100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 30, 1935 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1935

7 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGE FIVE

i .. i

Play Schedule
Announced By
Valentine Windt
Children's Theatre Plans
Three Productions For
Coming Year
Miss Frink To Assist
To Present 'Aladdin And
His Wonderful Lamp'
Dec. 6 And 7
The three plays to be offered this
year by the Children's Theatre have
been announced by Lois King, '37,
chairman of the Children's Theatre.
The first play to be offered will be
"Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp"
to be presented Dec. 6 and 7. March
6 and 7 one of the stories concerning
the life of Robin Hood will be given
and in the week of May 3 the group
will produce "Alice In Wonderland."
Windt To Direct
Valentine B. Windt, director of
Play Production, will direct the plays
and will be assisted by Virginia Frink,
'34, who was prominent in Play Pro-
duction for the last two years and
during this summer session helped di-
rect "Sister Gracia" produced by the
Michigan Repertory Players.
The committee in charge of select-
ing the plays to be offered include
Miss King, chairman, Miss Ethel Mc-
Cormick, Miss Frink, Mr. Windt,
Theresa Swab who has been appoint-
ed box office chairman for the Chil-
dren's Theatre,and representatives
from the public schools of the city.
Public Schools Represented
The representatives from the public
schools include: Miss Eva Sherman,
Donevan; Mrs. Frank Reed, Ann Ar-
bor High; Miss Sarita Davis, Uni-
versity Elementary; Miss Catherine
Cudip, University High; Miss Hazel
Rich, Mack; Miss Margaret Harring-
ton, Perry; and Mrs. W. Rea, Angell.
Representatives for Bach, Eberbach
and Tappan Schools have not been
announced but will be included in
the committee later.
The Children's Theatre offers an
opportunity for children of the pub-
lic schools to perform before an au-
dience. It is also an opportunity for
students of the University to gain ex-
perience in acting the mature parts
of the plays offered and obtaining
practice in work back stage and in
the costume and make-up depart-
ments.
800 Are Expected
At Club Reception
Eight hundred women, both old and
new members, are expected at the
Faculty Women's Club reception, to
be held at 3 p.m. today in the League
Ballroom. This affair annually opens
the program of the year.
In charge are Mrs. E. L. Acams, the
president, who will receive, assisted
by Regent Esther M. Cram, Mrs. Alex-
ander Ruthven, Mrs. Junius Beal,
Mrs. Shirley Smith, Mrs. James Bruce
and Mrs. Clarence Yoakum; Mrs. Earl
Wolaver, chairman of the program
committee; Mrs. Walter Hunt, chair-
man of the refreshment committee
and Mrs. Hugh Keeler, chairman of
the hospitality committee.
Deans and wives of Deans will act
as hostesses in small informal groups,
while past presidents are among
those who will pour. Many other.
members will assist throughout the
room.

Large Hat Is Chic

Ruthvens Receive At Reception
For Faculty In Union Ballroom

/
---'

p

This large velvet hat is smart for
tea dances and other dressy after-
noon affairs.
Sepeshy Criticizes
Eilshemius' Work
In First Exhibition
By LOUISE MARS
Discussing the work of Louis Mich-
el Eilshemius in the first exhibition
of the Ann Arbor Art Association
of the year held in the Alumni Me-
morial Hall, Zolton Sepeshy of the
Cranbrook Academy of Art recently
declared the artist a charming minor
painter. Mr. Eilshemius has been
called typically American, a master
of the medium and a truly great
artist, but Mr. Sepeshy declared that
he could see no call for these titles.
The critic said that the painter's
fault lies in a poor sense of color
value, showing a lack of substance
and structure.
"A painter must discover some-
thing, and Louis Michel Eilshemius
has failed to do this," the speaker
continued. Even in comparison with
contemporary artists, as well as the
great master, Mr. Eilshemius is un-
favorable.
The gallery talk by Zolton Sepeshy
marked the final day of this por-
tion of the exhibition. The next
display will be from the collection of
J. B. Neuman and will be on exhibit
Nov. 4 at Alumni Memorial Hall.
Donaldson To Deliver
Cultural Lecture Today
Prof. Bruce M. Donaldson,
chairman of the division of fine
arts, will deliver the fifth in the
series of Orientation lectures at
5 p.m. today in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater. This lecture
will be the second in the series of
cultural addresses, presenting op-
portunities, both curricular and
extra-curricular, in the fields of
music, art and drama.
Student orientation advisers are
reminded that their criticisms of
the orientation period are due
before the lecture today in Miss
Ethel McCormick's office.
AN EXCLUSIVE FEATURE!
We now have at your disposal
250 DIFFERENT
TI NTS
For Your Shoes
Let us show you our many
colors among which we can
guarantee you'll find the de-
sired shade. We can strip
some shoes.
One-day service, if necessary
We call for and deliver
COLLEGE
SHOE REPAIR SHOP
426 Thompson 6898

One of the largest Senate recep-
tions to date was witnessed last night
in the ballroom of the Union, when
President and Mrs. Alexander G.
Ruthven and the University Senate
received the new members of the
faculty and their wives. Mrs. Ruth-
ven looked particularly lovely in white
lace, with a large bouquet of orchids
at her throat.
Among those who poured were Mrs.
Junius E. Beal, in black velvet, Mrs.
M. Bates, outstanding in black with
a touch of pink at the neckline, Mrs.
W. W. Bishop, in the popular shade
of dubonnet cut velvet, and Mrs.
Edward H. Kraus, lovely in ivory velet
with a pale net shawl around her
shoulders. Mrs. Herbert C. Sadler
looked extremely distinguished in a
hand-knitted evening dress of black.
Mrs. C. S. Yoakum was there in
peach colored crepe with a touch of
beading around the neckline in the
back. Mrs. Emil Lorch chose blue
crepe for her ensemble, and Mrs. Earl
V. Moore was in white crepe and lace
with a large red flower at the waist-
line in back. Dean Alice Lloyd also
served in this capacity and looked
particularly stunning in printed sat-
in. Green, yellow and white were the
predominating colors, and around her.
neck she wore a long string of crystal
beads. Arriving with Miss Lloyd was
Miss Jeanette Perry, wearing an eve-,
ning gown of purple crepe.

Mrs. Frederick P. Jordan, former
Dean of Women, was seen in black
lace, while Mrs. Preston W. Slosson
also chose black for her becoming
dress. Both Mrs. Walter F. Hunt
and Mrs. Joseph A. Bursley chose
printed satin, Mrs. Hunt's boasting a
detachable cape of the same material
and lined in pink, while Mrs. Bursley's
gown was set off by a long full train.
Miss Ethel A. MacCormick, social di-
rector of the League, was there in
pink lace, and Mrs. Henry C. Adams
looked lovely in black velvet. Mrs.
Everett S. Brown, assisting her hus-
band in duties as chairman of the re-
ception, was charming in silver lame,
with a cluster of gardenias in her
hair. Mrs. Jean Hebrard, who has
just returned from Paris, chose a
dress of black net, and Mrs. Mehmet
Aga-Oglu chose white and gold lame.
The tea tables were beautifully dec-
orated with chrysanthemums in
shades of rose, pink, and white, and
each table bearing four tall tapers.
Professor Ross Bittenger of the ar-
chitectural school was in charge of
the decorations.
During the reception from 8:30 un-
til 10:00 p.m. music was furnished by
a trio from the music school, consist-
ing of Miss Ruby Pinert, cellist, Mr.
Romine Hamilton, violinist, and Mr.
Jack Conklin, pianist. Following this
Bob Steinle's orchestra played for
dancing until 12:00 p.m.

French Club
Elect Officers
For This Year
At the last meeting of the Cercle
Francais, Oct. 17, the following were
elected to office: Mary Morgan, '36,
president, Janet McPhee, '36, vice-
president, Katherine Hal". '36, secre-
tary and Dorothy Berman, '36, treas-
urer.
Miss Morgan recently returned
from a trip abroad, where she re-
ceived, with honorable mention, a
certificate in French from the Alli-
ance Francaise, Paris.
After the election, Mr. Charles E.
Koella, faculty adviser for the group,
addressed the organization on the
subject of the relative positions of
France and Ethiopia in the European
crisis.
Following his talk Prof. Rene Tala-
mon delivered a brief resume of his
trip to France this past summer.
Anyone interested in trying out for
the organization may secure an in-
terview with Professor Talamon at
the Romance Language Building.
Dues are one dollar annually.
SMARTEST
HOSIERY SHOPPE
300 South State Street
Sheer - Ringless - New Wonderfoot
wear DEXDALE Hosiery 69c - $1,00

Swimming Club To Hold
Tea For New Students
Tea will be served for all women
interested in swimming at 4:15 p.m.
today at the W.A.A. building, it was
announced by Mary Montgomery, '37.
Miss Montgomery is president of
the Swimming Club. Any women
who would be interested in joining
the club or in using University swim-
ming facilities during the school year
are cordially invited to attend.
ALPHA OMICRON
Alpha OmicronhPi held an exchange
dinner last night with Zeta Tan
Alpha sorority.

CHILDREN'S THEATER
All those intereste in trying out
for parts in the plays to be offered
by the Children's Theatre this year
are to attend the tryouts from 4 to 6
p.m. tomorrow in the Garden Room
of the League, prepared to recite ten
lines of prose or poetry from memory,
according to Valentine B. Windt, di-
rector.
PALLiR2
TATE JPRET
- WE W EILER
WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIRING

Typewriters
Rented .6

Small Monthly Payments

NEW Portables of any make or model. RECONDITIONED
typewriters of all makes. Special Rates to Students. Ask about
our rental purchase plan. Buy where you can see all makes in
a complete range of prices.
D. MORRILL
314 South State Street
Distributor: L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriters, Inc.
Dealer: All makes of new portables and used typewriters.
Since 1908 Phone 6615

'fl1

I

For Yourself and Your Friends
Satin Dashe
Slips . . . . . $2.95
You'll soon pay $5.00
For These!
Gowns . . . . $5.95
You'll soon pay $7.00
For These!
11
r4 ,
w 4
-4,
l2
I '-V.. Y
k

"FASHION)
ACCE4

AB-LE
SSORI ES

r

VAN RAALTE
PAN TIES
GLOVE SILK and LISLE
59c to $1.95

Flowers
from Tailored Bontineer
to "Dressy Lame"

Jewelry
Barbaric Touch, Clips,
Bracelets
Rhinestones, Natural Gold,
Silver Settings
SPORT AND DRESSY TYPES

Dance Sets
in PURE DYE SILK
Handmade, Tailored
And Lace Trims
$1.95 to 395

-

"
1

Gloves
- FABRICS -
$1.00 to 1.95
FRENCH KID and PIGSKIN
$1.95 to 5.95

NECK WEAR
Pique, Satin Lace,
Sequin Gorgette,

1

Velvet
59c
Others
$1.00 to $3.95

, }
y~l 1

A LT1Z !Creai on

WA-

I

Dress Up MICHIGAN
Ds Up *BEAT PENN!
METALS ARE
GOIG PLACES
$1 9 to $2250
MATCH the gleam in
your eye with a metal
crepe formal. The fabrics
in themselves are en-
chanting, and the stylesE
do wonders for your fig-
ure. In white, black and
heavenly shades of blue,
red, and green. 12 to 20.

Have you ever thought o
buying Stockings
tot
FIT yourLEG?
* If you haven't-you should im- ter runs or twisted seams in stock-

1Hostess Gowns
and Pajamas

U , _ _ __ _ _ _

6

I

Others from
5.95 to 12.95
IN VELVET, with a glow
that sets off jewel tones,
Satin and Velvet combi-
nations; ruby, sapphire
nr Pm'r'A nDe cphPr_

® beautiful as ex-
pensive importsh

t trimmed with rich
French laces
" washes without loss of lustre
® wears for many, kmany months
. won't pull away from the
.- -.--1

mediately investigate the sheer
economy of Belle-Sharmeer Stock-
ings. They're made of unusually
high quality silk, twisted many
times to give you extra service and
extra beauty. But the chief reason
for their exceptional wear is their
exceptional fit. Less danger of gar-

ings made to fit your leg in width
as well as length and, of course, in
foot size!
Individual leg sizes for shorts,
mediums, tails, plumps. And all
exclusive here.
$100 $135 and up,
.L the pair

I 1

I

M 1 iV U ULIL.X

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan