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October 30, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1935

Shubert's Loves
In Art Cinema
By ARTHUR A. MILLER 1
After the latest of the Art Cinema
League's private films screenings, it
was decided to bring "Unfinished
Symphony" to the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theater for exhibitions next
Friday and Saturday evenings.
Members of the League have seen
foreign movies privately since the
beginningofthe semester but not
since "Man of Aran" was shown have
they unanimously concurred in the
suitability of a film as they have
in "Unfinished Symphony."
The picture was produced by Gau-
mont-British. It is the story of
Franz Shubert's life and with the
playing of the B-minor symphony,
Ave Maria and others of the com-
poser's works, it is said to do the
master full justice.
Shubert is played by Hans Jaray
and from the likenesses available
of the composer, Jaray might very
well be a reincarnated Shubert.
Celebration For
Homecoming Is
This Week-End
Pep Meeting, Unveiling Of
Pictures, Decorations
Are Features
(Continued from Page 1)
Union, after which they will march
down State Street to the Stadium,
accompanied by the corps of Varsity
cheerleaders.
Saturday night, the Athletic As-
sociation will fete Michigan sports
writers at a dinner in the Union, as-
sociation officials announced last
night.
Dixon called attention to the fact
that Mr. Baird is commonly credited
with having built up the Michigan
athletic plant to its present point,
where it is considered the finest in the
country.
"Always an active alumnus, a bene-
factor to the University through both
his time and his money, it is only fit-
ting that the "M" Club give M.
Baird his due honor," Dixon said. He
urged students to attend the cere-
mony in the Union and follow the
band to the station.
Nearly 60,000 persons are expected
to attend the Homecoming game Sat-
urday afternoon, officials at the Ath-
letic Association's ticket office said.
The game will not only be colorful
from the standpoint of a fierce grid-
iron fight, they pointed out, but also
because of the fact that the gaudily-
outfitted Pennsylvania band, noted
throughout the East as an outstand-
ing musical organization, will parade
on the field between halves.

Are Displayed

Social Science

's

Latest Picture Council Offers

Helen Chandler is the first love of
Shubert during the days when he had
to pawn his belongings at her fath-
er's shop.
The locale of the picture is Vienna,
where Shubert lived, and Hungary
where Marta Eggerth, his second love,
spent her days in her father's feudal
mansion.
Miss Eggerth portrays the part of
a countess who has disrupted Shu-
bert's debut by laughing during his
playing of his B-minor symphony at
a fashionable Vienna salon. This
break in his performance occurs at
the juncture where he is conceiving
a new ending for his symphony and
from then until he realizes his love
for the countess he is unable to com-
plete his work.
With due credit to the acting in
"Unfinished Symphony," the music
which is supplied by the Vienna Phil-
harmonic Orchestra and the singing
of the famous Vienna Boys Choir,
overshadows all the rest. Miss Eg-
gerth is a member of the Vienna
Opera Company and her singing,
combined with her dancing, especial-
ly during the scene in a Hungarian
tavern, is said to be refreshing, com-
ing as it does through the medium
of the screen.
Throughout the picture there is no
trace of Hollywood's "playing up"
to the musical sequences. Reviewers
state that Jaray, as Shubert, is con-'
vincing and when an unseen orches-
tra blends with his piano offerings
it is "more like a stream of fin-
ished music flowing through his mind
than an inserted accompaniment."
According to Prof. Harold J. Mc-
Farlan of the engineering college,
chairman of the League's faculty
board, the showing of "Unfinished
Symphony" was not "entirely expect-
ed." For Professor McFarlan declared
that if "Man of Aran" hadn't been
such a complete success, "Unfinished
Symphony" would have had to re-
main one of those pictures the League
could not afford to bring to Ann
Arbor."
Administration Approves
Grants For Local Projects
Appropriations of $9,646,656 for
Ann Arbor WPA projects have been
approved by the national adminis-
tration, the treasury department an-
nounced today. The state WPA will
choose from. 11 approved projects the
work to be undertaken at present with
the funds now available.
A University storage building for
which the WPA would contribute
more than half of the estimated cost
of $20.000 is on the approved list.
WALK FIRE BAREFOOTED
SUVA, Fiji, Oct. 28.-(P)-Fire-
walking, the famous ceremony of Jiji,
{ with barefoot natives walking across
burning coals, has puzzled medical
experts who witnessed an exhibition.

Scholarships
$1,000-A-Year Grants To
Be Awarded Seniors For
Graduate Work
A new type of fellowship grant-
ing a basic stipend of $1,000 plus
other allowances to first year grad-
uate students or the present senior
class in colleges and universities has
been announced by the Social Science
Research Council representing the
national social science organizations.
It is open to those who wish to
devote themselves to professional ca-
reers in economics, government, his-
tory, or other social sciences.
The basis of selection, it was ex-
plained, will be academic and per-
sonal records of the candidates, let-
ters from qualified instructors per-
taining to the candidate, and written
examinations offered through the
College Entrance Examination Board.
Examinations will be based on read-
ings in French and German, in ele-
mentary mathematics, and in social
science.
Fellows with superior records will
be reappointed so that they may be
aided throughout their entiremgrad-
uate training, it was stated by Rich-
ard H. Shryock, secretary of the
Council. One who has received this
fellowship may not choose the insti-
tution from which he received his
bachelor's degree for graduate study
but will be advised by the Council
in the selection of the institution best
suited for his work, Shryock ex-
plained.
Candidates wishing to apply for a
fellowship must include a letter from
the head of the department of his
major before applications will be
sent. All letters should be mailed to
the Fellowship Secretary, Social
Science Research Council, 230 Park
Ave., New York City. The closing
date for applications is March 15,
1936, so that the awards may be
available in July.
FIRE, POLICE BALL'
The annual ball of Ann Arbor's
firemen and policemen will be held
Nov. 7 in the Masonic Temple, a joint
committee announced Monday night.
MILLER
Drug Store
727 North University
Phone 9797
WE HAVE
BLUEBOOKS FOR ALL
SUBJECTS

Prof. Badger To Address
A.I.C.E. At 7:30 Tonight
Prof. W. L. Badger of the chemical
engineering department will address
the student branch of the American
Institute of Chemical Engineers at
7:30 p.m. tonight in Room 1042 East
Engineering Building.
Professor Badger's subject, "The
History of the Unit Operations," will
concern the methods of pumping,
distilling, and drying of medieval
times. Professor Badger has taken
the material for his address from his
own collection of manuscripts and
books on chemical engineering.

Purchase Of 'Ensian
ReceiptsRequested
All seniors are requested to pur-
chase receipts for Michiganensian
pictures as soon as possible, if they
wish to have their pictures in thel
1936 Michiganensian. These receipts J
may be purchased either from ac-
credited 'Ensian salesmen on campus,
or from any of the three official
photographers, Dey, Rentschler, or
Spedding.
Two dollars of the full purchase
price of $3 is for application on extra

orders of pictures for personal use
that may be ordered from the photo-
grapher, and is applicable at any
time during the year.
All pictures will be placed in the
yearbook this year in accordance with
the school of the graduating senior,
an innovation with the Michiganen-
sian.
APPLES VEGETABLES
SWEET CIDER
Open Evenings and Sundays
FARM MARKET
320 East Liberty Phone 9778

Month - Endi
Wednesday - Thursday

711

1 - __ _ _ _ __ i

Friday
2
e 9
Formeriy $15 to $19.75
- NOW -
$10.95 and $1.95
Silks and Wools
THE
RUB-LEY
SHOPPE
NICKELS ARCADE

DISTI NCTIVE'
You will find here Millinery
of the highest quality .
Smart, New Designs, exqui-
site in style.
HELEN POLHEMUS
61J East Williams Street

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Ancient, primitive man used his eyes
almost entirely out-of-doors, in the day-
Eycs were developed tor Now we use eyes for close time, under very high intensities of light
distance seeing seeing -intensities hundreds of times greater
than we find indoors today. When the sun went down, he went to sleep. And he used his
eyes for distant, not close seeing-hunting, fishing, looking at large objects. Even in Abra-
ham Lincoln's time very few people studied or sewed or read far into the night as we do.

THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
presents THE HONORABLE
ILLM RI.CASTLE
FORMER ACTING SECRETARY OF STATE
AND AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN
speaking on
"ur Relations with
Other Nations"
TOMORROW NIGHT at 8:15
at HILL AUDITORIUM

Eyes were developed for bright light

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1

Today we work under low brightness

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Modern civilization has completely changed all this. We have lightly tossed aside the fact
that our ey\es were in the process of developing for hundreds of thousands of years-develop-
ing fr distance seeing under tremendous quantities of natural daylight. In the last few
centur we.ve have taken liberties with all four of nature's principles-distance seeing, lots
of light to aid our eves, a relatively short day, and easy visual tasks. Instead, we have
substitu-ed close-seeing indoors, extremely low levels of lighting, a much .longer day,
4 t abnormally severe visual tasks.
The eye is a wonderful organ! But is it
any wonder that there are so many people
with defective eyes? Here are the latest
figures for damaged eyesight among
Nature's plan was a short day Man's day extends into the people of varying ages:
night

Grade school stud
College students. .
40 years........
60 years........

ents...................................20%
.........................................40%
................................. ......60%
.................................. .......95%

-v-a
'ZI
Primitive tass were easy on Today's tasks involve fine
the eyes details
2. THE EYES--A wonderfully exact

In the process of seeing there are three
factors:
1. THE VISUAL , TASK-We cannot
change our visual tasks. The act of
living imposes certain visual tasks and
our jobs require others.
science has been developed for correcting

eye defects with glasses. For defective eyes, there are no substitutes for the
services of the eyesight specialist.

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