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November 16, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THEr MT l IX XTEY

SATURDAY, NOV

Jones Defends
Students' Right
To Education
Preuss . And Vandenberg
Differ; Pollack Sees
Civil Service Need
(Continued from Page 1)
university is a hotbed of Commun-
ism," he asked the editors, "I ask you
to remember that the faculty of your
university is, so far as I know, still
in the main honestly trying to main-
tain balance and proportion, still
striving to keep your university what
it was intended to be- a free forum
for the discussion of ideas, an island
of calm in which, for the benefit of
the whole people, a group of men
and women, young and old, are trying
to lead the intellectual life."
Speaking on the afternoon pro-
gram, Prof. Lawrence Preuss of th
political science department took
issue with Senator Vandenberg'
speech of the night before and de-
clared that. the United States should
accept "partiality" rather than neu-
trality and accept a plan of respon-
sibility to cooperate with the League
of Nations.
Traces Neutrality
Professor Preuss traced the history
of the United States' policies of neu-
trality and said that, whereas before
only the extremes of neutrality or
belligerency were open to the nation,
"We now have a third concept - par-
tiality." He explained this to mean
that the United States in maintain-
ing alleged neutrality toward both of
two belligerent governments, really
often aids one or the other. If an
embargo on munitions is declared, he
pointed out, the nation which does
not import munitions will not be
harmed at all, and the nation which
does will be aided.
The Kellogg pact for the renuncia-
tion of war, Professor Preuss held,
definitely implies more than a moral
obligation. "I cannot understand the
statement of Senator Borah that it
has only a moral application," he
said, "nor can I understand Senator
Vandenberg's view that it is binding
only on our conscience. I do not
think the possibilities of the pact
have been sufficiently explored. If
we want to enjoy the fruits of the
Kellogg pact, we must designate the
aggressor of a war."
He urged that Congress should con-
sider legislation that would prohibit
the United States from exporting
more to Italy in time of warthan
in time of peace. (In that case," he
explained, "we would not have to
compete with the League."
Pollock Speaks
Professor Preuss placed consider-
able emphasis on the United States'
treaty with Italy, formulated in 1871.
That pact provides, he said, for' free-
dom of trade between the nations ex-
aept in contraband in war. "And the
list of contraband it sets forth is iden-
tical with that set forth in the recent
neurality legislation."
Professor James K. Pollock, also of
the political science department and
recently appointed civil service com-
chairman of Governor Fitzgerald's
mission, addressed the morning ses-
sion of the club on "Government by
Merit." "It is little short of criminal
that the state should not secure the
services of its best qualified people.
"While nine states stand out with
more or less satisfactory civil service
schemes, Michigan, unfortunately has
been crawling along on the old pat-
ronage basis which Governor Fitz-
gerald most appropriately calls 'the
most corroding influence in popular
government.'"
Howard W. Blakeslee, science editor
of the Associated Press, addressed

the evening session, telling of dis-
coveries in American laboratories and
his experience in writing about them
'A Scientist Too'
"I never opened a science book,"
he said, "but I am a scientist too. I
know how to write it to get it into the
newspapers. My theory is that you
should put motion into science news."
Junius B. Wood, former special
correspondent of the Chicago Daily
news and a noted reporter, described
difficulties in obtaining news from
Nazi Germany. In a series of anec-
dotes, he brought out the principle
that the foreign correspondent "must
interpret the news of the country for
the American public."
In most of Europe the press is con-
trolled, he said, and to tell the truth
the correspondent must have "a little
ingenuity."
Andrew A. Bishop of the State Wel-
fare Department opened the morn-
ing session, speaking on "The Proba-
tion Problem in Michigan." "The
establishment of a state probation
system here is the most progressive
and most needed action Michigan
could take," he said. Such a system,
he declared, "which would really save
the state much money, "must be fi-
nanced by the state."
Prof. Wesley H. Maurer of the
journalism department, which spon-
sors the Press Club, spoke at the be-
ginning of the afternoon session on
"The Spectrum of Though."

Little Symphony Orchestra To Give Concert Tomorrow

Shakespeare
Topic Of Radio
Talk By Price

J

The University of Michigan Little Symphony Orchestra will present a concert at 8:15 p.m. tomorrow in
the Ethel Fountain Hussey Room of the League. The players are, shown above (standing-left to right)
Raymond Kondratowicz, George Haley, Thor Johnson, William Jones, Joseph White; (seated-left to
right) Charles McNeil, William Bagwell, Romine Hamilton, John Mosajgo, Ruby Peinert, Charles Gilbert, John
Krell, Vlasta Podoba, Karl Farr.

Fourth Floor 'Attic' Discovered
To Be Rendezvous Of Sculptors

Department Is One Of Few
Of Its Kind In America,
Says Prof. Fairbanks
By ELSIE A. PIERCE
The average student who has no-
ticed the array of ghostly-looking fig-;
ures propped up against the windows
of the fourth floor of University Hall
has perhaps idly wondered what went
on up there. Those figures which
have aroused so much curiosity are
pieces of sculpture and the fourth-
floor "attic" is the rendezvous of stu-
dent artists, for it houses the sculp-
ture department of the University.
However, this is one department
where the average student is not wel-
come-in fact he is even excluded.
Only those who have special talent in
sculpture are admitted to the courses,
which are under the direction of
Prof. Avard Fairbanks.
This department, which attempts
according to Professor Fairbanks "to
combine a general cultural education
with practical training in creative
work," is one of the few of its kind in
America. In the majority of uni-
versities in this country fine arts are
taught only through lecture courses,
or- where practical work is offered, it
is through technical courses in land-
scape design or architecture.
Established In 1928
The opportunity for establishing
the department came in 1928 when
authorities of the University ex-
pressed the belief that if talented stu-
dents in science would receive better
training by working on original pro-
jects as a part of their general col-
lege education, the same should hold
true of fine arts students.
The Carnegie Corporation became
interested in the project and grant-
ed the University $100,000 to begin
the program, and to prove that crea-
tive art could be advantageously
taught in connection with higher ed-
ucation.
By means of this grant all activi-
ties iri the fine arts department were
expanded, but the most significant
development was the establishment
of the classes in sculpture.
Fairbanks A Noted Sculptor
Professor Fairbanks was brought
to Michigan to head the department.
He was educated at the Arts Students
League in New York, and Ecole Na-
tionale des Beaux Arts, and the Ecole
Moderne in Paris, and a Guggen-
heim Memorial Fellowship for study-
ing sculpture. Besides having taught
sculpture at the University of Ore-
gon, he has executed many important
commissions, such as the 91st Divi-
sion Memorial at Fort Lewis, Wash-
ington, the Pioneer Mother Memorial
in Vancouver, and the Washburn
Fountain in Eugene, Ore.
The facilities for the department
include three-large work rooms, lo-
cated on the fourth floor of Uni-
versity Hall, with powerful electric
lighting, modeling stands, big vats

for the clay, and heavy tables for
marble work.
As soon as a student has mastered
the fundamentals, he is given free
rein in working out his own ideas. The
first step in making the work is the
composition- that is, to make a
small clay model. Then the student
works on the actual figure, with only
his clay supported by an armature.
After the modelling is completed, it
is cast in a mold, and the plaster is
chipped off. Some of the finished
products, which are now on display
in the hall, are painted with imita-
tion bronze, which gives a coppery-
green effect.
Developing New Material
Professor Fairbanks is not only
supervising the work of the students,
but is also working on his own ideas.
Among them is the development of a
new secret material, which he calls
"wax-stone," which is pliable to work
with, and gives the. effect of yellow-
ish-brown wax, but which will be-
come as hard as marble in five or 10
years.
Exhibitions of student work are'
held annually in the League, and
some of the works have won special
recognition. "The Laborer" by Har-
ry Bethke, '36, was awarded the Anna
Scripps Whitcomb prize for the best
creative work at the annual Exhibi-
tion for Michigan Artists which
opened Wednesday at -the Detroit
Art Institute, while Harry Furst's
"Perseus" was given recognition at
the exhibition held last spring in
the Grand Central Galleries in New
York.
Work Is Widely Recognized
The work that Professor Fairbanks
and his classes have been doing has
achieved nation-wide recognition.
Among the noted art patrons who
have praised the program are George
S. Koyl, dean of the school of fine
arts of the University of Pennsyl-
vania, who wrote to Professor Fair-
banks, saying "Your students seem
to be doing excellent creative work
and I quite agree with you that with-
in the universities lies one of the
greatest hopes of successful sculptors
and painters for the future."
NORRIS BACKED BY ROOSEVELT
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15. - (/') -
President Roosevelt called upon the
people of Nebraska today to insist
that Senator George W. Norris, Re-
publican Independent, run for re-
election next year.

Vandenberg Is
Not Candidate
For Any Office'
Says Roosevelt Represents
'New Deal Party,' Not
Democrats
(Continued from Page 1)
in the November American Magazine
that there is little if any differences
between political parties in the United
States today. "It is true that the old
distinctions between Republicans and
Democrats do not exist today," he
admitted, "but this does not mean
that there are no sharp distinctions
at all. There has developed in recent
times a sharp division of political
opinion among the American people,
a complete realignment of thought,
and this must be expressed through
the parties."
Senator Vandenberg declared that
"President Roosevelt has never once
mentioned the Democratic party. He
does not represent the Democratic
party. He represents the New Deal
party.''
Andhe charged that the New Deal
is a party which "regards the Su-
preme Court as public enemy num-
ber one, which believes the court
holds back progress, which wants leg-
islation by executive decree rather
than by established legislative insti-
tution, and holds for a centralized
bureaucracy and regimentation."
Asked about so-called class distinc-
tions in the United. States, Senator
Vandenberg held that it is "all pure,
unadulterated bunk." He pointed to
himself, son of a harnessmaker, as a
denial of the fact that Americans
cannot rise above the "class" in
which they were born.
Although he said President Roose-
velt will "undoubtedly" win the
Democratic nomination, he was firm
in his belief that "American public
opinion cannot be bought" with the
New Deal "pork-barrel funds."
The Senator reemphasized his be-
lief that "We must either restore the
Republican party, next year or set
loose an unlimited experimentation
in centralized political bureaucracy,
which is the Democratic term for dic-
tatorship."

Advises Audience To See
Plays If They Want To
Appreciate Poet
"To study Shakespeare wisely, one
must see his plays at the theatre,"
Prof. Hereward T. Price of the Eng-
lish department advised WJR radio
listeners over the University broad-
casting hour yesterday.
One should also act in one of his
plays if possible no matter how small
the part may be, he added. In addi-
tion, one should, in order to under-
stand Shakespeare, read criticism
not only of the critics but of the ac-
tors themselves. He added a warn-
ing, however ,that "one should be-
ware of the Ph.D.'s and critics with
a theory to prove."
Presenting the main facts that have
been considered true concerning
Shakespeare's life, Professor Price
explained many of the former's char-
acteristics in terms of his environ-
ment." Shakespeare is characteristic-
ally Elizabethan in his flaming pas-
sion for beauty, his welcoming of new
ideas to discuss, and his command
of the vivid and striking phrase,"
Professor Price stated.
Shakespeare revealed in his writ-
ings one of the distinguishing ele-
ments of the age -the use of para-
doxical ideas, Professor Price con-
tinued. His heroes tend to be like
himself, men of an honest, free and
open nature, whom treachery brings
low. These heroes often are dream-
ers, and tragedy arises when they find
that the world will not let them
dream.
"In comedy he preaches sobriety,
moderation, the modesty of nature,"
Professor Price continued. "In trag-
edy he was profoundly skeptical about
the powers that rule the world. Life
was an ironic and tragic tangle, 'a
tale told by an idiot.' On the other
hand the morality shadowed forth in
these plays has been described as
the finest essence of Christianity.
One should regard his works as "re-
cording the struggles of a titanic
mind with the problems of his age
and the particular circumstances of
his private life presented to him,"
Professor Price concluded. The es-
sential is the endeavor to find some
sort of meaning and order in a
troubled and chaotic world."

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1934 Buick-67. Sedan,
low mileage, fender wells, trunk
rack, radio, heater, one owner. car,
in perfect condition. Will consider
trade and give terms to responsible
party. Call owner 2-3268. 110
FOR SALE: Beautiful genuine fur
coat. Size 14 to 16. 720 Haven.
111
FOR SALE: Genuine Leopard swag-
ger coat. Excellent condition. Size
14 to 16. Phone 9486. 105
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at Iow price. ix
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: One comfortable single
room. 516 Cheever Court. Phone
7073. 108
NOTICES
AFTER extensive remodeling the Col-
onial Inn will re-open Saturday,
November 16. Special attention
given to luncheon and dinner
parties. 109

WVIDOW LOSES SUIT
NEW YORK, Nov.15. - {_P}--Mrs.
Oscar Hammerstein, widow of the
operatic impressario, today lost her
suit to collect 8,692 from her stepson,
Arthur Hammerstein.
MICHIGAN
ENDING,
TODAY!
:. mot: 3 ,

FROM 'O' TO 'X'
TOPEKA, Kan., Nov. 15. - (P) -
Ernest L. Newman, county clerk,
tells of an elderly Negro woman who
had been signing relief receipts with
her mark. This week she signed an
'O' instead of a 'X' explaining: "I'se
just got married and changed mah
name."
SAVE 20%
by our
CHRISTMAS
LAY - A - WAY
PLAN
"
The TIME SHOP
1121 So. University Ave.

... From the same producers and
director who gave you "G-Men"I
... See how a daring beauty led
these man-hunters to the catch
that made the headlines scream!
BET E,

in
with
GEORGE n qT
BENNY DAVIS
and His STARDUST REVUE
IN PERSON - On Stage

i

Michigan Graduate
Honored As Artist
Jonathan A. Taylor, a graduate of
the University, was announced as one
of the prize winners at the Michigan
Artists' Show, now going on at the
Detroit Institute of Arts.
Mr. Taylor was a recipient of one
of five additional prize awards that
were reported at the show Wednesday.
The award, which was a $50 pur-
chase prize subscribed by Hal Smith,
was presented to Mr. Taylor for his
etching of "The Rigger," which is
an industrial scene showing a build-
ing in the process of construction.
ANTIQUE SHOW
November 14, 15, 16
ANN ARBOR ANTIQUE
DEALER'S ASSOCIATION
presents its
4th EXHIBITION and SALE
Harris Hall
Corner State and Huron

ONE WEEK AT
CHS TONLY 8.30
NLMON. NOV. 25th AM
THEATRE P M.
DETROIT MATINEES: WED. & SAT. AT 2:30 P. M.
WITHREMITTANCE AND
STAMPED ENVELOPE TO
CASS THEATRE, DETROIT
JUjDITH H ELEN
"NTHlE OLD MAID
4 ZOE AKINS y6omz EDTH WHARTONS NOVEL
WED. & SAT. MATS: ORCHESTRA $2.20, BALCONY $1.65, $1.10, 55c
EVENINGS: ORCHESTRA - $2.75, BALCONY $2.20, $1.65, $1.10,55C A O EPIE N L D A
ABVEPRCE ICLDETA
* ' r..

-Last Times Today

"HARMONY
LAN E" "and

"GOING
HIGHBROW##

MAJ ESTI

PRICES
C SATURDAY viATINEE and until
2 p.m. SUNDAY...............25C
Thereafter, ALL SEATS.........35c
TODAY! Come Early!

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Last Times Today
'DANTE'S INFERNO'
--and
"Hopolong Cassidy"
Sun. - Mon. - Tues.
GUY S'TANDING
"Annapolis Farewell"
KAY FRANCIS
'Goose and the Gander'

Daily TcEY
1:30 to 11 P.M. 25c After 6
STARTING SUNDAY
TWO BIG FEATURES!
First Ann Arbor Showing HOWARD HUGHES'
CHAS. FARRELL
CHARLOTTE HENRY "P g
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H eaven"

PAT O'BRIEN
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'xtra-

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"The Daily Classifieds
are good, too!"
CALL 2.1214

COLOR CARTOON

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LATEST NEWS

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LAST TIME TONIGHT
"TWELFT NIGHT

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You need ten eyes to see...
ten ears to hear...ten hearts
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Adolph Zukor presents
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