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November 05, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMIER 6, 1M35

Six Seriously

Injured When Electric Car Overturns

Annual Red Cross Veteran Employe REAL ESTATE GROUP MEETS
Members of the Michigan Real Es-
Drive Opens Today Observes Birthday tate Association will meet at 7 p.m.
Thursday in the Michigan Union for
The annual Red Cross Roll Call Observing his seventy-sixth birth- a banquet which opens the 21st an-
in Washtenaw County opens today, day yesterday, Albert Marsh, who nualconvention of the group.
:Addresses and discussions will be
and will continue through November ended 46 years of continuous em- held at the banquet and will continue
20, it was announced yesterday by ployment in the anatomy division of through Friday afternoon, when the
Mrs. Albert C. Furstenberg who has the Medical School last June, stated session adjourns.
charge of the drive, the goal of which that he was celebrating by taking it -_
has been set at a membership of 4,000 easy. "It'stthe only way to do."

persons.
A number of shops in Ann Arborj
will carry special window displays
during the drive, and all of the dairies
will use milk bottle collars with the
Red Cross slogan on them.
From November 6 to 20, there will
be a lighted red cross in the Court
House square, and posters will be
placed on all of the city busses
throughout the drive.
The heads of the committees which
will participate in the drive are: T. R.
Piersol, special gifts, Miss Irene
Smith, schools, Maynards Newton
and Earl Cress, business groups, H. S.
Slifer, fraternities, Mrs. Russell T.
Dobson, Jr., house-to-house, Frank
DeVine, factories, Mrs. George Moe,
booths, D. E. Conley, churches and
Mrs. Jean Noble, supplies.

Mr. Marsh was born in England S LC A L !
and has resided in the United States E A
for the last 52 years. The celebra- PORK AN D
tion was limited only to the family.
SA ERKRAUT
i with PLATE LUNCH

MILLER
Drug Store
727 North University
Phone 9797
Features Today
50c PROPHYLACTIC
TOOTH BRUSH 29c

with SPATZEN
25c
PANCAKES
Just Like Mother Made.
Open 7 A.M. to 8:30 P.M.
Table and Counter Service
0
Aunt Het's
513 East William

g

-Associated Press Photo.
Six persons were seriously hurt and a score of oth-srs suffered minor injuries when a Lrake Shore Electric

L

inter-city car crashed into an automobile several mijes east of Toledo,
injured required hospital attention.

0., and overturned.. Many of the

11111111111==1

r 1

Clements Rare Book Room Is
Beautiful But Very Utilitarian
Valuable Collections Are Shelburne, whose portrait occupies
Housed In Burglar- And the center position above the fire
place of the rare book room, is consid-
Fire-Proof Vault ered an important part of the collec-
tion. The Earl of Shelburne was
By I. S. SILVERMAN known as one of the most forceful
Priceless old volumes, comfortably English proponents of America inde-
reposing amidst hand-carved wood pendence and his works form the
I paneling and old English' furniture basis for many existent theories con-
1 complementing the nature of the cerning the American revolution.
room, but guarded by strictly utili- A famous document included in the
tarian burglar-proof and fire-proof collection is the noted Columbus let-
walls of steel, give the William L. ter written in Latin in 1493 and pub-
Clements Library's rare book room lished by Stephen Plannek. The first
its distinctive mien. edition of the Federalist in its or-
The outward appearance of the iginal board binding, published in
room does not suggest its significance Philadelphia in 1788, is another ex-
and value, but its structure bears out tremely important document owned
its importance. The room has an by the library.
individual foundation of steel reen-
forced with concrete thus insuring its Yost Ta in Will
stability against all conditions. Steel- T p g
curtained windows, massive portals, Attend Dinner Soon
and intricate locks guard the valuable
collection of books. Fielding H. Yost and T. Hawley'
Begun By Clements 'apping will attend a University of
An early foundation for the present Michigan alumni dinner to be held
selection of books laid by the late Yriday night at the Hamilton Club,
Regent William L. Clements, who was Chicago, before the Michigan-Illinois
noted for his interest in the collection football game. Mr. Tapping will leave,
of rare books, library officials said. for Champaign following the dinner
Within the cases the books are where he will set up headquarters for!
chronologically arranged as much as Michigan supporters at the Inman
size of the volumes will allow. There hotel,
are also special groups such as well- _
rounded Mather, and Revolutionary GUEST SPEAKER ANNOUNCED
materialy Millard 11. Pryor, vice-president of
One may proceed from one case to the Renown Stove Co., will be guest
another and acquire comprehensive speaker at a professional meeting of
picture of American history according Delta Sigma Phi, professional busi-
to the order of events. It is complete ness fraternity at 7:30 p.m. today at
in the sense that several volumes re- 1502 Cambridge Road.
late to one historical issue but present
various aspects and views which serve
as the best available source material.
It is also significant to note that 39 of
the 41 known Jesuit "Relations" are
owned by the library. TYPEWF
Cannot Be Evaluated RE NI
It would be folly to evaluate the
individual books as being more im-
portant or more valuable than the
rest, library officials say, because of SPECIAL RATES
the abundance and importance of the
entire collection. However, several of ALL MA K ES A
the volumes are more famous than
others and some are more frequently
quoted or written about. New Portable and best qu
An entire case in the rare 'book
room is filled with DeBry publications A large and select stock in a
which were the main interest of the applyopUr
late Regent Clements. DeBry was a ent may onp
continental publisher during the six-
teenth and seventeenth centuries who
immortalized the paintings of the
Roanoke colony made by John White.
His publications are of great signifi-
cance and importance in American 0 oM
history and the library contains one 314 South S
of the most complete collections of
his works, according to those in THE STATIONERY ANI
charge.
In addition a comprehensive col- Since 1908 If You Write,
lection of the papers of the Earl of

Hope Is Given
For Restrictions
B Fitzgerald
Assurance was given a delegation
of Washtenaw Avenue property own-
ers yesterday by Gov. Frank D. Fitz-
gerald that the establishment of the
Michigan Children's Institute on the
Hoover property would be discussed
with George R. Thompson, budget di-
rector, before further action is taken.
The property owners are protesting
the establishment of the Institute
in the highly restricted residential
area around the Hoover property.
A proposed change in the city's
zoning ordinance to permit the state
to go ahead with its plan was de-
scribed by Prof. W. C. Hoad, of
the engineering college, and Dr. S. W.
Donaldson, members of the delega-
tion, as detrimental to the whole
community.
A friendly suit against zoning
changes was suggested by Gov. Fitz-
gerald, who pointed out that should
the state lose, condemnation awards
would prevent the establishment of
the Institute on the Hoover property.
The delegation's spokesmen replied
that, while ready to fight for deed
restrictions, they were reluctant to
defend the zoning ordinance also.
BUY YOUR FRUITS,
GROCERIES & VEGETABLES
at the
FARM MARKET
Open Evenings and Sundays
320 East Liberty Phone 9778
RITERS S 6I
T E D

Seniors,
Make Your Appointments
NOW
For Your Ensian
Plhotog raphs
PHOTOGRAPHER
332 SOUTH STATE STREET - DIAL 5031

I

r

0

TO STUDENTS
AN D MODELS

tality Office Typewriters.
a complete range of prices.
chase. Easy payments.
Work a Specialty.
State Street
D TYPEWRITER STORE
We Have It Phone 6615

10,000 footcandles
Upwards of 1,000
I:4'
500 footcan'dles

NE "footcandle" (the unit used to measure light) is the
amount of light cast on a screen by a candle one foot
away. Sunlight measures about 10,000 footcandles. Too
bright, perhaps, for comfortable reading but not bad at all
for playing golf. The intensity in the shade of the old apple
tree may be 1,000 footcandles or more. Ideal for reading.
Easy on the eyes. A great place for an afternoon of reading.
We enjoy sitting on the porch--a nice place to use our eyes
-with perhaps 500 footcandles.
We sit inside during the daytime, pull our chair close to the
window and think we have good light. Yes, it is reasonably
good-200 footcandles. Then at night, when many of us use
our eyes more than in the daytime for close vision, we blithely
turn on a 40-watt bulb in a bridge lamp and proceed to read
our newspapers under a lighting intensity of 3 to 5footcandles!
Here we are, doing close visual work with a hundred times
less light than we have in the shade of a tree-the ideal
intensity for reading.
The amount of light you need depends upon what you are
doing.
The larger the object, the easier for us to see it. Then there
is contrast. If you read a well printed book under, let us
say, 25 footcandles, and then pick up a newspaper wherein
the contrast of the type on the paper is not nearly so high,
how much light do you require? You require three times as
much light to read with the same ease. Sewing, the most
brutal visual task, generally deals with very small objects and
materials of very little contrast, and requires tremendously
high intensities if we are not to strain our eyes or consume
too much energy.
When you use your eyes for reading, sewing, studying, play.
ing games, writing, or other close visual work, there are cer-
tain minimum amounts of light you must have for proper
seeing conditions. These standards, developed by the Science
of Seeing, are based on thousands of actual experiments.

P

BOEKS which should be of interest to
MUSICIANS and MUSIC LOVERS

Burney: A GENERAL HISTORY OF MUSIC, 2 volumes.
Oscar Thompson: HOW TO UNDERSTAND MUSIC.
John Erskine: A MUSICAL COMPANION ........ .
Stokowski: THE LAYMAN'S MUSIC BOOK ....... .
O'Connell: THE VICTOR BOOK OF THE SYMPHONY.
Richard Specht: BEETHOVEN AS HE LIVED .....
Theodore Finney: A HISTORY OF MUSIC ...... .
Eric Clarke: MUSIC IN EVERYDAY LIFE ..... .
Philip Goepp: GREAT WORKS OF MUSIC -- HOW TO LISTEN TO
AND ENJOY THEM.
Ernest Newman: STORIES OF THE GREAT OPERAS AND
THEIR COMPOSERS ...................
Pratt: THE HISTORY OF MUSIC.... . .
David Ewen: COMPOSERS OF TODAY - A Biographical and Critical
Guide to Modern Composers 4... . .

$7.50
2.75
3.00
2.75
3.50
2.00
3.75
3.00

1.59
1.47
3.00

200 footcandtes
L .O IA

11

4.50

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