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November 10, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-10

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Til MICIGIAN DAILY

'- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1935

Paul Leyssac
To Speak Here
Next Thursday
Other Speakers Announced
For Cercle Francais Lec-
ture Series
Lecturers and their subjects for the
Cercle Francais lecture series were
released yesterday by Prof. Rene
Talamon of the French department.
Paul Leyssac will deliver the first
lecture at 4:15 p.m., Thursday. The
subjects he will discuss are not yet
known but they will be announced in
the Daily later in the week.
The remainder of this year's lec-
tures are as follows: Dec. 4, "Le
Theatre Comique En France Au Moy-
en-Age" by Charles A. Knudson of
the French department; Jan. 15, "L'-
Architecture Francaise Au Moyen-
Age" by Prof. Jean Hebrard of the
architectural college; Jan 29, "Le-
MoyneeD'Iberville,yLe Cid De La
Nouvelle France" by Prof. Anthony
M. Jobin of the French department;
Feb. 26, "La Vie Et L'Oeuvre De J. J.
Rousseau" by Prof. Eugene E. Rovil-
lain of the French department;
March 11, "Baudelaire Et Les Fleurs
Du Mal" by Prof. James M. O'Neil of_
the speech department; March 28,
"Jules Romains Et Las Hommes De
Bonne Volonte" by Prof. Marc Den-
kinger of the French department; and
April 28, the annual play which has
not yet been selected but which will
be shown in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Admission Tickets Required
Admission to the lectures will re-i
quire a membership ticket which may
be obtained this week for 50 cents in
Room 112, Romance Language Build-
ing. There will be a slight additional
charge for the annual play, Professor
Talamon said.
Two lectures of this series which
were delivered during the 1933-341
school year have been reprinted and1
enlarged, one by Charles E. Koella
of the French department which ap-
peared in the French Review and
the other by Prof. Antoine J. Jobin of
the French department in the Mich-
igan History Magazine.)
All lectures will be held at 4:15 p.m.
in Room 103, Romance Language
Building.
Extinction Of
Crime Sought
In Cuban Drive'
Action Follows Baring Of
Plot To Kill American
Ambassador There
HAVANA, Nov. 9.--() - An offi-
cial appeal called the people of Cuba
into a campaign to "exterminate"
criminals today after a high source
disclosed that a plot to assassinate
United States Ambassador Jefferson
Caffery had been frustrated.
The first fruits of the drive fol-
lowed at once with announcement of
the arrest of four persons accused of
planning to kidnap or kill Police
Chief Colonel Jose Pedraza.
The "master plot" against Caffery,
authorities said, was balked by Cuban
army intelligence agents on the eve
of the assassination day.
Twenty-nine men were said by
army agents to have sworn to kill
Caffery - the first intended victim
of a terrorist campaign -with the
slaying set for last Friday.
Army authorities said they be-

lieved the plot arose from a desire
by radicals to draw American inter-
vention in Cuba, thus provoking a
revolution.
With a majority of the 29 suspects
still at large, Secretary of the In-
terior Maximilian Smith summoned
all Cubans to aid a drive to "exter-
minate . . . a sect of dangerous crim-
inals . .. who must be faced as tigers,
grown vicious on the taste of human
flesh."
"It is impossible for a civilized city
to tolerate such savagery as Havana
has been suffering," he said.
"Self-preservation demands civic
cooperation. You are only asked to
watch what goes on about you and
report any suspicious occurrence at
once to the nearest police station to
make it possible to prevent acts of
terrorism that may strike those you
love."
Freshman Colleges
May Operate Again
LANSING, Nov. 9. - (/P) - Fresh-
men colleges probably will be oper-
ated again this year as part of the
Federal relief program in Michigan,
Henry J. Ponitz, educational direc-
tor, said today.
Although the regular college and
school year started almost two
months ago the relief colleges, de-
signed to provide higher education
for thousands of financially dis-
tressed persons probably will be
nnened soon for two terms of 12

First In 35 Years

1895 Classification Of College Slang
Reveals Similarities To ModernLingo'

Classified Dfrectory

I
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-Associated Press Photo.
President Roosevelt joined his
neighbors in celebrating the elec-
tion of Elmer Van Wagner (above)
as first Democratic supervisor in
Hyde Park, N. Y., in 35 years.

E. F. Greenman
Returns From
LapeerCounty
Successful Excavations At
Indian Burying Grounds
Are Concluded
Dr. Emerson F. Greenman, Univer-
sity archeologist, returned yesterday
from Lapeer County, Michigan, where
he has concluded excavations in In-
dian burying grounds located there. I
Dr. Greenman and several asso-
ciates from the University have been
digging at the location since early
last summer. Their finds consisted
chiefly of skeletons of Indians, in-
cluding some perforated skulls, and
post molds that indicated the out-
line of ancient Indian structure or
palisade that was thought to have
been a medicine lodge.
About 100 skeletons were brought
back by Dr. Greenman, including
men, women and children, found
buried in different positions.
Dr. Greenman's return was delayed
a week by the discovery of about 17
skeletons buried on top of one an-
other. The site has been completely
covered and the University will not
resume digging there next spring, Dr.
Greenman said.
All members of the expedition have
returned with the exception of Car-
man Baggerley, an amateur achae-
ologist, who discovered the burying
grounds when pieces of pottery were
turned up by a farmer's plow. He is
not connected with the University
but may enter here as a student, Dr.
Greenman said.
R. S. Millikan
Discusses Peace
In Radio Talk
"The primary prerequisite for peace
is the creation of the international
mind," Prof. Robert S. Millikan, noted
physicist, said Thursday, in a radio
speech from California.
Professor Millikan scored both the
extreme pacifist position of "complete
defenselessness" and the "radical iso-
lationist" stand as provocative of war
rather than preventing it. -He likened
the isolationist nation to the self-
centered individual who builds a wall
around himself, separating himself
from the problems of others until
those problems vitally affect him, and
who then fights to gain the most fa-
vorable position."
He warned, "There can be no ever-
lasting peace so long as our supreme
purpose is to keep out of wars rather
than to prevent them." International
peace must be enforced by institut-
ing international judicial procedure
to solve international problems, he
pointed out.
"America cannot and must not re-
sist or refuse cooperation in any plan
which aims at such international ac-
tion toward peace," he concluded.
0

1 . 7t 27

nebriation, Studiousness
Were Ridiculed By Slang
Of Gay '90'sI
(Continued from Page 1)
ious expressions were used to de-
note the hard-working students.
Nowadays we hear "Phi Bete,"
"greasy grind," "pedant," "plods,"
and "brain trust."
The compilation of Professor Scott
ites several expressions that were
common 40 years ago in describing
he student who worked and studied
hard. Some of these were "bohn"
- this probably brought about our
use of the word "boning up which
was used to refer to those studying
or an exam- "shark on stilts, and
"cooler."
Slang expressions referring to stu-
dents who were not known for their
brilliance in school work40 years ago
wiere almost as numerous as those of
today. Some of the words used in
this connection w e r e "duffer,"
'flunk," which is used very common-
ly today, "chump," and "screw."
There were also a good many words
in the pamphlet edited by Professor
Scott to express confusion or a
'muddled state of mind." "Razzle-
dazzled," "balled-up," "rattled," "fall
over oneself," and "to ascend com-
pletely up the spout," were included
in this classification.
The word "fluke" which is in very
common usage today and perhaps
even has approached the point where
it is considered proper was used wide-
ly by students in 1895. Also one ex-
pression, evidently derived from cal-
culus, and which meant a failure
to recite or that a person was con-
fused was "dy over dx."
'Botanical' Slang
Since the classification of the slang
in the article by Professor Scott waE
descriptive, there were several divi-
ion under two heads. One of the
divisions was headed by the word
"botanical." Some of the words list-
ed under this heading are easily rec-
ognizable today.
This list included "daisy," whicl
Seeks Backing
For Mackinac
StraitsBridgc
Larned Outlines Camnaigr
p- -

meant a person or thing that is ex-
cellent, charming, or admirable;
"fruit," which meant an easy course
in college - a lenient teacher - or'
one who can easily be deceived. The
expression now prevalent for an easy
course, "pipe," was not yet coined
in 1895.
Other words listed under "botan-
ical" were "peach," which also meant
one who is sweet and charming -
something that is excellent, well done,
and which is pleasing or delightful.
Perhaps the most colorful of all
expressions under this last heading
was "squash," which referred to a
foolish, "soft," fellow.
Webster Inadequate
For words to express enhursiasm
or to proclaim the elegance or fine-
ness of something the student of 40
years ago also found Webster and the
words in common usage inadequate,
and he resorted to many coinages
and slang expressions.
Some of these listed as used in 1895
were "scrumptious," "woozy," "jolly,"
and "slick," which is often heard on
the campus today. Some of these
have been carried over to the present
day and undoubtedly the present day
expressions of "ducky," "swell," and
numerous others were outgrowths of
these early expressions.
Other slang words that were pre-
dominant on the University campus
in 1895 were: "chiselly," "josh," "lu-
lu," "cussedness," "chub," "colleger,'
"deader," (a weary or exhausted per-
son), "goner," "heller," (which meant
a remarkable person. This is per-
haps a different connotation than the
word has in student usage today)
"tail-ender," "foxey," "bad egg," and
"sirrocco-sifters," which meant whis-
kers.
There are other expressions of two

or three words that were listed in
Professor Scott's pamphlet that are
still used a grat deal by all students.
For instance, "play a caged game,"l
which means to be careful to have
one's wits about one, was used 40
years ago. Also the expression "this
is no turkey raffle," is listed by Pro-
fessor Scott.
There was a great tendency for
students to modify and shorten words
by dropping syllables or simply using
the first letters of a word in con-
versation. Some of these were: "hen-
medic," (which means a female med-
ical student), "i.d.t.," which meant
"I don't think," "p.d.q." which when
translated meant pretty d-n quick,
q.t., n.g., and d.y.w.y.k., which when
defined meant "don't you wish you
knew?"
Verbs Rcmained Unchanged
Some of the other shortened words
in common usage were: "dent," for a
student of dentistry, "fash," for
"fashion," "frosh," for freshman
"howdy," for how do you do, "mun,"
for money, "phenom," for phenome-
non, "tute," for tutor, and "varsity,"
for university.,
Apparently there was not much
tendency in 1895 to change the mean-
ings of different verbs. Today we
hear frequently such phrases as "I'm
whipped," or "I'm bushed," or "I'm
sunk" and "My goose is cooked," and
"that exam got me down," but these
do not appear in Scott's pamphlet.
By studying the expressions pre-
dominant 40 years ago, it is not dif-
ficult to see that they were the foun-
dation of many of the expressions
used by students today. Also a study
I of these expressions reveals that a
number of present day slang expres-
sions were not coined in recent years
but originated many years ago.

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. Ix
FOR RENT
LOVELY THREE-ROOM furnished
apartment for rent. Best residen-
tial district. Garage included. Rea-
sonable. Call, 5524, or 7075. 103

C

CONCERT TO BE HELD NOV. 17 L
The concert to be given by the
University Little Symphony Orches-
tra, will be given at 8:15 p.m. Sun-
day, Nov. 17, in the Ethel Fountain
Hussey room of the League. This, "
is contrary to an erroneous announce- T
ment made yesterday to the effect 1121
that it would be held today.

W E 20%
by our
H R I STMAS
AY-A-WAY
PLAN
TIME SHOP
CSo. University Ave.

PUL / 7TZE R P/R/ZE NL.AY

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

CASS
THEATRE
DETROIT

ONE WEEK AT
II ONLY NOV. 25ho
STARTINGEEO:MED.&AT. T P. M
Jj MATINEES: WED. & SAT. AT 2:30 P. M.

ITH EREMITTANCE AND
* *SLF-ADDRESSED
STAMPED ENVELOPE TO
" CASSTHEATRE,DETROIT
7f oiip ~ e t;

BICYCLES -New and used for sale.
Dependable repairing. Campus Bike
Shop. Liberty and Maynard Sts.
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
A-

-"r J

j "er"

ANDERSON INMENKE
# H ODMI"

N

&f ZOE AKINS farm EDITH WHARTONS NOVEL
WED. & SAT. MATS: ORCHESTRA $2.20, BALCONY $1.65, $1.10, 55c
EVENINGS: ORCHESTRA - $2.75, BALCONY $2.20, $1.65, $1.10, 55c
ABOVE PRICES INCLUDE TAX

I-

[1

To Be Used In Pushing
$30,000,000_Project
DETROIT, Nov. 9. - (P) - Abner
E. Larned, state director ,of the na-
tional emergency council, was seek-
ing today to organize a statewide
campaign for a $30,000,000 bridge
across the Straits of Mackinac.
Larned said representatives of
tourist and development associations
will be invited to a meeting Nov. 20
in Lansing to discuss the project.
An appeal for concerted effort to ob-
tain federal and state sanctions will
be made at that time, he said.
The director termed the project the
"greatest of its kind ever conceived
in Michigan" at a meeting in the of-
fice of Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, state
PWA engineer, yesterday. He ex-,
pressed the opinion that the cost
would not be excessive, in view of the
fact that such a span or spans, link-
ing the peninsulas by way of Bois
Blanc, Round and Mackinac Islands,
"would make the scenic splendors of
the Upper Peninsula more available
to tourists, who spent $300,000,000 in
Michigan last year."
Attending the meeting yesterday
were Harvey J. Campbell, secretary
of the Detroit Board of commerce;
Charles E. Boyd, secretary of the Re-
tail Merchants association; Murray
D. Van Wagoner, state highway com-
missioner; G. Donald Kennedy, busi-
ness manager of the state highway
department; J. H. Cissel, state bridge
engineer, and J. Lee Barrett, execu-
tive vice president of the Detroit
Convention and Touris bureau.

Informer, Bored By
Job, Decides To Try
His Hand At Crime
DETROIT, Nov. 9.- (kP) - On sev-
eral occasions Detective Daniel Sul-+
livan has used the services of Louis1
Popalawski in solving various crimes,
so when Popalawski offered to lead
three suspected safecrackers into a
police trap Detective Sullivan went
so far as to give Popalawski his car.
Detective Sullivan and Detective-
Lieut. Frank Blaszak lay in wait at
an appointed hour and spot, and
nothing happened. Shortly after-
ward, however, another pair of police-
men in a scout car arrested four men
in an automobile which had just
forced another car to the curb at
Seven-Mile and Dequindre roads.
Imagine Detective Sullivan's sur-
prise when he learned Popalawski was
one of the four men, all of whom are
held on charges of attempted robbery.
"I got tired of being a stool pigeon,"
Sullivan quoted Popalawski as say-
ing as he explained he had decided
to commit a few crimes.
S.C.A. Sends Delegates
To Bluffton Conference
Four delegates from the Student
Christian Association attended the
tri-state conference of Indiana, Mich-
igan and Ohio University Y.M.C.A.'sj
held from Friday night to Sunday
noon at Bluffton, O.
These four included William O.
Warner, Grad., William Wilsnack, '37,
president of the S.C.A., Richard
Clark, '37, secretary of the S.C.A., and
William Barndt, '37. The general
purpose of the conference was to af-
ford an opportunity for exchange of
ideas and techniques in the general
work of Christian associations.
GETS 15 YEARS IN DEATH
MUNISING, Mich., Nov. 9. - (IP)-
Theodore M. Jerry, 47 years old, of
Shingleton, today faced a fifteen-to-
thirty-year term for man-slaughter
in Marquette Prison for the death of
Eliss M. Alberts, of Duluth. Mrs.
Annette LaForte, of Munising, ac-
cused with Jerry, will be tried in Jan-
uary.

Many Churches Plan
Peace Discussions
(Continued from Page 1)
be the subject of Rev. Marley's talk
at 5:30 p.m. today at the Unitarian
Church. A student buffet supper will
be served at 6:30 p.m., followed by
an address by Prof. Preston James
of the geography department on
"Jackson Hole."
The chief worship service of the
Trinity Lutheran Church will be held
at 10:30 a.m. today with the pastor,
Henry O. Yoder, delivering a sermon
on "The Impelling Power of Peace."
Sunday morning service at the
Zion Lutheran Church will be at
10:30 a.m. today. The sermon by E.
C. Stellhorn, pastor, will be on the
topic of "Polycarp and Other Rich
Poor Men.", The student fellowship
group will meet at the parish hall
at 6:30 p.m. to hear Prof. Louis Bred-
vold of the English department
speak on "The Student and his Cur-
riculum."
FIRE KILLS MAN, 40
GLADSTONE, Mich., Nov. 9.- (P)
- Nelson Cole, 40 years old, burned
to death Saturday when fire de-
stroyed his unfinished two-story
house. The body was found scrawled
in a corner of one of the rooms.

a:

MICHIGAN

LOVE SENT A GIFT OF ROSES ...
But She Thought She Wanted Orchids!
A Vino Delmar story of agirlwhose
mind was made up to marry money
'i her heart double.crossed her

------- 25c
UNTIL 2 P.M.I
TODAY

Adolph Zukor presents

A Paramount Picture Directed by Mitchell Leisen
Gues~tetr

a0

m 0

Added
The Biggest Little Show
on the Screen
MAJOR BOWES"
AMATEURS

Guest Feature
Monday at 9 P.M.
CHAS. LAUGHTON
in the Grand Comedy
"RUGGLES OF RED GAP"

NEWS

NOVELTIES

I

MAJESTIC

0"

NOW SHOWING
SHOWS CONTINUOUS SUNDAY, 1 to 11 P.M.
DON'T MISS IT !

I

LEARN
TO DANCE
Social Dancing taught
daily. Terrace Garden
Dancing Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695

I

I z --

I

A a . .

-- Today - Monday - Tuesday
SHIRLEY TEMPLE in
"CURLY TOP"
JAMES DUNN in
"WELCOME HOME"
"MUSIC LAND"
A Walt Disney Silly Symphony
Wednesday - Thursday
"Escapade" & "Mad Love"

i

I

DAILY 1:30 - 11 P.M.
W H ITN EY
15c TO 6 P.M.
Now
TWO 'FIRST-RUN
FEATURES
ELLERY QUEEN'S
"SPAN ISH
CAPE MYSTERY"
with
HELEN TWELVETREES
DONALD COOK
and
GENE AUTRY
The Singing Cowboy

.k

PLAY PRODUCTION

announces

Its Premier

P ro-

duction of the
Current Season
Reserve Now for
Shakespeare's
Twelfth

Night

EXTRA
TODD & KELLY COMEDY - "Slightly Static"
"(TTr CAT . F. " T h o A.. i...ar .,"

I

I

Ji mf w - ".

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