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November 08, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

v

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,

Williams Students Satirize Teachers Oath Bill

Detroit To See
'36 Auto Styles
Next Saturday
Twenty-Five Corporations
Scheduled To Display
New Models
Three and one-half acres of "mir-
ror-polished" automobiles, their sur-
faces reflecting the subdued colors of
elaborate display lighting and the
inquisitive faces of thousands upon
thousands of 1935's "more-enthusias-
tic-than-ever" motor public - such is
the spectacle promised for the De-
troit Automobile Show, which opensI
at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Convention
Hall.
Manufacturers of 25 different
makes of automobiles and 9 makes
of trucks have reserved space for the
eight-day run of the auto show. Vis-
itors may inspect the motor kingdom
from the lowliest vassal to the most
dignified courtier.
Something For Everyone
The more persistently curious will
inspect the large arrays of technical
exhibits, the "just-ordinarily" curious
will watch the movies of productive
processes-and perhaps linger awhile
before the "fall fashion show" and
the "living models" presented there-
in. The "kiddies" will see little play-
lets of Buck Rogers and Wilma Deer-
ing, recently returned from inter-
planetary meanderings.
The majority of visitors, however,
will be coming to "see what's new"
in the 1936 cars. They will find im-
provements, but no important tech-
nical changes.
Have New Riding Comfort
One of the auto concerns has
equipped its new cars with two com-
plete braking systems, one of the
hydraulic type functioning in every-
day service as the regular means of
stopping the car, and the other a
complete mechanical system, held in
reserve in case of emergency.
Increased riding comfort has been
added through further developments
in springing and in improved weight
distribution. Many of the new mo-
dels have further supplemented rid-
ing ease by the use of deeper, softer
seat cushions and by mounting the
body on rubber, instead of the former
metal-to-metal mounting.
Safety features include more of the
new modes with steel tops and
frames re-designed for added rigidity.
Perhaps the most noticeable of im-

Ralph Clark Is
NamedToHead
FroshSingers
Shirrel Kasle, '37, Will Be
Conductor And Manager
Of Glee Club;
Ralph Clark, Jr., of Ann Arbor, was
elected president of the Frosh Glee
Club yesterday for the school year of
1935-36.
Other officers who were selected in-
clude Charles Zwick of Cleveland
Heights, vice-president; Thomas
Draper of Perry, N. Y., secretary; and
Gray Nelson of Ann Arbor and Rob-
ert F. Read of Pinkney, librarians.
As student conductor, Shirrel Kasle,
'37, a member of the Varsity. Glee
Club will have supervision of the ac-
tivities of this organization. These
will include the furnishing of the
singing at the Freshman luncheon
Tuesday at Dean Joseph Bursley's
luncheon soon, and the presenting of
smokers and sings with faculty mem-
bers as guests, at times to be ar-
ranged. The club, which trains its
members for the Varsity Glee Club,
will also exchange sings with that or-
ganization, Kasle said.
The leader for this school year is
Ernest O. Bacz, of Northville, and the
accompanists are Paul J. Kent, of
Johnstown, Pa., and Earl Kowalko,
of Toledo. The director is Prof. David
Mattern of the School of Music.

Ilassified ]Drector
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES LOST AND FOUND
MAC'S TAXI--4289. Try our effi- LOST: Elgin silver watch with gold
cient service. All new cabs. 3x chain, knife. Taiu Beta Pi key.
Phone 8959. Reward. 98
LAUNDRY

STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.j
Careful work at low price. 1x

ruKr I T1mr
LOWEST PRICES
PROGRAMS, BIDS, STATIONERY
THE ATHENS PRESS
Downtown, North of Postoffice

III It's a Week-End of Dances

MEN-

C

Send her a corsage to wear at the dance. Have it
something aside from the ordinary. Our corsages
are unusual in their individuality.
GIRLS-
For your dormitory and sorority dances. Let us
furnish you with floral decorations in the form of
artistic bowl arrangements.
University Flower Shop
Opposite Michigai Theatre Phone 9055
WE DELIVER

-Associated Press Photo.
While faculty members of Williams College at Williamstown, Mass.,
were taking an oath of allegiance to the state and national constitu-
tions, students at the college unfurled a large swastika flag and paraded
merrily about the campus to the music of a fife, goose-stepping as they
went, in a burlesque on the state teachers' oath law.
Art Cinema League Shows Its
First American Film Tonight

..

provements in body design are th
die-cast radiator grilles which ar
"sported" by most of the new model.
Automobile executives expect a 2
per cent increase in production du
ing the forthcoming year, which,
the basis of an estimated 3,700,00
outputthis year, would bring th
1936 total to approximately 4,700,00
vehicles.

Le
Is.
20
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1e
DO

PRICES
MAT. & BALC. EVENINGS - 25c MAJESTIC
MAIN FLOOR EVENINGS - 35c - LAST TIMES TODAY -
MI RIAM HOPKINS -EDW. G. ROBINSON in
cBARBARY COAST"
SPECIAL METRO NEWS showing of Outstanding Shots of
Last Saturday's Ohio State-Notre Dame Football Game!

The dramatization of the Sein Fein.
rebellion comes to the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theater tonight. "The In-
former," starring Victor McLaglen
will continue to Saturday evening as
the third offering of the Art Cinema
League.
The film, first American produc-
tion to be shown by the League this
season, was selected according to
Professor Harold J. McFarlan, chair-
man of the League's faculty board,
"because the campus has almost be-
sieged us with requests for the pic-
ture. We do not usually bring other
than foreign films, but from my own
observations and the newspaper re-
views we feel justified in showing the
picture.
Photograph Startling
"Photography as a live art is most
startling in "The Informer," Profes-
sor McFarlan continued, "and it has
been only our resolve to limit our-
selves to foreign pictures which has
kept it from Ann Arbor so.long."
The film was made in the streets
of Dublin. Victor McLaglen is a Sein
Feiner who has informed the British
troops of his outlawed countrymen's
headquarters during the Irish revolu-
tion. He takes money for his deed
and through his weakness he causes
the shooting of his friend.
Has Dramatic Sequence
Throughout the notices which the
picture has received there has been
one fact consistently noticed, Pro-
2 Will Attend Naval
Architects' Session
Prof. Henry C. Adams and Prof.
Louis A. Baier of the naval archi-
tecture and marine engineering de-
partment will attend the annual con-
vention of the Society of Naval Archi-
tects and Marine Engineers, to be
held in New York the latter part of
next week, it was learned yesterday.
Professor Baier will deliver a paper
entitled "The Resistance and Wake
of a Tanker Model" at the Thursday
session. The data with which the
paper will deal has been taken largely
from experimental observations in the
naval tank, Professor Baier stated.
DENKINGER SPEAKS
Prof. Marc Denkinger of the French
department addressed the Alliance
Francaise of Kalamazoo yesterday on
"Jules Romains-Les Hommes de
Bonne Volonte."
DAILY 1:30 TO 11 P.M.
WHITNEY
15c TO 6 --25c AFTER 6
NOW

fessor McFarlan said. "There is an
incident where McLaglen's friend is
shooting it out with the British
searchers. He is kneeling on the sill
of an open window firing away, when
he is shot. There is silence then,
and the dying man slowly slides
through the window. The camera
is right behind him here and it is
focused on him as he moves. He
grasps the stone window sill. You
can hear his breathing through the
silence and as he loses his grip you
can hear the scratching of his finger
nails as he tries with all his strength
to keep himself from falling."
Minnesota Doctor
To Lecture Today
Dr. J. Arthur Meyers, professor of
preventative medicine in the Uni-
versity of Minnesota, will give an ad-
dress at 4 p.m. today in the amphi-
theatre of the West Medical Build-
ing. His subject will be "Changing
Trends of Diagnosis of Childhood
Tuberculosis and Its Relation to Tu-
berculosis in Schools."
Dr. Meyers, who is considered one
of the country's leading men in his
field, is general director of the Lyman
Hurst School of Tuberculosis, and
chief of the chest clinic of the Uni-
versity of Minnesota. His talk wil]
be illustrated with slides and is open
to the public.
GRADUATE DEANS LEAVE
Dean Clarence S. Yoakum and As-
sistant Dean Peter G. Okkelberg, both
of the graduate school, left Ann Ar-
bor Wednesday to attend the confer-
ence of the American Association of
Universities assembling at Cornel]
University.

BUY YOUR FRUITS,
GROCERIES & VEGETABLES
at the
FARM MARKET
Open Evenings and Sundays
320 EastnLiberty Phone 9778
TODAY and SATURDAY
JANET GAYNOR
"THE FARMER TAKES
A WIFE"
Sybil Jason, Glenda Farrell
"LITTLE BIG SHOT"
Adventures of Tarzan, No. 9
- Sunday - Monday - Tuesday -
"CURLY TOP" and
"WELCOME HOME'

TOMORROW IS THE DAY
HIDDEN DRAMA GRAND OPERA'S
DIAMOND HORSESHOE NEVER SEES
DARRYL F ZANUCK
20th CENTURY PRODUCTION
o-
Also - TODD & KELLY COMEDY -- "CHIC" SAL E - NEWS

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First Ann Arbor Showing!
ART CINEMA LEAGUE
presents
"The
Informer"
with VICTOR McLAGLEN
*.*t** N Y. TIMES
I- ESQUIRE
VANITY FAIR
LIBERTY
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
Tonight and Saturday
NOVEzAMBER 8 -9
Tickets 35c - All Seats Reserved
Also - Two Short Subjects

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SMICHIGAN

1I

Tell us you need $300, $200,
$100 or so-and in 24 hours
the cash will be ready for you
Repay us in small monthly
instalments out of your regu
ar income. Take up to 20
months, if necessary.

49

on

>ossac

i

Russian

Chorus

t

SERGE

JAROFF, Conductor

- EXTRA
O.S.U. vs. NOTRE DAME
FOOTBALL VIEWS
Comedy - - Cartoon - - Oddity

First Ann Arbor Showing!
ANN RUTHERFORD
"WATERFRONT
LA DY"
and
DICK POWELL
"BROADWAY
GON DOL ER"
Extra
CARTOON NEWS

Monday, Nov. 11, at 8:15P. M.
ri ====== =H ILL AUDITOR IUM

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WHEN YOU
SOMETHING

WANT SOMETHING REALLY TASTY-
COOKED RIGHT-

Drop in at the
PILG~I'-0M "SHOP
OUR SPECIALITIES
WAFFLES ... smothered in Syrup and
Melted Butter . .. 20c

1

THE DON COSSACK RUSSIAN MALE CHORUS is unique,
from the standpoints both of origin and of accomplish-
ment. Prisoners of war when the Russian Imperial forces were
overcome, they "whiled away their time" in a prison camp by
singing simple choral music. Then under the magnetic influ-
ence of their diminutive but dynamic leader, SERGE JAROFF,
they undertook more serious music. Without music books or
instruments, they attempted to substitute for an army band.
They attracted the attention of their captors and were ex-
tended some few courtesies. After their release they could not
return to their native land because they had been expatriated.
As a group they did "church singing" in one of the Balkan
cathedrals and soon were in demand for concerts. Their tours
spread throughout central Europe with ever-increasing en-
thusiasm. Their short trips to America on several occasions
have been in the nature of triumphal marches. Their pro-
grams of sacred music, folk tunes, and stirring soldier songs
of the "Cossacks on the March," appeal to the discriminating
musician as well as to the general public.

lii __________________

-

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I

BLUE RIBBON COAL CO.

IC

DOUGHNUTS... that will melt in your
mouth. Take some home at 2c dozen.
HAMBURGERS . . . the best you've

IU

11

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