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November 23, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"i uTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

Old Rivalries
Top Big Ten
Football Card
50,000 Expected To See
Notre Dame And US.C.
Tangle On Gridiron
CHICAGO, Nov. 22. - Capacity
crowds are expected to fill the foot-
ball stadia of the Mid-West this
afternoon when the Big Ten season
draws to a close and Notre Dame ends
its most successful year since the
Rockne era.
With weather conditions favorable,
at least 70,000 will fill the huge Mich-
igan Bowl to see the 32nd meeting of
this section's greatest rivals, Michi-
gan and Ohio State. The Buckeyes
are overwhelming favorites to win
and in all liklihood tie Minnesota for
the conference title. However, Coach
Harry Kipke has his charges primed
for the affair and after Ohio's one
touchdown defeat of Illinois may pull
one of the year's biggest upsets.
Ramblers Meet Trojans
Notre Dame plays host to South-
ern California at South Bend and
the largest turnout in the history of
the Irish stadium is expected to see
the encounter. The Trojans have
come along rapidly lately and have
hopes of adding one more defeat to
a splendid Notre Dame record. It is
the 10th clash between the Irish and
Trojans and upwards of 50,000 will
be there.
Gamestbetween traditional rivals
feature the Mid-West card, a fact
that has somewhat complicated the
dopesters' predictions. Next in im-
portance perhaps, due to its bearing
on the outcome of the Western Con-
ference race, is the Minnesota-Wis-
consin battle at Minneapolis. A scant
few. hold out hopes of a Badger win
although Wisconsin's defeat of Pur-
due early in the month proved that
"Doc" Spears can put a good team
on the field. A win for the Goph-
ers will clinch at least a tie for its
second consecutive conference cham-
pionship and perhaps enable them to
claim another national title.
"Old Oaken Bucket" Rival
Clark Shaughnessey's Maroons in-
vade Urbana to meet the Fighting
Illini of Professor Zuppke and are
the under dogs in a battle that can
decide no title race but only provide
muchnsatisfaction to backers of the
winning eleven.
The other two conference games,
Purdue-Indiana and Iowa-Northwes-
tern, round out the Mid-West's sched-
ule of important games. The Hawk-
eyes and Wildcats rate about on even
terms.
"The Old Oaken Bucket" comes up
for discussion at Bloomington where
the Purdue Boilermakers seek to re-
venge last year's unexpected defeat at
the hands of the Hoosiers. Although
favorites, Purdue fears Indiana may
pull another surprise and is taking
precautions to insure victory.

I

Today's Games

Purdue at Indiana
Chicago at Illinois
Wisconsin at Minnesota
Iowa at Northwestern
Yale at Harvard
Dartmouth at Princeton
U.S.C. at Notre Dame
California at Stanford
Oregon at Washington
Baylor at S.M.U.
Vermont at Army
Duke at N.C.S.

Bears, Indians
Battle For Rose
Bowl Bid Today
Both T hornhill, Allison
Express Willingness Tol
Meet Any Eleven
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 22. - UP) -

Dick Degener, World's Greatest M
o-M Sorts
Diver, joins Benedictine Ranks I
G vill wiw iI'piD inTni

ing their opponents scoreless, the
final issue was never in doubt.
Bill Wells tallied seven points to
lead the individual scorers,

i Relit 4.+111 0Vtl'wilt lllleu ueitltt uuhi- 1

t
1

By GEORGE J. ANDROS
The next public appearance of the
world's greatest diver of all time -
at the huge gala to be held Friday,
December 13th at the Intramural pool
- will be his first as a married man.
Dick Degener, former Michigan
Varsity star and now engaged in the
tailoring craft over on William St.,
is scheduled to repeat the fatal words
late today.
The baby-faced blond, who was
dubbed "The Champ" by Coach Matt
Mann before graduation took him

New Pivot

Rule

Change Will Aid

V
ti
u
b
a
9
x
t

Townsend's

Play

John Townsend, sophomore star
around whom Coach Franklin Cap-l
pon is building the 1935-36 edition
of the Michigan basketball team, is
confident that the new change in the
pivot rule has made him more effec-
tive.
As Earl, the elder of the Townsend
brothers and forward on the Varsity
five, puts it, "The new rule requires
plenty of passing ability and cap-
able ball handling and John is tops
in both of these departments."
"The really big boys," John is
only 6 feet 4 inches tall, "are going
to have plenty of trouble getting rid
of the ball around the foul circle. It's
becoming harder and harder to just
hand the ball to a cutting player.
You've got to pass it now and usually
you have to pass it backwards."
LeroyEdwards, Kentucky's sopho-
more ace who was chosen as All-
American center last year and who
was a teammate of both of the broth-
ers at Tech High School in Indiana-
polis, dropped out of school this
year. Both John and Earl feel that
the new rule had a real effecton his
decision. Edwards was a pivot man of
the old school and had to have time to
jockey position under the basket.
Once settled, his great heighth and
weight made him a hard man to stop.
The new revision of the three-second
rule would have made it very hard for
him to play this type of ball this year.
Jim Seward, the 6 foot 8 inch Pur-'
due center, who is an old rival of the
Townsends, is going to be a lot easier
to handle this year John thinks. Like
Bob Riegel of Illinois, Fred Fecht-
man of Indiana, and Jesse MacAnally
of Northwestern, he isn't quite clever
enough with the ball to be used to
full advantage without plenty of op-
portunity to jockey for position. In-
cidently, MacAnally will not be with
the Wildcats for he has dropped out
of school this year.
The Michigan basketball team is on
its way up John thinks, and fans need
no longer feel that the Wolverines
are inferior to other Big Ten quin-
tets. The new changes have really
helped Cappon a lot. George Rud-
ness is going to get a real opportunity
to use his speed this year and ball
handlers like Capt. Chelso Tomagno
and Earl Meyers are to find the going
easier.

Willingness to take on any football
team in the country if they win the
western Rose Bowl bid was expressed
by rival coaches today as California
and Stanford neared their "big
game'" tomorrow at Palo Alto.
The first official disclosure that
parties which may be the most in-
terested hold no brief for procedure
which always has called for a visiting
Rose Bowl contender from east of the
Mississippi River was made by
Coaches Leonard (Stub) Allison of
California and Claude (Tiny) Thorn-
hill of Stanford.
The field, so far as the coaches
are concerned, is thrown wide open.I
It can be either of the two strong
Texas universities, Southern Metho-
dist or Texas Christian, as well as the
presently unbeaten Dartmouth team.
Coach Allison, unwilling to talk of'
the New Year's Day classic while pre-
paring his unbeaten Bears for the
season's most important game, yield-
ed to say :
"If we're lucky enough to get to
the Rose Bowl, we don't care which
team we play. The location of the
school won't mean a thing."
RIGHT HALVES OMITTED
The names of Ed. Phillips and
Lilburne Ochs, right half backs for
the Freshman and Phys. Ed. teams
were inadvertently omitted from
the starting lineups in yesterday's
issue of The Daily.

J :3. Deveuer Las ben (iving for it) Ion yesterday to revng e last year's
years. Ile hopes to climax his string defeat and capture the interfratern-
of victories with a win in next sum-io
mer's Olympic games at Berlin. He ity speedball championship by out-
ersOypcgmsaBeln Hescoring their opponents, 16-3. After
placed third at Los Angeles in 1932. the firstperiod in which the ultimate
Before coming to Michigan to winv
two Western Conference and two Na- victors scored five points while hold-
tional Collegiate titles, Dick was twice
Michigan high school champion from
Detroit Central and won the National
Interscholastic crown his last year. Ann Arbor'sF
America's diving strength is fa-
vored to bring the Olympic swimming
championship back from Japan, but
Degener is firm in his belief that the
United States swimmers could win
without the aid of their divers. "The
Nipponese spring-board performers
will furnish a threat," the favorite
for the next championship stated,
"only if they improve as much in the
next year as they have in the last
three. The Japanese are too me-
chanical, possessing good acrobatic":. :
technique but no natural grace.": f

1

l
it

DEGENER
ever come close

from the Wolver-
ine ranks in 1934,
earned the title of
the greatest diver
of all time in the
National A. A. U.
indoor champion-
ships at New York
last winter when
he piled up a rec-
ord total of 180.68
points from the
three-meter board.
No other diver has
to- annexing that

College Cab 0

onI

Fastest Growing
SShop
SUITS - - OVERCOATS
SHOES - - FURNISHINGS
Overcoats
for the game
$15.90
Big, all-wool Meltons, checked
fleeces and dashing Polo types-
each one a powerful demonstra-
tion of the quality values that
have made the Men's Shop so
outstandingly successful.

I

.c

I,. ,d

I

many points in 10 dives.
Degener's record over a period of
four years includes 12 national cham-
pionships - two of them in inter-
collegiate competition and the re-
maining number in the indoor and
outdoor meets of the National A.A.U.
In each of the past three years, Dick
has captured three out of the four
A.A.U. titles, including three-meter
board indoors and outdoors, one-
meter or low-board indoors, and the
high or 10-meter platform outdoors.
He has yet to lose a three-meter title
indoors, winning in his first attempt
in 1932 and repeating every season
since.
Starting his active career as a
spring-board performer at the age ofI

III

a:
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MU FFLERS
WARM because they're
100% wool and woven
tightly! New because
they're plaids, checks
and diagonal weaves!
Smart because they knot
loosely under the chin!
Black, red, blue, brown,
and maize combinations.

SUITS
$15.90

Fashionable all-wool fabrics
tailored to 16 points of superior-
ity. New colors, new weaves, new
sports backs and business styles.

Mufflers
69c

EXPERT
REPAIRING
and
ALTERATIONS
Are the outstanding fea-
tures of our service.

Obtain Good
CHRISTMAS
and
Michiganensian
Photographs

T. B. LYONS
515 East William Street
DIAL 5516

69

Gay plaids that will add color-
ful dash to your winter outfit.
Rayons and wools.
SATURDAY DOLLAR SPECIALS
Hand Made Ties. . . 2 for $1.00
Reg. 29c Hose, 4 pairs for $1.00
Cotton or Outing Pajamas $1.00
MEN'S SHOP - BASEMENT
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Quality Cleaning
PERFECT PRESSING
Expert Repairing

KRESGE'S
25c TO $1.00 STORE
200 South Main

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II

A Complete Radio Service
1. PHILCo and SPARTAN Home Radios
2. Radios for Rent.
3. Radio Parts for Amateurs.
4. Power Amplifiers for Rent.
5. Radio Repairs - All Makes.
6. Automobile Radios and Service.
Purchase Radio Service

Two-Hlour Dry Cleaning
Service When Required!
When an emergency arises that calls for fast Dry Cleaning
Service, don't forget our Special 2-Hour Emergency Service!
MEN'S SUITS AND HATS
LADIES' COATS AND DRESSES
EXPERTLY CLEANED and PRESSED
"BadSHOE REPAIRING SERVICE
S rBand Box Cleaners
Superlative Cleaning Service (Formerly Shoe and Hat Service)

Now Ready--'DISCOVERY"

$3.75

The Story of the Second Antarctic Expedition-
With illustrations and Maps - by
RICHARD E. BYRD, Rear-Admiral, U.S.N. (Ret.)

WAHR'S BOOKSTORES
316 State Street - Main Street Opposite Courthouse
HEADQUARTERS FOR LECTURE COURSE TICKETS

)

121 East Liberty Dial 8722

~~"'

J

0

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W8RP

331 SOUTH MAIN ST.

Phone 8696

\CJs

i,

i

l;

A Fitting Climax
for the Football Season ...

Today's Eyes Are On
Michigan and Ohio State
Tomorrow you may be the center of attraction. All of us,
whether we are aware of it or not, fall under the close scrutiny
of society and are judged by how we look as much as how we
act. People are realizing more and more the importance of
personal appearance in every endeavor of life. Form the
habit now of insisting on neat attire. Our CLEANING and
PRESSING service has always stressed quality work and
super service. Hand pressing is a feature which we offer at
no extra cost to you. Phone 6868 for assured satisfaction.

I.

The "STATE" Game and
Dinner at PREKETE'S.

0Announcing -
The College Supply Shop is now ready to
serve you, with a full line of Tobacco's, Can-
dies, Toilet Goods, Periodicals, Blue Books,
Notebooks, Fillers, etc.
Operated by M. J. Schaller and Son at the
Corner of William and Maynard Streets.
COLLEGE SUPPLY SHOP
601 East William Street

Nothing less than the best food in town
must follow the last game of the season.
Come in for dinner after the game.

HABERDASHERY
Our line of shirts, ties, and all
accessories for the moderndman
iA complete in variety and style.
The latest Reps and Foulards
may be found in our stock as
well as the neat stripe designs
and collar styles in our shirt
selection. Formal accessories are
also featured.

SWEATERS
Men will be pleased with our
fine stock of wool sweaters of
every design and color. During
these cold winter days you will
want several and can afford
them at our extremely reasonable
prices. It will pay you to stop
in and shop.

PREKETE'S
1 19 SOUTH MAIN STREET

OSWALD KATZ

810 S. State St.

CLEANERS and DYERS

Phone 6868

,i

11

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