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November 26, 1935 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

....... . ..... ......

Twenty-Six Winners Of Varsity Football Awards Ann

unced

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Largest Group
To Be Honored
In 20 Seasons
Five Seniors, 11 Juniors
And 10 Sophomores To
Be Presented Letters
Twenty-six members of the Mich-
igan football squad, the largest num-
ber to receive major grid awards in
the last two decades, were yesterday
announced as "M" winners by Coach
Harry G. Kipke.
OfHthe number five are seniors, 11
juniors and 10 sophomores, a fact that
hints at great strength in 1936. The
seniors are Capt. Bill Renner, John
Viergever, Mike Savage, Ernest John-
son and Steve Remias. It is the third
football "M" for both Savage and
Viergever.
Patanelli Plays Most
Kipke revealed that Matt Patanelli,
all-conference end, played a total of
472 minutes during the season out of
a possible 480. Renner was next with
419 minutes, and Bissell third with
406. Other leaders in point of time
played during the eight game sched-
All football letter winners are
requested by Coach Harry Kipke
to meet at the Renschler Studios at
noon today for the annual picture.
ule are Sweet, 397; Smithers, 359;
and Kramer, 337.
In 1934 25 awards were given and
12 of them to sophomores as opposed
to 1933 when only two sophomore let-
ters were given. It has been the cus-
tom during the past few years to
award less letters than were given this
year, the change coming about with
a greater number of substitutions this
fall due largely to the large number
of serious injuries Wolverines suf-
fered during the past campaign.
Captain To Be Announced
Next year's captain and manager,
succeeding Bill Renner and Dan Hul-
grave, will be announced at the Foot-
ball Smoker in the Michigan Union
tonight.
The complete list of letter winners:
Bill Renner, John Viergever, Mike
Savage, Ernest Johnson, Steve Rem-
ias, seniors; Vincent Aug, Frank Bis-
sell, Chris Everhardus, Jesse Garber,
Bud Hanshue, Earl Meyers, Matt Pat-
anelli, Ernest Pederson, Stanton
Schuman, Cedric Sweet and Harry
Wright, juniors; Bill Barclay, Bob
Campbell, Melvin Kramer, James Lin-
coln, Earle Luby, Joe Rinaldi, Stark
Ritchie, John Smithers, Solomon
Sobsey and Art Valpey, sophomores.
Rose Bowl Tough
For Stanford, But

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The HOT
STOVE

Lowrey Sends
Team Through9
I0rc t I D rll

Inability To Block And Tackle
Characterized 1935 Grid Team

D.D.'s RETAIN TITLE
The D.D.'s won their second
straight championship of the In-
tramural Independent Football
League yesterday when they de-
eated Joe's, 13-8.

ZEPP BEATS BECHTOLD
EAST LANSING-Bill Zepp, Mich-
igan State Normal veteran, wins Cen-
tral Intercollegiate cross-country title
in great race with Ed Bechtold, Mich-
igan State College's National Inter-
collegiate champion. Spartans win
team honors, Notre Dame second.

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- By BILL REED

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f)

F RANCIS SCHMIDT, whose "No
Mercy" has become "No Worry"
-for at least 10 days, has more
friends today than a sweepstakes win-
ner. The first to demonstrate his
great affection to the Buckeye mentor
was an inebriate who appeared on the
Ohio bench during the last quarter
of Saturday's game.
"You just can't love me like I
love you," he was able to assert,
with his arms around Schmidt's
neck, before a bevy of managers
hauled him away.
L. W. St. John. Ohio State director
of athletics, has his own opinion of
football "spies." In 1924, an alleged
fraternity brother of Coach George
Little told him that on the first play
afterthe kickoff, the Buckeyes would
shoot a long pass.
"Sure coach," was the Wolverine
answer to the last minute admoni-
tions of Little to his squad, but on the
third plav of the game, the pass camp
off - 40 yards for a touchdown.
First In War Department 1
A first grade teacher in Centralia,
Ill., showed her class a picture of Col.
Charles A. Lindbergh, saying:
Here is a young man you all
should know; who is it?"
The pupils chorused: "Spur-
geon." -Lowell Spurgeon, Illinois
halfback, whose home is in Cen-
tralia.
Cage Squad Is
Augmented By
Football Men
Coach Cappon Puts Team
Through First Afternoon
Drill In Field House C
The Michigan basketball squad
went through its first afternoon drill
of the season in Yost Field House
yesterday in preparation for the open-
ing game against Calvin College at
Grand Rapids next Monday.
Four members of the football team
reported for practice for the first'
time. They were Earl Meyers, letter-
winner and high scorer on last year's
team, Stark Ritchie, Chet Stabovitz,
and Joe Rinaldi. Mat Patanelli, also3
a regular last season, Chris Everhar-
dus, John Rieck, and Bill Barclay
will be in uniform before the week:
is over.I

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1 L XUe U111 By WILLIAM R. REED
One factor differentiated the 1934
and 1935 football seasons: Bill Ren-
Two Men Fight For Goalie ner. Otherwise the 1934 team showed
Post; Season To Open an astonishing similarity to its pre-j
P ; decessor in the tragic inability of its
Early In December personnel to perform effectively the
fundamentals of football-blocking
Indications that Michigan would and tackling.
have at least a good hockey team The presence of Renner gave the
this winter were further bolstered last team its one offensive threat and it
night when 18 men reported to j was most recognized as he personally

Coach Eddie Lowrey and wr u
through a lengthy scrimmage on the
Coliseum ice.
The goalie situation, a problem
which has been haunting Lowrey
since Johnny Jewell was forced out
of the line-up with an operation last
January, appeared partially solved.
Bill Chase, who finished the season
last winter, did not return to school
this fall and Lowrey was naturally
worried about a net guardian. Two
goalies stood out as capable perform-
ers in the initial work-out of the
year and Lowrey will have Irwin Sha-
lek and Gordon Bedford from whom
to choose when the team faces Mc-
Master University in the opening puck
contest of the year the first week
in December.
Hold Scrimmage
Lowrey lined up two teams to scrim-
mage after a brief warm-up drill and
the entire squad was worked into the
game as the session progressed.
On one team Coach Lowrey had
Shalek in goal, Captain Larry David
and Fritz Radford at defense, Dick
Griggs at center and Jack Merrill
and Gib James forwards. The other
starting six was made up of Bedford
in goal, Bob Simpson and Bert Smith
defensemen, Vic Heyliger center, and
Dick Berryman and John Fabello for-
wards.
The practice, typical of an early{
season workout, was marked by bad
passing and sloppy stick handling, but
the team showed all the earmarks of
becoming a good one.
Ineligibilities Hurt
With the ineligibility of Gib James
and Dick Griggs, both of whom
showed to advantage last night, Low-
rey must build his offense around
Berryman, Heyliger and Fabello. Fa-
bello should fit into the Wolverine
forward wall very nicely and teamed
with Heyliger and Berryman, both of
whom played on the first line last
winter, should give Michigan a fairly
good offense:
With Captain David holding down
the right defense position, Lowrey is
searching for another capable rear
guard. Bob Simpson, Fritz Radford,
and Bert Smith stand out as con-
tenders for the job and the opening
game will undoubtedly find one of
these boys back beside David. Rad-
ford and Simpson stood out during
last night's drill but Radford was
hampered by a bad knee.
Both Shalek and Bedford, while
still far from finished net perform-
ers, turned in satisfactory perform-
ances and at least one of these boys
should develop into a good goalie.
FROSH THINCLADS MEET
An informal meeting of the
freshman track squad and of all
first-year men interested in turn-
ing out for the squad will be held
at 4:30 p.m. today in the sec-
ond-floor locker rooms of Yost
Field House. Freshman Coach
Ken Doherty will outline plans
for the coming season and Varsity
Coach Chuck Hoyt and Captain
Frank Aikens will give short talks.

'led the way to four victories.
But the lack of ability in funda-
mentals characterized the entire sea-
son, and was but partially offset by
the factors of Renner and a fighting
spirit which carried on even against
the overwhelming power of teams
such as Ohio States and Minnesota.
Even in victory, against Indiana, Wis-
consin, Columbia and Pennsylvania,
the absence of proficiency in those
departments was noticeable.
Team Outplayed Fundamentally
In victory, except against Pennsly-
vania, the Wolverines found them-
selves outcharged and outplayed in
fundamentals and only an alertness
which took advantage of every break
and an ability to spread the oppon-
ent's defense with a dreaded aerial
attack gave Michigan its wins.
It was not that the Michigan team
had not been trained in fundamen-
tals, for the 1935 squad received more
intensive drilling in those depart-
ments than any other squad in a de-
cade, and fully twice as much as the
national championship teams of two
and three years ago. Nor was it that
the Wolverines did not have the plays,
for today Coach Kipke can show any
enquirer the very same plays that
Minesota used most effectively. The
only difference was blocking.
Defensively, the 1935 team did not
show an improvement over the 1934
squad which led Art Van Duren, one
of the most keen of Michigan sports
observers, to say "I've seen Michigan
teams which couldn't block, but this
is the first team I've seen which
couldn't tackle."
Matreial Was Lacking I
The whole answer seems to be that
the 1935 team, as it did in 1934,
lacked material. Collectively effec-
tive on occasion, individually the
squad members lacked prowess in the
two fundamentals. It was this fact
that occasioned Coach Kipke's re-
mark after the Minnesota game "I've
only one boy on my squad who could
make that team."
With a disastrous season past, the
focus is naturally upon next year, and
4 J .

particularly upon freshman and re-
serve players who will be called upon
to again put the Michigan system in
gear.
Particular emphasis will be placed
on the line next year, and more es-
pecially between the tackles. The
tackle posts, key to every defense,
wil lhave numerous candidates, in-
cluding four letter winners in Mel
Kramer, Earle Luby, Bud Hanshue
and Jim Lincoln. But the Wolverine
coaching staff, with freshman coach
Wallie Weber giving the key, will look
to a trio of freshmen, Fred Janke,
John Brennen and Frank Kasienski.
Veteran Guards Plentiful
At the guards, the material will!
present itself principally from mem-I
bers of the 1935 squad, including'
Frank Bissell, Stan Schumann, Ernie!
Pederson, Sol Sobsey, and Jesse Gar-
ber. Standout among the freshmen
this year was Ralph Heikkenen. Giv-
en an added year of experience, these
men may restore Wolverine hopes for
a strong offense with their blocking
play or a stonewall defense with their
line play on the defense.
At center, two standouts will return t
as lettermen, Harry Wright, although
classed as a defensive tackle, and Joe
Rinaldi, who showed himself a
worthy candidate for the important
post, despite a betrayal of his inex-
perience. Two freshmen, however,
will give Coach Kipke a strong center
under any circumstance -- John
Jordan and Howard Brandt.
Optimistic as are views of 1936 ma-
terial at this time, they are neces-
sarily so, for upon the players' natural
abilities rest hopes for a successful
season.
Football players are born, not made.
CHALLENGE WITHDRAWN
NEW YORK-Commodore of Royal
London Yacht Club withdraws chal-
lenge for an America cup series.
7000
-----b

Week-End Excursion
to C H ICAGO and
International Live Stock Exposition
Saturday, November 30
ROUND TRIP 5.00 Coaches Only
Good on trains leaving Ann Arbor at 8:10 A.M., 9:40 A.M.,
1:21 P.M., November 30th, scheduled to arrive Chicago
before 6:00 P.M.
Lv. Chicago not later than 1:30 a.m. (Cent. Time) Mon., Dec 2
Patrons who desire to drive to any cities from which excursion is
operated and take advantage thereof, may park cars on unused
railroad property to the extent available. Such parking shall be
at patron's risk. Ask Ticket Agent for information.
Avoid Highway Congestion - Travel Safely by Rail
MIC n-IGAN CENTRAL

SALE
STARTS
TODAY
Tues.,
I Nov.
26th

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A REAL

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Nov.
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i naans ome Iacki
BJ FRED DeLANO
It seems they just can't keep Stan-
ford out of the Rose Bowl.
S a t u r d a y "Tiny" Thornhill's
mighty Indians, out only for a bit of
gridiron pleasure and a crack at their
old rivals - the Golden Bears of
California - and not intent on inter-
fering with anyone's well being,
caused the year's biggest sensation on
the West Coast by beating the Bears,
13-0, and moving into the Bowl for
the third consecutive year.
California, undefeated and untied
through its first nine games, was un-
til about 4:30 (PST) Saturday after-
noon slated for the Rose Bowl affair.
Then the tables were turned, Stan-
ford had trimmed the Bears by two
touchdowns and a three way tie
(UCLA being the other team) existed
for the mythical coast championship.
UCLA, however, has not received
much consideration for the bid al-
though beaten only once. The in-
eligibility of Ted Key, star fullback
who was in the main responsible for
Stanford's lone defeat, marred its
record. Had California gone through
unscathed it would have been simply
a routine matter to give them the bid
but along came Thornhill's power-
house with Bobby Grayson at the
helm to smash the Bear's hopes and
figuratively stop the Bears just as
they were walking into the Bowl.
Official sanction on Stanford's
playing was given yesterday and now
comes the task of picking an oppon-
ent for the Redskins who have found
the Rose Bowl assignment the year's
toughest of late. In 1934 it was the
supposedly weak Columbia team that
upset the dope and won the gridiron
classic, 7-0, with Al Barabas account-
ing for the points. Then on New
Year's Day in 1935 an aerial display
that made the aurora borealis look
like the stars of a tank town vaude-
ville act was turned loose in the Bowl
with one Dixie Howell pitching strike
after strike to Don Hutson to give
Alabama a 29-12 win.
ZEH STAYS ON TOP
NEW YORK-Ray Zeh, Western
Reserve fnullhack wins nation's high-I

Two Combinations Used
Coach Cappon used two combina-
tions from which he will probably
select his first team. One of these
was composed of John and Earl
Townsend, John Gee, George Rud-
ness, and Capt. Chelso Tomagno.
In the other combination Dick Evans
and Earl Meyers replaced Rudness
and Tom agno. There is no note of
finality here, however, for Matt Pat-
anelli must be taken into considera-
tion as well as several members of the
second team. Cappon will not be able
to name anything more than tem-
porary Varsity until all of these men
haye seen actual service later in the
season.
All of the teams on the floor yes-
terday averaged well over the six-foot
mark. This height proved an aid on
the follow-in shots, with John Gee
and the Townsends outstanding in
this department.
Townsend's Passing Aids
As usual John Townsend's passing
and ball handling led to a majority
qf the first team's scores. Many of
John's passes from the side of the
foul circle were of the more compli-
cated type which allowed the cutting
player to get behind the pivot man
before he received the pass and gave
neither the offensive or defensive
player any warning. Some of these
were muffed largely because the re-
ceivers have not as yet become or-
ientated to this type of pass. Time
should smooth out this difficulty.
The other teams were made up of
John Jablonski, Manny Slavin, Don
Brewer, Bill Lane ,and Herm Fish-
man; Jim Warns, Bill Whitehead,
Dick Castle, John Mooney, and Bill
Valentine; and a third quintet com-
posed of the four gridmen and Jim
Warns.

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WALK A FEW STEPS
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