100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 12, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MTCTlANlqDITY

ITUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1925

. .. .................. - --

Three Groups
Attack Moves
By New Deal
C. Of C. Opposes Recent
Trends; President Like
George III, Is Charge
WASHINGTON, Nov. 11.- (P) -A
referendum by the Chamber of Com-
merce of the United States among its
local membership shows strong op-
sosition to "recent trends" of legis-
lation enacted under the New Deal.
The poll will not be completed
until Nov. 23, but the early voting
found only two local groups out of
28 which favored trends for which
the national chamber's directorate
requested "the most thoughtful at-
tention."
From two other sources came crit-
icism of New Deal policies while a
fourth brought forward evidence that
many editors would like to see the
budget balanced in the next fiscal
year.
The Liberty League likened Presi-
dent Roosevelt to King George III,
of England, whom it described as a
"symbol of autocratic power."
The National Economy League in
turn made public a poll of daily news-
papers, reporting that 359 of 377 f a-
vored immediate balancing of the
budget.
"The North, South, Middle West
and Far West," said Henry H.
Curran, director, "favor the proposal
almost in equal percentages."
NRA came in for a word from the
Brookings Institute. "NRA intro-
duced cartel-like features into many
American industries, in some cases
to far-reaching extent," its report
said. It added that cartels, as op-
erated in Europe, created flutuations
in production and employment rath-
er than bringing stability.
'Moral Control'
Disarmament
Urged By Priest
'Attar Of Roses' Panaceas
And 'Jungle Law' Are
Lashed By Fr. Walsh
DETROIT, Nov. 11.-(P) --The
Rev. Edmund A. Walsh, S. J., of
Washington, D. C., told a pre-Ar-
mistice day conference of the Catho-
lic Association for International
Peace that the League of Nations
would prove powerless to prevent war
without "moral" disarmament.
"You might as well try to quarry
granite with a razor's edge or mani-
cure a tiger's claws with attar of
roses as to attempt to bind thespurg-
ing passions of men without moral
control," declared the speaker, who is
vice president of Georgetown Uni-
versity.
Father Walsh predicted that the
League's next task would be alloca-
tion of raw materials on a basis of
justice which, he said, demanded the
exercise of "genuine statesmanship,"
rather than of the bayonet and "the
law of the jungle."
Naming no nation, he denounced
some Europeans for their "unChris-
tian idolatry of the state" which he
termed an "exaggerated selfishness
leading to economc imperialism."
In time of war, he continued, "all
classes of the community should be
conscripted, and I would begin by
conscripting the forces of those re-
sponsible for undertaking a war."

To Settle County'st
1936 Relief Today
A final settlement of the county's
relief program for the coming year
will be made in a special meeting of
the county board of supervisors start-
ing at 9:30 a.m. today. Delay in
final action was caused by the un-
certainty of WPA employment and
indecision as to the method of obtain-
ing relief funds.
The welfare committee of the board
will advance a plan in which the
township and city units will be as-
sessed 45 per cent of the costs, the
state supplying the other 55 percent.
Total direct relief costs are expected
to be $80,000 which will take care of
approximately 5 5 0 unemployed
throughout the year, supervisors said.
TO ARRAIGN REISE
John Reise, former University stu-
dent whose automobile collided with
one driven by Miller Schuck, '36M, at
Washtenaw Ave. and Baldwin St.
early Sunday morning, will be ar-,
raigned today on a charge of driving
while drunk.
The case of Schuck, who was driv-
ing without a University license ac-
cording to police, has not been con-
sidered yet, Dean Walter B. Rea said
yesterday.

Washington, D.C., Police Baffled By Strangling Case

-Associated Press Photo.
Washington, D.C., police were completely baffled at the fatal strangling of Corinna Loring (right), 26-

year-old stenographer, whose body was found in Maryland. She was to
who is held for questioning, two days after her disappearance.

have married Richard Tear (left),

Cape Cod Ired At Proposal To
Move Old Windmill To Detroit

WEST YARMOUTH, Mass., Nov.
11. -(7) - America's oldest windmill
apparentlyhasbecome a shrine of
antiquity overnight.
Cape Codders from the canal to
Provincetown and summer visitors
from all parts of the country rose to-
day to protest the removal of the
302-year-old mill from the edge of
West Yarmouth's summer colony to
Henry Ford's museum at Dearborn,
Mich.
Petitions were circulated when it
became known that the Ford Dealers'
Association of America had bought
the historic structure for the museum.
Representatives of civic organiza-
tions expressed resentment at the
proposal, and the town fathers of
West Yarmouth called a special meet-
ing for Tuesday night to decide what
should be done.
Apparently there was but one dis-
cordant note among the protesting
Cape Codders - Edward F. Gleason,
owner of the old windmill and the

land on which it stands, intimated
the old mill, which was built 13 years
after the Pilgrims landed at Plym-
outh, had become pretty important
to the cape folk overnight.
Nine or ten years ago, Dr. Gleason
said, he began negotiations with the
Yarmouth selectmen to have the mill
and surrounding land converted into
a town park, but the selectmen re-
fused the offer on the ground that the
town would be losing just so much tax
revenue.
The windmill and the taxes on it
were a heavy burden in the inter-
vening years, Dr. Gleason said. He
estimated he paid out between $4,000
and $5,000 in that period.
Then the Ford Dealers' Association
conceived the idea of presenting the
historic structure to Ford. Negotia-
tions were opened,randthe windmill
sold at a price not revealed.
Dr. Gleason said he had talked with
many Cape Codders and all agreed it
would be a good thing to put the mill
in Ford's hands.

Travel By Air
Is Safer Now,
Senate Is Told
Committee Plans Measure
To Improve Air Safety;
Gives Report
WASHINGTON, Nov. 11. - (P) -
Notwithstanding the recent series of
fatal airplane crackups, senate com-
merce subcommittee investigators
have concluded after a thorough sur-
vey that travel by air today is "three
times safer than ten years ago."
Carl Lolan, chief investigator of
accidents and federal aviation ad-
ministration for the subcommittee,
which is seeking the basis for new
legislation to improve safety in the
air, said this record was achieved
despite speed that permitted coast to
coast flying in one-fourth of the 60
hours required in 1921.
Dolan is laying the groundwork for
Senator Copeland (Dem., N.Y.), com-
mittee chairman, to present a safety
bill at the next session.rHe isassisted
by Lieut. Col. H. E. Hartney as tech-
nical advisor. Hartney was in com-
mand of the first pursuit group on
the western front, which included
most of America's aces.
"We haven't awakened to appre-
ciate the safety of modern air liners,"
said Hartney. "A major crack-up
used to affect passenger traffic for
weeks. Now it's only a few days."
Hartney said congestion at airports
"was helping safety by bringing to the
front the necessity for more and
better airports." He also figured "in-
tensive competition" was making for
progress.
Dolan said data gathered by the in-
vestigators showed 201 fatal airplane
crashes since 1927 and that a plane
not now made caused 35 of them.
APPROVE WPA FUNDS
DETROIT - (P) -Expenditure of
$15,398,747 on Michigan Works Pro-
gress projects was approved today in
Washington, Harry L. Pierson, state
WPA administrator, announced.
/7 - -V

$100,000 Loss,
Five Killed In
Montreal Fire
Insane Inmates Of Hospital
Burned To Death; Cause
Of Blaze Unknown
MONTREAL, Nov. 11. - (P) - Fire
which raged through a wing of the
St. Jean de Dieu mental hospital late
Saturday night caused the death of
five inmates and property damage
estimated by firemen at $100,000.
Hospital officials said the cause of
the conflagration probably would nev-
er be discovered. Firemen expressed
the theory a pyromaniac inmate was
responsible, but conceded that they
faced an almost hopeless task in con-
firming their theory.
Four violently insane inmates were
burned to death when they eluded
their guards and crept back to their
cells in the blazing building. Another
inmate died from heart disease.
The shrill shouts of one patient,
frightened by the sight of smoke and
flames creeping along the ceiling of
his cell, were credited by authorities
with preventing probably one of the
greatest fire disasters in Canadian
history.
Dashing to the cell, guards de-
tected the column of smoke.
The patients were removed quickly
from the hospital, some struggling
with their guards and attempting to
dash back to their cells.
GOOD MEAT RAISER
EAST LANSING - (!P)-The Mich-
igan championship in the 1935 4-H
meat animal achievement contest
went to Thomas Bust, 18, of Char-
lotte today.

Ships Attempt
To Rescue 50
FromFreighter
30 Marooned On Rock As
Swir ing ilp-Tides And
Winds Form A Prison
MANILA, P. I., Nov. 11.-(P)-A
small fleet of rescue vessels braved
the perils of dangerous San Bernar-
dino Straits today in an attempt to
rescue the passengers and crew of the
shipwrecked British freighter Silver
Hazel who were marooned on a rock.
Fifty or more persons were reported
aboard the freighter when it broke
in two on San Bernardino Island, off
the southern trip of Luzon island.
The Governor Taft, an inter-island
steamer, radioed that 30 persons were
on the rock. Others were reported
aboard the forward part of the ship.
The rock to which the survivors
escaped was turned into a prison by
the powerful current which races
through the strait, rip tides, heavy
swells and high winds.
The tides repeatedly turned back
small boats from at least three steam-
ers when they attempted to reach
the marooned party.
The Governor Taft and the Jap-
anese freighter Chicago Maru, whose
boats also failed in attempts to reach
the rock, asked that motorized life-
boats be sent out.
Thebsteamer Tana was also stand-
ing by, and the Navy sent the de-
stroyed Perry from Manila.
The freighter carried a crew of 45
or 40 and four or five passengers on
her voyage from San Francisco to
Manila.
Coast Guard Ship
Responds To SOS
HOUGHTON, Nov. 11. - (P)- The
coast guard cutter Crawford was en
route from the Two Harbors, Minn.
station to Isle Royale today, in re-
sponse to distress signals from the
steamer Elmar II.
The Elmar, bound from Duluth,
Minn., to Siskowit Bay, on the island,
reported that it had blown out twc
cylinders, but had reached shelter in
Washington Harbor, Isle Royale
MOE & CARTER
ORC HESTRAS
TWO BANDS -- GIRLS' TRIO
Public Address System
Phone, Ypsilanti 900-W
ANTIQUE SHOW
November 14, 15, 16
ANN ARBOR ANTIQUE
DEALER'S ASSOCIATION
presents its
4th EXHIBITION and SALE
Harris Hall
Corner State and Huron

Land Owners
Will Speak On
Zone Proposal,
Proposed Amendment Of
Council Allows State To
Build Anywhere In City.
Property owners of the city will be
given a chance to express their opin-
ions on the proposed amendment to
the zoning ordinance at a public
hearing to be held at 7:30 p.m. today
at the City Hall. The amendment is
designed to allow state-owned insti-
tutions to be included in class A resi-
dential districts.
The specific controversy is con-
cerned with the action of the state
in choosing the old Hoover estate on
Washtenaw Avenue for the future
cite of the Michigan Children's Insti-
tute.
Various interpretations of the
I changed ordinance by the council-
men indicate that it might be con-
strued to open the way for a wide-
open policy in enforcement of the
zoning restrictions. Councilmen hope
that the hearing will clear up this dis-
pute and also make clear the ruling
as it will affect the University's build-
ing policy.
This hearing has been agitated for
by property-owners in the vicinity of
the Hoover residence.
Kraus, Dana,
Others Plan
Several Trips
Dean Samuel T. Dana of the for-
estry school, and Dean Edward Kraus
of the literary college and several
professors will attend conferences and
inauguration exercises outside of the
State this month.
Dean Kraus will represent the Uni-
versity at the inauguration of Dr.
Allen Valentine as president of the
University of Rochester, Rochester,
N. Y., and Registrar Ira Smith will
attend the inauguration of the presi-
dent of Ashland College located at
Ashland, 0.
At the inauguration of Dr. Herman
G. James at Ohio University, Athens,
O., George Lasher, former instructor
here, will represent the University.
Prof. Howard M. Jones, Prof.l
Charles C. Fries, Prof. Erich A. Wal-
ter, Prof. Albert H. Marckwardt,'
Harold B. Allen, all of the English
department, will attend the meeting
of the national council of the teach-
ers of English to be held in Washing-
ton, D. C.

FOUND:
Found
Bldg.
on it.
desk.

Classified Directory

A black and gold ring.
at the Student Publications
Has a "Camp Chikopi" seal
Owner call at the Auditor's

Read The Want Ads

A

Daily

%AIL I ITLI E

15c to 6 P.M.

1:30 -11 P.M. VV n I® I"L9;1 25c after 6
Now- Two First-Run Features
ELLERY QUEEN'S GENE AUTRY
"SPANISH "TUMBLING
CAPE MYSTERY" TUMBLEWEEDS"
Extra
CARTOON - LATEST NEWS - LOWELL THOMAS

P

NOTICES
STATIONERY: Printed with your
name and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9a
PROVIDE STUDENT AID
WASHINGTON - (P) - Monthly
financial assistance for 3,533 needy
undergraduate students in Michigan
educational institutions was provided
today by the National Youth Ad-
ministration.
INSTRUCTIONS
Every form of dancing.
Open 10 to 10, Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695
MILLER
Dru Store
727 North University
Phone 9797
MICHIGAN SEAL
STATIONERY
IOc a Package

I

~----- _

LOST AND FOUND

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at Iow price. lx
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
BICYCLES -New and used for sale.
Dependable repairing. Campus Bike
Shop. Liberty and Maynard Sts.
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
YOU ARE SICK
YOU CONSULT
YOUR DOCTOR -r--
YOU NEED
LEGAL ADYICE
YOU CONSULT
YOUR LAWYER
o0 E vnEg
COME TO US
FINANCE COMPANY
Cor Washington & 4th, Ann:Arbor
S11 '1i r T " IiIW

.
i
a
1
e
i

THIS ALL PURPOSE
While it occupies but little
space, while it may be moved
easily to suit the convenience
of the operator and the work
to be done, the Remington
Noiseless Model 8 provides
all the operating features with
which ease and speed of type-
writer operation have been
made possible.
Remington Rand, Inc.
406 Wolverine Bldg.
Ann Aruor Phone 5888

1-

MICHIGAN

U"

NOW SHOWING

LOVESEN!A GIT OF: ROSES...
L.OVE SEtVAG atdOchids!
But She thought She Want Ohs
A Vino Delmar story ofm girl whose
mind wos made up to marry money
'til her heart double.crossed herb
Adolph Zukor presents

MATINEE .
25c
Bale. Eves. 25c
Main Floor
35c

I'

h g EY WWWUI (c RV at I =wRwR
A Paramount Picture Directed by Mitchell Leisen
ADDED
The Biggest Little Show on the Screen
Major Bowes' Amateurs
NEWS NOVELTIES

I

dI

I

MAJ ESTIC

LAST TIMES
TODAY

HIDDEN DRAMA GRAND OPERA'S
DIAMOND HORSESHOE NEVER SEES
T~

-------------
"
wmk

I

I _ ! - -r - - - -

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan