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November 09, 1935 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-09

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1935

'I

Doctors Do Not
Favor Practice
Of Euthanasia
Possibility Of Error In
Diagnosis Is Too Great,
Says Professor Coller
(Continued from Page 1)
est of judgment and knowledge,
which is a large assumption, there
would be basis for application of the
idea. It might, however, be subject
to abuse. It is well worthy of con-
sideration."
Dr. William M. Brace of the Health
Service expressed the belief that if
euthanasia became a law it would
have to be administered by a board
or commission appointed by the State
Medical Society or the American
Medical Association to avert serious
accidents.
"If we could be sure that such a
law would be carried out in an ideal-
istic way, it should be given very
serious consideration," Dr. Margaret
Bell of the Health Service said. She
felt, however, that we do not have
enough definite information on this
subject to map a plan or action.
Another objection is, according to
Dr. Bell, that no matter how high
the ethics of the medical profession
are, some people would take advan-
tage of such a situation. There have
been many cases, she remarked, where
a patient thought to be doomed to
a slow, painful 'death has to a con-
siderable measure regained his health.
That euthanasia should be the sub-
ject of considerable thought was ex-
pressed by Dr. Lavinia G. MacKaye,
instructor in pediatrics, but she felt
that from the standpoint of a pedia-
trician a board or commission should
decide upon anydaction taken in the
case of a child doomed to imbecility
if a euthanasia law should be passed.
She also believed that the burden
placed upon society by institutions
for the care of the mentally deficient
and incurables is not heavy enough
to necessitate the consideration of
such a law now.
Concert To Be
in League Room
Sunday Evening
U. Of M. Little Symphony
To Give Musical; Tour
Series Planned
The University Little Symphony
will present the first in a series of
Sunday evening musicales at 8:15
p.m. tomorrow in the Ethel Fountain
Hussey Room of the League. The con-
certs will be given throughout the
winter under the sponsorship of the
music committee of the League.
Fourteen assistants in instru-
nental instruction in the School of
Music compose the Little Symphony,
which was organized a year ago and
has since given a number of concerts
on the campus. Early this year the
group made a successful concert tour
through several states, and a second
tour covering 20 states will be made
this winter.
Ruby Peinert, Grad., will be violin-
cello soloist with the group in the
first concert tomorrow night and will
play Popper's "Hungarian Rhapsody."
The symphony will be under the di-
rection of Thor Johnson, and Ro-
mine Hamilton will act as concert-
master.
Students, faculty, and local resi-
dents are invited to attend. There
is no admission charge.

Complete Plans
For Armistice
DayProgram
Talks By Leading Citizens
And Peace Day Parade
Scheduled By Legion
Ann Arbor will observe Armistice
Day with ceremonies beginning at 11
a.m. Monday in Hill Auditorium.
The Rev. George J. Cairns, of Mon-
roe, American Legion chaplain for
the Department of Michigan, will be
the principal speaker of the Legion-
sponsored program. The invocation
and benediction will be given by the
Rev. Allison Ray Heaps of the Con-
gregational Church and the Rev. Fr.
Allen Babcock of St. Mary's Student
Chapel, respectively.
E. William Doty, instructor in the
School of Music, will provide an or-
gan program. Harold Golds, local
attorney, will act as master of cere-
monies.
A parade in which five military and
two other organizations will partici-
pate .has been arranged by Albert G.
Larmee, commander of the local
American Legion post and general
chairman of the Armistice Day exer-
cises.
The marchers will include the
Spanish War Veterans, Company K

Ftna That $
Lansing Liquor Stock Low
But Officials Fail To Find
RequestTo Replenish It
LANSING, Nov. 8.- (R) -The State
liquor control commission wearied it-
self today with a new variation of the
ancientngame of "button, button."
"Where," demanded Chairman
John S. McDonald of various em-
ployes marshaled before him, "is that
$97,000 bid for our light wine stock?
And who is Mr. Michaels?"
With tiresome regularity the an-
swer came to both questions, "I don't
know."
Chairman McDonald announced
following Tuesday's commission
meeting that a "Mr. Michaels" of New
York had submitted a successful bid
of $97,000 for the state's complete
light wine stock, which cost the com-
mission $350,000.
Asked today who "Mr. Michaels"
is, McDonald summoned Walter A.
Rice, attorney employed by the com-
mission, to answer. Rice said he
didn't know. McDonald asked to see
the bid, and Rice said he didn't have
it.
McDonald called Michael E. Car-
penter, head of the alcohol control
division, to his office and repeated the
questions - and Carpenter repeated
the answers. Gilbert H. Isbister, sec-
retary of the commission, stood four-
square on the same' answers.
McDonald insisted the last time he
saw the bid was when Joseph Schles-
singer, a commission employe, had it
in his hand and was leading the un-
identified "Mr. Michaels' 'toward the

Greek Royalists Stage Demonstration

-Associated Press Photo.
The elections to determine whether the monarchy would be restored
in Greece was a sign for royalists to stage long and hearty demonstra-
tions for King George 11. An almost unanimous vote for the exiled
leader was recorded.
State Liquor Commission caen't
I f~f~ --~I1~fI~' ~II~h W .!~ f)

7 i, 1UwineD BiD
Schlessinger declared he had never
seen the bid and does not know who
Mr. Michaels is. The chairman de-
clared he would investigate the bidder'
before signing any contract and
would require him to prove that he
represents a reputable firm and will
not sell the wine in Michigan.
Rice told the chairman he under-
stood Michaels intended to form a
company to sell the wine in Mich-
igan. Isbister said Michaels was ac-
companied to the commission by sev-
eral friends, apparently interested in
the outcome of Michaels' bid.
The commission has not received a
deposit on the bid. None of the wine
has been delivered. McDonald ad-
mitted the commission wouldhnot
know where to deliver it. The chair-
man intimated that the bid --if it is
found - may be rejected.
J. J. Sugarman, Inc., of Los An-
geles, Calif., submitted a bid of $94,-
000 for the wine and met a rejection.
The bid was raised Wednesday to
$110,000, but McDonald ruled the
bidding had closed.
The wine, all under 16 per cent
alcoholic content, cannot be sold
through commission stores, McDon-
ald said, and the commission is will-
ing to accept a loss and clear its
shelves.
Padelf ord To
Give Sermon
Here Sunday
Dr. Frank W. Padelford, secretary
of the Northern Baptist Board of
Education, will speak Sunday morn-
ing at the worship hour at the First
Baptist Church and will meet various
groups later for conference on edu-
cation.
His engagements include a confer-
ence with the Baptist student lead-
ers, the Sunday morning sermon at
the church and a conference with the
young people's group of High School
age. On Monday with Rev. R. E.
Sayles pastor of the church and Mr.
A. E. Chapman, student worker, he
will attend a luncheon at the Ply-
mouth Baptist Church arranged for
the pastors of the Wayne Association
and their wives.
The closing conference will be held
in connection with a supper at the
Ann Arbor Baptist Church to which
all parents of young people of the
local churches and from the sur-
rounding towns have been invited. In
all the gatherings higher education
will be stressed.
Dr. Padelford comes to Ann Arbor
from Pontiac where he met a large
group of young people last evening.
While in Ann Arbor he will be a guest
of Rev. Howard R. Chapman and
Mrs. Chapman at the Roger Williams
guild house.
THOMAS SHEPPERD DIES
LEBANIN, Ind., Nov. 8. - (P) -
Thomas S. Shepperd, 54, widely
known engineer who was in charge of
the drilling of a 19 mile $12,000,000
tunnel through the Catskill moun-
tains to carry a water supply to
New York City, died last night.

Prof. Worrell
Will Speak On
Islamic People1
Sponsored By Islamic Art
Seminary; Lecture To Be
Held In Alumni Hall
Prof. William Worrell of the de-
partment of Oriental Languages and
Literature will speak in the first of a.
series of lectures sponsored by the'
Research Seminary in Islamic Art at
4:15 p.m. Monday in Rocm D of
Alumni Memorial Hal.
The lectures, which are open to the
public, are all concerned with the
subject of Islamic art and civilization.
The subject of Dr. Worrell's talk is'
"Islamic Civilization."
The program for the remainder of
the series is as follows: on Dec. 9,
Mrs. Adele C. Weibel, curator of tex-
tiles at the Detroit Institute of Art.
will discuss "Islamic Textiles of the
Middle Ages," and on Jan. 13, Dr.
Clarke Hopkins, associate professor of
Latin and Greek, and director of the
recent Yale excavations in the Near
East, will speak on "The Excavations
at Dura-Europos."
On Feb. 24, Prof. Leroy Waterman,
also of the department of Oriental
Languages and Literature, will speak
on "Old Mesopotamian Art"; on
March 9, Prof. Enoch E. Peterson,
director of the University excava-
tions in Egypt, will discuss "The Uni-
versity of Michigan Excavations in
Egypt; and on April 27, Dr. Mehmet
Aga Oglu, associate professor of the
History of Islamic Art, will speak on
"Islamic Decorative Art."
On May 11, Dr. Arthur E. R. Boak,
professor of Ancient History, will
discuss "Byzantine Civilization, Its
Character and Influence." All of the
lectures will be held at 4:15 p.m. in
Room D of the Alumni Memorial
Hall.
John Russell,
10 OtherssDie
In Hurricane
NASSAU, Bahamas, Nov. 8. -(P)--
The reports reaching the capital of
the Bahamas today said Commission-
er John Eldridge Russell and 10 oth-
er persons were drowned when hurri-
cane winds swept the island Sunday.
Five vessels of the sponge fishing
fleet were destroyed, it was reported,
while three others were badly dam-
aged.
Other property damage was said to
have been small.
The hurricane was the same that
lashed Miami Monday, causing sev-
eral deaths in the Miami area and do-
ing property damage set at $3,000,-
000.
It passed over Great Abaco, where
the drownings occurred, just after
changing its course from south to
west southwest.
PLEADS NOT GUILTY
John Hunget, 3154 Rosedale, Platt,
pleaded not guilty to charges of reck-
less driving in Judge Reading's jus-
tice court yesterday. Bond, unfur-
nished, was set at $200 and the exam-
ination date was scheduled for Nov.
13.

Car Is Catapaulted
Into Freight Train
A 1935 Model Essex Terraplane was
completely demolished early yester-
day morning when it was struck by a
freight train near the Foster station
crossing of the Michigan Central
Railroad.
Roy Boshaw, Milner Hotel, was
driving south on the Foster road
when a rear tire blew out. The ex-
plosion threw the car about 20 feet
from the road and onto the rail-
road tracks. The passengers at-
tempted to flag the oncoming train
but failed. The only method of warn-
ing the engineer was the lighting of
matches. There was no time to start
a signal fire.
Seek Robbers
Of Mail Train
In North Ohio
Thieves Steal Securities
From Railroad Car After
Sub-Machine Gun Raid
GARRETTSVILLE, O., Nov. 8. -
(/P) - A widespread search, one of the
most extensive in recent northern
Ohio history, was under way today
after six mail car robbers seized $34,-
000 in currency and $12,450 in secur-
ities at the Erie railroad station here.
With every movement carefully
planned, the gang held up more than
a dozen persons, covering them with
sub-machine guns and pistols soon
after train No. 626 stopped yesterday
afternoon.
The engineer, fireman and mem-
bers of the mail car crew were ordered
onto the station platform alongside
men and women bystanders. Pouches
containing the money were thrown
out of the car, to be carried by two
victims to the gang's automobile.
One shot was fired, which grazed the
forehead of Orlin Workman, a mail
clerk.
In a small sedan, apparently pur-
chased expressly for the robbery, the
gang fled toward Ravenna. The
search today, in which United States
postal inspectors and police took the
lead, was centered in the larger
northern Ohio cities, Akron, Cleve-
land, Warren, Youngstown and Can-
ton.
The currency was consigned to the
Warren, O., Second National bank for
use in meeting a payroll of the Re-
public Steel corporation. The robbers
knew exactly what they were after,
for one of them shouted: "Where's
that other bag that was put on in
Cleveland- the one from the Federal
Reserve bank?"
CITY HALL TO CLOSE
All offices in the City Hall, with
the exception of the police depart-
ment, will be closed on Armistice Day,
Monday, Nov. 11, it was announced
yesterday by Mayor Robert Camp-
bell.

THEOSOPHIST WILL SPEAK
E. Norman Pearson, nationally
known authority in the field of the-
osophy, and former president of the
Michigan Theosophical Federation,
addressed the weekly meeting of the
Ann Arbor Theosophical Society on
the subject of "The Ancient Wisdom
and the Natural Life" at 8 p.m. last
night at the Michigan League Chapel.

i

MICHIGAN
NOW

SAVE 20%
by our
CHRISTMAS
LAY -A -WAY
PLAN
The TIME SHOP
1121 So. University Ave.

' Class' 'ed Directory

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'II

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WHETHER IT'S MOTHER AND DAD,
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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
BICYCLES - New and used for sale.
Dependable repairing. Campus Bike
Shop. Liberty and Maynard Sts.
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x

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LAUNDRY
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The Red Cross Needs You.
All You -Need s a er
and a Dollar.
Memberships received at Roll Call
Headquarters, 207 East Huron.

First Ann Arbor
ART CINEMA
presents

Showing!
LEAGUE

commission wine cellars
what he had bought.
was summoned next.

to show him
Schlessinger

"The

Clear Site Of New
Graduate School
Razing of private houses prepara-
tory to the erection of the new Grad-
uate School has been begun in the
block behind the League.
Houses in this block, which is
bounded by Ingalls, Huron, Twelfth
and Washington streets, have been
sold, some separately and others in
groups, with their fixtures to various
wreckers.
Completion of the razing work is
expected by Jan. 1, and the excava-
tion for the school can be started im-
mediately thereafter. However, re-
moval of foundations and filling of
cisterns and wells -jobs not per-
formed by the wreckers - must be
accomplished by the excavator.
Secord Announces New
Debate Squad Schedule
The winter schedule for the Varsity
debating squad was announced yes-
terday by Dr. Arthur Secord, coach.
On Dec. 13, the men's squad will
meet Wisconsin at Madison, taking
the negative, and the next opponent
will be Illinois. The latter debate
will be held at Ann Arbor on a date
not yet determined, with Michigan
taking the positive side.
The women's squad will meet In-
diana here and Purdue at Lafayette
on Feb. 27.

This Space Donated by
ANN ARBOR SAVINGS BANK

III

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