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October 30, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO"

THT9 MMIT!XN DIILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1939

Twa WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 30, 193~

British Airman
To Deliver Two
Speeches Here
Featured By Theosophical
Societies; Student Club
Elects Officers
Capt. Sidney Ransom, noted Brit-
ish theosophist, will deliver two ad-.
dresses here Friday in Natural Science
Auditorium under the auspices of the
Ann Arbor Theosophical Society and
the Student Theosophical Club.
The first lecture, "The Great Or-
derly Plan," will be given at 4:15 p.m.,
and the second, "Theosophy, the
Science of Life," at 8 p.m.
According to Dr. Beunaventure
Jimenez of the Medical School, presi-
dent of the society, the general pub-
lic is welcome.
Captain Ransom, who served in the
Royal Air Forces during the World
War, has been connected with the
International Theosophical Society
for many years, Dr. Jiminez said. He
has been an engineer in South Af-
rica and a Liberal member of Parlia-
ment as well as an editor for many
years.
The lectures are being sponsored in
part by the Student Theosophical
Club which recently reorganized,
electing W. Allen Fisher, '37, as its
president. Other officers are Judith
Jimenez, '36, vice president; John
Lisher, '39, secretary; and Liliane O.
del Valle, '37, treasurer.
The club has announced as its ob-
jectives: "To foster brotherhood with-
out distinction of race, creed, sex,
caste or color; to encourage the
study of comparative religion, philo-
sophy and science; and to bring in-
ternational speakers to promote these
two objectives."

Wonder If They've Heard About Dewey At Manila?

-Associated Press Photo.
The depression was just a rumor so far as it concerned Big Prairie, O. Only two families are without
automobiles and every available adult has a job. The main street of the town of 200 is shown as it appeared on
a Saturday afternoon.

Vincent To Address'
Engineers Tonight
The second meeting of the year of
the mechanical division of the stu-
dent branch of the American Society
of Mechanical Engineers will be held
at 7:30 tonight in the Union.
E. T. Vincent, chief engineer of the
Diesel engine division of the Contin-
ental Corp., will be the principal
speaker. Mr. Vincent's talk, illustrat-
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
WANTED
WANTED: Graduate couple who
would like warm housekeeping
apartment in private home near
East U. and Greenwood Ave. $20
month to right party, including,
heat, light, gas and phone. Ad-
dress, P. O. Box, 123. 91
NOTICES
TEACHER of popular and classical
piano music. Helen Louise Barnes.
Call 8469. 2x
LOST AND FOUND
OXFORD GREY SUIT COAT in
Union recreation room, Saturday
afternoon. Call Roldel, 6738. 90
FOUND: If you miss a bathtub, look
in the back yard of the Student
Publications Building. This is a
large, four-legged affair. 89
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasornable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Suite with private bath
and shower for three or four.
Sunny rooms, steam heat, phone
8544. 422 East Washington.
88
SOMEONE wanted to live during
winter in summer home on Whit-
more Lake. Completely furnished
and all modern. Rent reasonable.
Phone during the day. 4323. 84
PARTY WITH BUICK car wants
driver to Florida. Phone 3591. 76

KING'S TAVERN ALE
ON DRAUGHTI

I

at
THE OLD GERMAN RESTAURANT
HAAB BROTHERS 120 W. Washington St., 1 Block West of Main

U

- - - - - - - - - -

OV

~E

DOWNTOWN - Next to Wuerth Theatre
The Foremost Clothiers in Washtenaw County

ed by motion pictures, will be on the be held at 6:15 p.m. Students of me-
Diesel motors. The differences in de- chanical and aeronautical engineer-
sign and construction between gas ing and members of the faculty are
and Diesel engines will be reviewed. invited to attend both the dinner and
A dinner preceding the meeting will I the technical sessi6n.

Noon Whistle Just One Detail
Of University Fire Equipment

Corn Husking
Champs Await
National Mee

JI

Nine Corn Belt Sta
To Send Thousa
Bangboard Battl

ates Are
nds For
e

ATTICA, Ind., Oct. 29.---(P) -
America's ace corn huskers, starting
at the firing of a pistol and shucking
at high speed for 80 minutes, will
compete for the national champion-
ship here in Fountain County, In-
diana, November 8.
Preparations are being made to
take care of many thousands of corn
husking fans who will watch com-
petitors from nine corn belt states.
Thirty-five churches in the county
will help feed the crowd. National
guardsmen, state police and county
officers, will supervise parking and
traffic, while 330 farmers have been
deputized to keep spectators the prop-
er distance from the huskers.
Six rows are allotted each contest-
ant who is penalized three pounds of
corn from his load for every pound
he leaves in the field. Wagons with
rubber tires, equipped with bang-
boards of the same weight, are sup-
plied each entrant. Farm periodicals
of the midwest sponsor the contest.
Men from South Dakota, Minne-
sota, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Mis-
souri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio will
come to this county on the banks of
the Wabash to take part.
Carl Seiler of Oneida, Ill., holds the.
world's corn husking record. In 1932
at Galva, Ill., he husked 36.9 bushels
in 80 minutes. Last year Ted Balke
of Redwood County, Minnesota, won
the national championship.
The winner of first place, gets a
prize of $100. Second and third place
men also receive prizes.
LOOK OUT, FUNNY MEN
A warning of severe punishment to
destructive Hallowe'en pranksters
was issued by Chief of Police Lewis
W. Fohey yesterday. Scout cars will
be on duty to curb the destructive
activities which have already begun
and to watch for future offenders, he
declared.
SPECIAL SHOWING!I
ART CINEMA LEAGUE
presents
"UNFINISHED
SYMPHONY"
Featuring
FRANZ SHUBERT'S
[MMORTAL MELODIES
INTERPRETED BY
Vienna Boys' Choir
vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Gyula Horwath's Gypsy Band
Martha Eggerth European
Operatic Star
Lydia MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
Friday and Saturday
November 1-2 at 8:00
Tickets 35c--A/ll seats reserved
Also- TWO SHORT SUBJECTS

At exactly 12 noon on Saturday
nearly the whole town of Ann Arbor
echoes and re-echoes from the
whistle blasts of the University power
plant.
The immediate significance of
these blasts is the official closing of
the University for the week. A deeper
significance, however, can be traced
to the fact that the power plant's
huge whistle is the front-line trench
in the University's war against fire,
and its weekly blasts are periodical
reassurances to students and faculty
members that every effort is being
made to reduce fire hazards in the
University buildings.
Elaborate precautions, with the gi-
gantic whistle as an integral part,
have been developed in the event of
a fire breaking out somewhere on the
University's property. A test tube
spills in a laboratory of the chemical
engineering department, inflam-
mable material ignites, and the room
is soon filled with smoke and crack-
ling flames. The laboratory assistant
rushes to the phone and informs the
operator at the University exchange
of what has happened.
The operator immediately pushes
two buttons on the switchboard, and
then proceeds to call the city fire
department. One of the buttons
starts an emergency pump in the
basement of the West Engineering
Building, which is capable of build-
ing up in short order more than 150
pounds of pressure for the 50 hy-
drants scattered around the campus.
The other button connects with
the power plant and sets off the
whistle. If the fire is located east
of campus, four short blasts, sound-
ed close together, will be heard
throughout the city. If the fire had
started north of the campus, one
blast would be sounded, and corre-
sponding signals have been arranged
for other points on or near the cam-
pus.
These blasts, while sounding a gen-
eral alarm, also have the specific
purpose of calling out all the fore-
men of the various divisions of the
Buildings and Grounds Departments.
These men round up their assistants
and rush to the scene of the fire.
Having arrived, the men find an
exhaustive array of equipment which
can be used to put out the fire. The
University possesses three reels of
fire hose, each 600 feet long, located
in strategic places on campus. There
are 800 two and one half-gallon
fire extinguishers for putting out
general fires, and over 400 special-
ized extinguishers for checking chem-
ical, electrical, and oil fires.
Edward C. Pardon, superintendent
Football Is Lauded
In Yost Radio Talk
Fielding H. Yost, director of ath-
letics, was interviewed on the ques-
tion of athletics, by Prof. Waldo Ab-
bot of the English department yes-
terday in the third of the "Michigan,
My Michigan" series over Station
WJR from Morris Hall.
The interview consisted of a group
of questions pertaining to the de-
velopment and the benefit of sports
in the University and in the state
and to Michigan's record in Big Ten
football and other sports.
Asked what sport he considered
best in developing youth, Coach Yost
replied that "as a game for those
who like it I cannot see anything
better than football."
To the question of whether he
thought the "old Michigan spirit"
was dead, Yost replied that "if you
think the Michigan spirit is dead or
dormant, by all means attend the pep
meeting next Friday night."

of the Buildings and Grounds De-
partment, directs all the Univer-
sity's fire-fighting equipment. As-
sisting him are Irving W. Truettner,
inspector, and Walter M. Roth, en-
gineer of the department.
Two major factors are attributed
by Mr. Truettner as underlying the
efficiency of the University's fire pre-
vention facilities. One is the "no
smoking" ordinance, which has al-
ways been rigidly enforced. The
other is the constant inspection of
the University buildings. Several
trips nightly are made by the night
watchmen, and once a year Mr.
Treuttner conducts a special search
of the buildings to discover and
eliminate possible fire hazards.
The last serious fire, Mr. Truett-
ner reported, occurred more than 11
years ago, when a unit of Univer-
sity Hospital burned down. Since
then only minor outbreaks, such as
the fire in one of the heating tunnels
in September of this year, have oc-
curred, and these have been checked
before such damage had been caused,
Mr. Truettner stated.
Accident Kills
Man And Hurts
Three Others
Tragedy Befalls Woman
Who Has Suffered From
Many Traffic Accidents
The spectre of death in traffic ac-
cidents, which has followed her for
20 years, yesterday left Mrs. Minnie
Dietz, 55, and her mother, Mrs. Louise
Letts, 80, both of 1012 Michigan Ave.,
in the Plymouth Sanitarium suffer-
ing from serious injuries following an
automobile collision in which one
man died and two others were in-
jured on Plymouth Road Monday.
Stephen G. Tarpley, 36, Detroit,
whose car collided with Mrs. Dietz',
died instantly and Jesse Booker, 40,
Plymouth, and Evelyn Prance, 26, De-
troit, are in University Hospital with
severe external injuries.
Mrs. Dietz' first husband, Fred
Brown, died in 1915 when his car
crashed through a bridge railing at
Whitmore Lake. Her second hus-
band, Oswald Dietz, was killed when
struck by an automobile on an Ann
Arbor street in 1928.
Only last Sunday Mrs. Dietz, while
driving slowly in Detroit, struck a
13-year-old boy, police said, but did
not severely injure him. It was after
routine questioning about this inci-
dent that Mrs. Dietz was struck by
Tarpley's automobile.

Uncle Sam Is
Biggest Advice
Giver In World
Thousands Of Pamphlets
Offered; Printing Office
Largest On Earth
WASHINGTON, Oct. 29. - OPf) -
Uncle Sam is the biggest advice-
giver in the world, donating and sell-
ing to his citizens in a year some
60,000,000 publications offering guid-
ance on 65,000 topics.
These publications - pamphlets,
leaflets, booklets, books - cover al-
most every conceivable factual sub-
ject, there being 65,000 kinds of them.
The government printing office at its
latest inventory had on hand for sale
more than 3,500,000 copies and held
an additional 15,000,000 for the vari-
ous government departments, to be
mailed out from time to time at their
instructions. The office takes in
about $650,000 a year in gross sales
and the pamphlets it sends out, at
fees of 5 cents or up, are only about
one-fifth of the number sent out
through the departments.
The procedure generally is this: If
a citizen wants information on an
agricultural subject he can get it -
frequently free - from the depart-
ment of agriculture, or he may write
direct to the printing office and re-
ceive it for a small charge. Many
requests for publications are cleared
through members of Congress.
Officials of the printing office say
that not only are its operations the
biggest by far on earth, but that its
government library is perhaps the
most comprehensive ever assembled.
Now, 665,760 different publications
are at hand - extendingsback to the
time the government was founded -
and to these are being added an av-
erage of 37,000 new publications year-
ly.
Agriculture, which distributed 17,-
671,000 publications in the fiscal year
recently ended, heads the depart-
mental parade in giving out printed
information. Its list of publications
includes some 14,000, although most
of these are not in the 'popular' class,
and it requires a 113-page volume,
printed in small type, merely to cata-
log the available issues.

c
SSA 5AJ\ J'.
yf}

at'o£~ J2sic

FOR SALE
TANDEM bicycle in good condition
for only $20. 617 Ashley. 83
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
Wa 4tches
THE TIME SHOP
1121 S. University Ave.
Today & Thursday
SYLV I A SIDNEY
HERBERT MARSHALL
"ACCENT ON YOUTH"
plus
Richard Barthel mess
"FOUR HOURS TO KILL"
Ii, .1d

.1
2",

Peace of mind in knowing that your evening
attire is unassailably correct, adds much to
the suavity of your appearance. Whether
you are wearing tails or tuxedo - turn to
Arrow for the dress shirt, collar, hand-
kerchief and tie, and be assured of quality
haberdashery in the latest style,

-c=4taw

s4;tI

a'Ut'

Gea

L-

-m

MICH IGAN

25c MATINEES
and Balcony Nights

Leaves Tonight
withBRIAN AH E R N E
FRANK MORGAN ALINE MacMAHON
TOMORROW
ENTIRE STAGE AND SCREEN SHOW PLAYS 3 DAYS
Matinee and Night, Thursday, Friday, Saturday

I

-}!'
:

Better Course
in
BALLROOM
DANCING
4 Reasons Why:

1. Strictly Private
2. Teaches the latest dances

HOME MADE
In div idual
CH ICK E N
PIES
With Salad . . . 25c
OPEN 7 A.M. to 8:30P.M.
Pancakes
Always On Order.,
unt Het's
513 East William

ON STAGE
HARRY RESEN
and His
CLIQUOT CLUB
ESKIMOES
17 Entertainers

ON SCREEN
Edward E. Horton
in
"HIS NIGHT OUT"
Matinees 25c
Nights: Balc. 30c, M. Floor 40c

3.
4.

Lessons at your convenience
No onlookers; no embarass-
ment.

!IllI

"new
- --------- --

Terrace Garden Studio
Wuerth Theater Bldg Phone 9695

SCHLENKER SPECIALS
Clothes Hampers .........$1.25 7-gal. Garbage Can .........85c
10-lb hydrated lime for lawns 15c 10-gal. Garbage Can ........95c
4 -gal. Garbage Can......T.75c 12-gal. Garbage Can ......$1.20
SCHLENKER HARDWARE COMPANY
213-215 West Liberty Street Phone 8575

,_ ._ __I

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'"" = :

Last Day
PETER B. KYNE'S
"Cappy Ricks Returns"
and
JEAN ARTHUR
"PUBLIC MENACE"
DAILY 1:30-11 P.M.
15c to 6 - 25c After 6
WH IT NEY
Starting Thursday -
First Ann Arbor Showing!
NORMAN FOSTER
AAAD\/ fADI ICI F

'16

MAJESTIC
NOW SHOWING - D
"Order in the Court
b HERE COMES THE JUDGE!"
Adolph Zukor presents
"THE VIRS0INIA
with STEPIN FETCHIT
MARSHA HUNT-JOHNNY DOWNS
ROBERT CUMMINGS APqramountPicture

Matinee and Balc. Eyes. 25c
Main Floor Eves. 35c
OUBLE FEATURE
UD'SI
7-A'

call
9
0i

I , , ,

the beer vault
221 west huron

~-.---- -

1111

and ZASU PITTS

_ - -

1 I 1

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in

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