting opportunity will be
given to students attending to joinI
the Institute of Aeronautical Sci-
ences, Mr. Springer announced.
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MICHIGAN

ENDING TODAY

the St. Louis Post-Dispatch is almost
mnvariably recognized as one of the trul%
great liberal newspapers of America.
Many professors of journalism-im-
partial judges of newspaper merit - use
the Post-Dispatch in their classrooms as a
type of newspaper that combines complete.
intelligent news coverage with editorial
anaylsis of public questions that is notable
for liberalism and independence, forth-
rightness and clarity.
Sublscr4tnns may be Laced' with Mr. Wesley

H. B. WARNER
ONSLO W. STEVENS
MAXINE DOYLE
DI'%DML 7f% fA"AI AF

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ON STAGE a TOMORROW ON SCREEN

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