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November 27, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH~E MICHICXN T1XILY

'WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1935

Bromage Points Out How State
Government System Can Survive

University Broadcast Topic
Is 'Michigan Engineering
Achievements'
Prof. Lewis M. Gram of the civil
engineering department. speaking in
the "Michigan, My Michigan Series,"
which are broadcast every Tuesday
from the University broadcasting
studio, discussed the "Engineering
Achievements of Michigan," pointing
out Michigan's highways, and the De-
troit water supply system as out-
standing examples.
He also refered to the St. Mary's
Canal, The Michigan Central Tun-
nel, the Ambassador Bridge and the
Detroit-Windsor Bridge as illustra-
tions for his talk.
Praises Canal
Speaking of the St. Mary's Falls
Canal, Professor Gram said "this
canal has been of greater benefit di-
rectly and indirectly to the people in
our own state and in the world at
large than any other single engineer-
ing project." All the modern devices,
he explained, which have been pro-
moted by the mineral resources of
Michigan and neighboring states, are
brought to market at low cost through
this canal.
The canal, which connects Lakes
Superior and Huron, is made upof
two canals and many locks. The
history of its building, as described
by Professor Gram, began in 1837.
From that time on, it was built
"cautiously in piecemeal fashion,"
and is a result of 65 years of inter-
mittent construction. At first the
contractors and proponents had dif-
ficulties with the federal soldiers, and
also with Congress, but after action
was deferred for 13 years, public land
was appropriated for it.
'Bridge's Tonnage High
"As compared with other notable
canals in the world," Professor Gram
pointed out, "the tonnage passing
through the American and Canadian
canals in normal pre-depression years
was greater than that of the Kiel,
Panama and Suez canals combined."
The double-track tunnel of the
Michigan Central Railroad was be-
gun in 1906, after 50 years of agita-
tion and suggestions. At first it was
intended that a bridge span the De-
troit River, butaopposition of shipping
.interest, and the discovery of the use
of electric cars to avoid the ventila-
tion problem, brought about the tun-
nel's construction, Professor Gram
explained.
The Ambassador Bridge and the
Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, Professor
Gram asserted, were a result of the
need for avoiding the delays and haz-
ards of transportation over the De-
troit River. 'The bridge is of the so-
called suspension type, and it is sec-
ond only to the George Washington
bridge in length.

Three Issues Are Named'
By Michigan Professor;
In Providence Speech
PROVIDENCE, R. I., Nov' 26.-
Members of the National Municipal'
League assembled here for the first
day of their forty-first annual confer-
ence on government heard Prof. Ar-
thur W. Bromage of the political sci-
ence department of the University
of Michigan discuss mothods of reor-
ganizing state government in the
opening session Monday morning.
"The states can best assure their
,ontinued existence as component
parts of the Federal system by re-
viewing and reorganizing their gov-
ernment structure and administra-
Jive practices," Professor Bromage
said.
"The first of these issues simmers
down to the old question of Federal
centralization versus states' rights,"
said Professor Bromage. "On this
battleground three major alternatives
are open to the American people:
"First, to consoldate the state into
regional commonwealths, such as the
Commonwealth of New England.
"Second, to amend the Federal
Constitution by granting to the Fed-
eral government a national police
power to legislate for the health, safe-
ty, morals and general welfare of the
United States.
"Third, to muddle through in the
best Anglo-Saxon tradition, as we are
now doing, without creating regional
commonwealths or giving to the Fed-
eral government a new grant of con-
stitutional power.
"We cannot have the first policy
because the states will not turn the
Two Men Attempt
To Enter Sorority
Two men who attempted Monday
night to break into the Delta Gam-
ma sorority house, 1205 Hill St., were
frightened away by several members
of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity.
One of the Delts was conversing
with one of the Delta Gammas via
telephone when he heard her scream.
He and several of his cohorts rushed
over to the Delta Gamma house and
discovered the two intruders on the
roof. The Delts covered all visible
means of escape, but the two men
eluded their grasp.

knife upon themselves," Professor
Bromage said. "The second policy
might have carried in the abyss of the
economic crisis. To secure the rati-
fications of 36 states to new national
powers would probably be an insup-
erable task today. In following the
third policy, the national government
reaches out under its interstate com-
merce and taxing powers to attempt
regulation of industry, labor, and ag-
riculture. Through the use of the
Federal taxing power and Federal aid
we may be able to work out a new
order through Federal-State cooper-
ation, but formal readjustment of our
constitutional system seems a remote
possibility. As of old the Supreme
Court is the umpire of the Federal
system."
Prof. James A. B. Pollock of the
political science department spoke
on the subject, "Personnel Problems
in Michigan."
Prof. Robert S. Ford, also of the
economics department of the Uni-
versity, will address the session today
on "Michigan's Experience in Tax
Limitation."
Fresh Air Calmp Holds
Special Reunion Lunch
Camp Charlevoix, University of
Michigan Fresh Air Camp, held a re-
union luncheon recently in the Grand
Rapids Room of the League, enter-
taining 130 guests, the boys, their par-
ents, and the camp counselors. The
mothers were presented with corsages
of chrysanthemums. After luncheon,
plans were discussed for next summer
and a mid-winter reunion was
planned, as well as a winter camp
which will be held between Christmas
and New Year's at Patterson Lake.
The guests attended the game after
the luncheon.

Classified Directory
LOST AND FOUND LAUNDRY
GRAY DOUBLE-BREASTED over- STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
coat at Chubb's Saturday night. If reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
found, call Chubb's. Reward. 124 3006. 6x
COME ON, somebody, break down LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned
and return my topcoat to me. The Careful work at low price. lx
one I'm wearing now, borrowed T-CES __
from a roommate, doesn't have that NOTICES
individual flair. I might add that GE r
thepoic ae n hetril ad reTHANKSGIVING DINNER served
expecting an arrest within 24 hours. from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 at Mrs. J. L.
Telephone all clues to Whipple at Hampton's tea room. Also home
3652, 513 Jefferson, or The Daily. baked pastries and bread. 135
125

$500 GIFT REFUSED
HELENA, Mont., Nov. 26. - (P)-
A $500 gift from a liquor company-
to help finance a new church build-
ing-was turned down today by the
St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal
Church here.
The money was from a $3,100 sub-
scription by liquor companies for
SAV E 20%
by our
CHRISTMAS
LAY - A - WAY
PLAN
The TIME SHOP
1121 So. University Ave.

'

Wouldn't you like somc
Homegrown
Celery
for your Thanksgiving
Dinner? It's brittle and
sweet -and has that
nut flavor. Buy some at
FARM MARKET
320 East Liberty Phone 9778
Open Evenings and Sundays

rehabilitation in this quake-damaged

city.

i

LOST:eA white gold wrist watch with
white gold wrist band. Lost Fri-
day, perhaps at Hill Auditbrium.
Reward. Call 7233. 121
LOST: Sunday morning between 611
Packard and Masonic Temple a
Warwick wrist watch. Phone 7415.
Reward. 132
LOST: Last Thursday near campus,
brown tam and brown mitten.
Please call 5966. 133
LOST: A lady's silver and jade ring.
Just in front of Union. Call 4017.
126
HELP WANTED
GOOD ROOM, one block from cam-
pus in exchange for janitor work.
Call 3330. Day hours. 130
Liquor Consumption Is
Reported On Decrease
WASHINGTON, . .ov. 26.- (P) -
Treasury statisticians said today the
American public is consuming much
less legal liquor now than in the "wet-
test" pre-prohibition days.
They said consumption of distilled
spirits (hard liquor) is running about
64 per cent of the pre-prohibition
peak.

BOARD for four boysa
Division. $4.00 per
meals.

at 420 South
week for 13
127

4

WANTED
WANTED: Man to share apartment.
Call at 216 South Ingalls. Apt. 15,
from 6 to 7 p.m. 128
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointm'ents.
2-3640. lox
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Alto saxophone, Conn.
Cost $165. Good condition, sacri-
fice for $35 cash. Phone 2-2192.
129
Ia
Everlot Rooster
1 Step Automatic Control
Keeps Temperature Uniform
Prepare an entire meal
at one time.
$16.95
r
SCHLENKER
Hardware Company
213-215 W. Liberty Tel. 8575

---- - - --- . . .......... . .

* -O O IV
All you really need is your steady
job with a reliable company We'l
advance you up to $300, it you PE 5 hi A
can repay a small amount
monthly out of your income. Quick, FINANCEMPANY
private service. You have a choiceFC OMPANY
* of 6 other plans that will allow you
all the time you need to repay Second Floor - Wolverine Bldg.
Sas long as 20 months!Room 208 Phone 4000-4001
* ! * * 0 * * * * Cor. Washington & 4th

call
0
0

the beer vault
221 west huron
For Air-Cooled Kegs (of 1 to '/2 Barrels),
Cases, Bottles. Popular Brands $1.79 case.
"California and Michigan Wines"
10-minute delivery service
Phone 8200

a

A

LAST DAY -

I

F

Spe cial Today!
T TURKEY
SDINNER

Trill

D AYLIGHT DOES NOT
PROVIDE ENOUGH LIGHT
in most schoolrooms

Full Course.55C
PANCAKES
ALWAYS ON ORDER
Open 7:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M.
Table and Counter Service
Aunt Het's
513 East William

LOOK AT THE TWO PHOTOS BELOW FOR A MOMENT.

You can see how

quickly the daylight falls off after it enters the windows. And you can
see that even on bright, sunshiny days, the pupils on the side of the room
farthest from the windows don't get enough light to do their work with-

out straining their eyes.
do get enough light ...
should have between 20

But when the electric lights are turned on, they
if the lights are sufficiently bright. Every pupil
and 35 footcandles of light at his'desk.

Ends Tonight-
"THE DARK ANGEL" and
"DON'T BET ON BLONDES"
-- Thurs. - Fri. - Sat.

Ii

I

MICH IGAN

(Wednesday and Thursday Only)
TODAY and TOMORROW

I

I

I

The photo above shows how quickly daylight falls off as you get
from the windows. We have tried to illustrate this by putting a light

away
block

pattern above the desks - the thickness of the block at any point repre-
senting the amount of light on the several rows of seats. This picture was
taken on a bright, spring day. But notice how the light falls off from 90
footcandles on the row of seats nearest the window to only five footcandles
on the inner row of seats ... In the photo below, we have tried to show
how artificial lighting must help daylight, to save pupils from eyestrain
and nearsightedness. Notice how every student is given the same "seeing"
opportunity when the inner row of elecric lights is burned throughout
the day. On dark, cloudy days, both rows of lights should be burned.
Proper lighting means less effort in seeing -less strain on eyes, nerves
and body. It is just as necessary as proper glasses. Light and glasses are
good friends. Eyes should be examined every year.

I

Jack Benny (the funniest fellow on the
air or screen), Ted Healy (the dizziest
balloonist who ever broke a record),.
Nat Pendleton (a 'part-time "G" man
who never gets his man), Una Merkel
and Mary Carlisle-they're all together
in the season's most hilar-
ious escapade ! The sky's
Sthelimit for laughs!.
f RA~~ Al "

with T E D H E A LY
UNA MERKEL
NAT PENDLETON
MARY CARLISLE

.

.

.11 1 11 1 1 1 l* 1

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