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November 23, 1935 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-23

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1935

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Ticket SellOut
For Annual Ball
Is Announced
Fall Color Scheme Will Be
Used In Decorations;
Ushers Named
A complete sell-out of tickets for
the annual Panhellenic Ball, to be
held from 9 p.m. until 1 a.m. Fri-
day, Nov. 29 in the ballroom of the
League, was announced by Betty
Anne Beebe, '37, chairman of the
ticket committee, late ast night.
The 'tickets were placed on sale
in the various sorority houses one
week ago. It will be impossible to
open the sale for independent women
as previously announced, Miss Beebe
stated.
Ushers Announced
Five uppperclassmen have been se-
lected to serve as ushers for the Ball,
Kathryn Rietdyk, '36, chairman of the
usher committee, announced. They
are: Charles Greening, '36; Thomas
Kleene, '36; Reed Hartz, '37E; George
Duffy, '38L; and Lorenzo T. Carlisle,
'38L.
Mary Lambie, '37, chairman of dec-
orations, stated that a fall color
scheme would be used as the pre-
dominant note for the ball. A small
hedge of huckleberry greens is to sur-
round the orchestra platform.
Tall pillars of the same greens will
form a background for the band with
large vases of chrysanthemums in au-
tumn colors completing the setting.
Palms and ferns will bank the foyer.
Gill To Play
Emerson Gill and his radio band
have been contracted to play for
the annual Ball. Gill will bring his
orchestra from Detroit where it has
been filling an engagement in the
Cocktail Lounge of Hotel Webster
Hall.
Gill will feature Marion Mann, his
novelty singer and entertainer, at the
Ball. Also coming with his 10-piece
band, will be a large cast of enter-
tainers.
Promptly at 12 midnight the grand,
march will commence with Sue Tho-
mas, '36, and George Lawton, '35,
leading the line. Other members of
the central committee will march be-
hind them.
Adelia Chewver
Reception Held
Friday Evening
The Board of Governors and resi-
dents of Adelia Cheever House en-
tertained more than 200 members of
the faculty last night at a formal re-
ception.I
Officiating in the dining room were
Mrs. Alexander G. Ruthven, Mrs. J.
Raleigh Nelson, and Mrs. Edward H.
Kraus at the table assisted by Mrs.
Edson R. Sunderland, Mrs. C. O.
Davis, Mrs. Alta M. Schule, Mrs. Al-
lison Ray Heaps, Mrs. Ellen Hinsdale
and Mrs. Frederick Novy. In the
coffee room were Mrs. William G.
Smeaton, Mrs. Mary Markley, Miss
Inez V. Bozorth and Miss Sarah
Rowe.
In the reception line were Kathleen
M. Dell, president, Mrs. Joseph Par-
sons, house director, Miss Alice C.
Lloyd Miss Jeanette Perry, Mrs.
Byrl F. Bacher, Mrs. Louis C. Kar-
pinski, Mrs. Edward H. Kraus, Mrs.
Edson R. Sunderland, Mrs. Charles
Washburn, Mrs. John W. Bradshaw
and Miss Ruth Jennings of Detroit.

To Wed Grid Star

-Associated Press Photo.
The Engagement of Miss Kath-
leen Richards of Fayette, Ala., to
Den Hutson, former Alabama foot-
ball star, has been announced. He
is now with the Green Bay Packers
of the National professional league.
Mos er Jordan
ill old Open
HouseToday
Following the game today Mosher
and Jordan Halls will entertain at
open house. All residents of the dor-
mitories and their friends are in-
vited.
Arrangements in Mosher are in
charge of Angel Maliszewski, '38,
chairman of teas. Her committee in-
cludes Marjorie Mackintosh, '37;
Nancy Kover, '38; Dorothy Gittleman,
'38; Mary Andrew, '37; Margaret Fer-
ries, '38; Barbara Schacht, '37; Mar-
garet Myers, '38; Martha Berry, '38;
Frances Burgess, '38; and Helen Pfol-
ler, '38. Decorations will consist of
a large wooden bowl filled with vege-
tables and flanked with orange
candles.
Beth Turnbull, '37, has charge of
the open house arrangements in Jor-
dan. Her committee includes Lucy
Almand, '38; Audrey Anderson, '36;
Joan Anderson, '37; Betty Decell, '38;
Vera Gambill, '39; June Hora, '37;
Lois Keddy, '36; Alice Levenson, '39;
Ella Miller, '36; Miriam Miller, '38;
Virginia Mviulholland, '39; Rosemary
Neuhaus, '37; Dorothy Nichol, '39;
and Betty Wilson, '38.
A large centerpiece of yellow chrys-
anthemums and yellow candles will
be used. Lucille Johnston, '36, and
Kathleen Scheer, '37, will pour.
GUESTS AT ACACIA DANCE
Marguerite McGrath, East Lans-
ing; Mary Miller, Windsor, Ont.;
and Helen Cawsibo, Detroit, will be
among the out of town guests at the
informal dance tonight at which
members of Acacia fraternity will
honor their pledges.

Stanley Chorus
Gives Program
At Lea ue Tea
425 Women Attend 2nd
Reception; Band Plays
For Dancing
The second of the League tea
dances, sponsored by the social com-
mittee under Martha Steen, chairman
and Lila Campbell, '36, assistant
chairman, which took place from 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. yesterday, was attended
by 425 women students. The usual
program of dancing to the music of
Al Cowan's orchestra had the added
attraction of entertainment by the
Stanley Chorus under the direction of
Achilles Taliaferro.
The songs offered by the chorus
of 85 women's vocies which gave its
first public performance of the year,
were three love songs of Brahms,
and C. Lee Williams' "Song of the
Peddler." Dorothy Corson, '38, made
her first appearance before the mic-
rophone at the League singing "Just
One of Those Things" and "Mad
About the Boy."
Hostesses at the two tea tables
during the course of the afternoon
were Mrs. Byrl F. Bacher, Mrs. Clar-
ence S. Yoakum, Mrs. Harry G. Kipke,
Mrs. Grace Doggett, Mrs. Otto G.
Graf. Mrs. Ellen S. Stanley, Mrs. Emil
Lorch, Mrs. Marguerite Turner, Miss
Jeannette Perry, Miss Margaret Stone
and Mrs. Marie Hartwig.
Among the guests at the tea were
Dean Alice Lloyd and her sister Mrs.
William P. Jesse. Miss Maxine May-
nard, former president of the League
returned in honor of the occasion
and Jean Seeley, '36, her successor
in the office of president, took time
out from her many duties to join in
the festivities.
Initiation Held By
Geography Soeiety
Chi Gamma Phi, professional geo-
graphy fraternity, initiated six mem-
bers Monday in the Union and an-
nounced a new plan for joint re-
search in Kentucky.
The new members are James Oliv-
er, Frederick Bunton, Fred Settel-
miner, Irvin Dickson, Wilfred Smith
and Clyde Kohn, all students in the
Graduate School.

By JEWEL WUERFEL
It was over their heads too . .
Umbrellas, that is, over theheads
of the ancients. For umbrellas are
no new invention.
The first record of an umbrella is
seen in a Chaldean bas-relief dating
back to 3,000 B.C., according to a re-
port given by Miss Helen Hall of the
fine arts department in a recent class
period on Islamic Arts taught by Prof.
Mehmet Aga-Oglu. This ancient
sculpture shows the king, Tell-el-Mu-
gayi, riding in his chariot with an
accompanying servant protecting the
king from the intense rays of the
Eastern sun.
Royal Significance
The use of the umbrella had a royal
significance, never being used by the
masses but only as a part of proces-
sions of the king. In Egyptian art
an example is seen in a wall paint-
ing on one of the tombs at Thebes.
An interesting sunshade in a relief
from the palace of Ashurbanipal at
Nineveh is brightly embroidered in
red and blue. Again the umbrella is
used solely for the protection and
glory of his imperial majesty.
In Persian Scenes
In the Achaemenid period of art
in Persia in the third century B. C.
are more scenes with umbrellas in
the background. One is on the walls
of the palace of Xerxes and another
is displayed in a hunting scene of
King Chroseroes II, adding another
comfort to the leisure hunting system
of thesenkings where animals aresre-
leased one at a time and driven past
CORRECT STYLE in
HATS
Created with a Flair
for Individuality
ORIGINAL HANDLING
OF MATERIALS
by
JUNE GREY HAT
STUDIO
Also Specializes in
Re-Styling of Hats and Dresses
551 CHURCH STREET

the chariot of the king to be shot by a
royal arrow.
The imperialvalue of umbrellas is
not apparent in Greek art, for on a
Greek vase of the fifth century B.C.
a scene of a procession and dance of
old men shows all but one carrying
one.
Art pieces displaying examples are
from many other lands, India, China,
Japan, Syria, Ethiopia, and in more
recent works from almost all modern
countries. The umbrellas shown in
Islamic art have an eagle attached
to them which signifies fortune. Those
in Japan are merely ornamental para-
sols made of embroidered silk.
The most recent examples of um-
brellas in modern illustrations are
those seen in photographs and car-
toons of Emperor Haile Selassie.
PHI BETA DELTA
Phi Beta Delta fraternity is enter-
taining with a closed informal dance
tonight. Marvin Kahn's orchestra
from Detroit will play. Mr. and Mrs.
Ben Fishman and Mr. and Mrs. Mau-
rice Fishman, Detroit, will act as
chaperones.
THETA CHI
Theta Chi is entertaining Lester
Kauffman, '38, Kenton, O., who has
returned for the Ohio State game
this week-end.

Modern Moisturephobia Didn't
Create Demand For Umbrella

Janet Minch To Be of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. Th
couple will make their home in Okla-
Wedded In League homa City, Okla.
The wedding of Mrs. Janet Gay
Minch, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel M. Gay, of Ann Arbor, and
E. Jennings McBride, Jr., son of Mr. Wachs
and Mrs. E. J. McBride, Sr. of Okla-
Noma City, Okla. will be held at 12:15
p.m. today in the League Chapel.
The bride will be accompanied by
her sister, Miss Marian Gay and the
bridegroom's attendant will be Mr.1i
Robert McFarlane.I HALL ER'S
The bride attendced Bradford Aca- State at Liberty
demy in Bradford, Mass. Mr. Mc- Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing
Bride is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Michigan. He is a member
1 ,

0
Stop in at
corner of Hill and
South State Street,
for a bite to eat
on your way to the
Football Game!
Barbecues are our
Specialty.
9

BEATRICE

BEAUTY
Shampoo and F
Vton., Tues., wed.
25c
SOUTH STATE

SHOP
End
Permanents
$1.00

inger Wave
Thurs., Fri., Sat.
35c
DIAL 3544

:-l _

l

No, you don't hear a sound

5,

s,

from an Elect rolux

"IT

NURSES
We have a new supply of crisp
white uniforms for you-indi-
vidually fitted and sure to
wear well.
FROM $2.50
EVERYONE!!
Take advantage of this
Opportunity.
SAVE CASH ON
SWEATERS
10% DISCOUNT
GLENN-ANN SHOPPE
1031 East Ann Street
Only I block from Couzens Hall
Open till 8:30 Phone 4321

I-

Where To Go

Theater: Majestic, "The Man That
Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo" with
Ronald Colman; Michigan, "In Old
Kentucky" with Will Rogers; Whit-
ney, "Confidential" with Donald Cook
and "We're in the Money" with Joan
Blondell; Wuerth, "Public Hero No.
1" with Chester Morris and "Thunder
Mountain" with George O'Brien.
Dancing: Silver Grill of the League,
Union Ballroom, Chubb's, Hut Cel-
lar.
ALPHA GAMMA SIGMA
Members of Alpha Gamma Signi
held an informal pledge dance last
night in the Alumnae Room of the
League. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hollw:,
Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Finlay and Mrs .
Clarence Pettibone, sponsors of th:
organization, were the chaperones.
Music was supplied by Jacob and his
Wolverines.
When you are having your
cleaning done, you want
the best service at the most
reasonable rates. That is
exactly what we are offer-

jI

In

.L

O "
Santa Says:'
Give LINGERIE
Our complete stocks of Lingerie make selections
easy. Buy now and have them wrapped for
Christmas Gifts.

Eloctrolux can't possibly make a sound
.-because it has no moving parts. It's
free from repairs, too... and operates
for less than any other!
LISTEN-but you won't hear a sound
from Electrolux. Neither when you buy
it, nor after long use! Electrolux is per-
manently silent because it has no moving
parts to cause noise. A tiny gas flame
does all the work!
A tremendous advantage! But that's
otny one of the ways in which the New
6. dY E LECLJ

Air-Cooled Electrolux is years ahead.
Compare operating costs. You'll find Elec-
trolux operates for less than any other
automatic refrigerator made! "No mov-
ing parts" means freedom from repairs,
and long life, too. There's nothing about
Electrolux to wear, nothing to cause
trouble and need fixing.
Yet with all its superioritiest
Electrolux costs no more to buy
than other leading automatic
refrigerators! And remember-
we back every Electrolux we sell.

SL IPS - C-J EMSFl,
PANTIES - DANCETTES
BED JACKETS - GOWNS

PRICES RANGE FROM
ONE NINETY-EIGHT
TO TEN DOLLARS

MODAIRE SILK HOSIERY
Sold at Hutzel's Only
The smartly dressed woman demands sheerer,
lovelier stockings. She wants them silk from top
to toe. She wants them ringless-full-fashioned,
too. And she wants them (very much) for Christ-
mnas !
All Desirable Colors
2 Prs. for $1.85
Others from 79c to $1.35

r

EIOJ4IX

10%
DISCOUNT
On All 1935 Floor
Models.

$1.75 down $20.00
24MONTHS TO ALLOWANCE
PAY THE BALANCE For Your Old Ice Box.

i

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