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October 25, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1939,

Leaves California

Indian
Serious

-Associated Press Photo.
In a letter to a Hollywood publi-
cation, William Randolph Hearst,
newspaper publisher announced he
was forsaking his California resi-
dence because of high taxes. He
t said he feared many others would
leave for the same reason.
Safety Devices
To Feature Cars
For '36 Models
November Auto Show At
Detroit Will Exhibit New
' uper-Safe' Vehicles
How automobile manufactures are
doing their share in the current cam-
paign to reduce traffic fatalities by
making modern cars literally "super-
safe" will be demonstrated by many
new safety devices at.the coming De-
troit Auto Show. The exposition op-
ens November 9 at Convention Hall
for an eight day run.
The new 1936 models are guarded
against accidents by a legion of safe-
ty devices ranging from improved,
stronger breaking systems to bodies
ta practically encase the passeng-
ers in four armored walls.
One manufacturer has gone so far
as to equip his cars withstwo separate
and complete braking systems. One
is the hydraulic type used as the
regular means of stopping, and there
is also a complete mechanical stop-
ping system.
Shatter-proof glass, in one type or
another, has been adopted as stand-
ard equipment by many manufactur-
ers on their new lines. Strengthened
frames and bodies predominate in the
new 1936 cars, and headlights in
many instances now switch the glare
to oncoming cars over to the right
side of the road.
Special attractions for the coming
automobile exposition include Nick
Lucas and his orchestra, a fashion
show for women, and puppet shows
and plays for children.
Application For
Rhodes Awards
Required Soon
About a dozen applications have
already been received for the Rhodes
Scholarship competition. The closing
date for arranging appointments and
filing petitions is Monday, Oct. 28.
The applicants will be interviewed
by the University Committee for
Rhodes Scholarships the following
day, and not more than five will be
selected to appear before a subsequent
meeting of a state board, to be held
Dec. 12 or 14 in Ann Arbor.
From the representatives from the
University and other colleges in the
State, the state board will choose two
students to represent Michigan in a
final elimination before a district
commission on Dec. 16 in Chicago.
Prof. Arthur L. Cross of the history
department is the chairman of the
University Committee and is in charge
of all applications.
The scholarship, which provides for
a year's attendance at Oxford, is open
to any unmarried student between the
ages of 19 and 25, with at least junior
standing in any college or university
in the country.
Four students are annually selected
for the scholarship from each of
eight districts in the nation, each
district including six states.

Willey Claims
Theory Untrue
In Monograph
Declares No Connection
Exists Between Aztec,
German Languages
In a recent scientific monograph,
Prof. Norman Willey, of the German
department, attacked the philological
theory which claimed the existence of
a valid relationship between the
languages of Indo-Germanic and
Nahuatl (the language of the Aztecs).
According to Professor Willey, the
ultimate consequences of such a
theory would have moved far beyond
the limited field of philology in their
importance. He pointed out that a
fairly conclusive proof would have
been established that a continental
"land bridge" once spanned the At-
lantic, forming a strip of dry land all
the way from Europe to America. Al-
so, for purposes of compatibility, we
would have had to believe that a
large part of the prehistoric popula-
tion of America were rather the an-
cestors of the modern European type
than of the Asiatic type, stated Pro-
fessor Willey. Thus, he said, our ideas
concerning the history of man and
of the earth would have had to be
revised in a manner consistent with
the claims of this new concept.
Needs Evolution
He remarked that a theory of such
vital significance needed accurate
evaluation as to its validity, for oth-
erwise, the possibility existed that
inexperienced and impressionistic
scientists, attracted by the startling
novelty and romanticism of the idea,
would 'absorb the theory as axiomatic.
As a result, he stated, at least a
whole generation of development in
the fields of geology, ethnology, and
philology would necessarily be col-
ored by the fallacies arisingyfrom this
theory, before its bad effects could be
lived down.
Professor Willey, having recognized
this danger, worked on an analysis of
every sample of relationship upon
which the theory rested. The au-
thentic relationships which remained
were few enough to be regarded as
coincidences. He pointed out a large
number of cases in which relation-
ships had been formed because of an
obvious ignorance of the phonetic
value of certain letter combinations
in Nahuatl.
Comments On Theory
Professor Willey has this to say for
the theory: "We canont say what
may have come to America from the
West before the dawn of history;
some obliging geologist is usually
ready to supply continental bridges
and conveniently appearing islands
for the assistance of Atlantis theor-
ists and Easter Island ethnologists.
Evidently, however, philologists have
been content to dismiss the book on
account of the inherent improbabili-
ty of its thesis, and that no one has
examined from the Mexican angle is
probably due to the fact that Mr.
Denison (the sponsor of the theory)
himself states, 'Any comparative phil-
ologist may decide in an hour's time
as to the value of the work and it is
not necessary to understand Mexi-
can.'
Coupon Method
Of Tax Payment
Is Held Illegal
LANSING, Oct. 24.- (P) -An opin-
ion from the attorney general's office
blocked today a proposal that Mich-

igan shoppers pay their 3 per centj
sales tax with coupons.
Assistant Attorney General Arthur
T. Iverson, in an opinion written
at the request of the state board
of tax administration, declared "it
would not be within the province of
your board to initiate the use of tok-
ens, stamps, or other prepaid re-
ceipts."
Iverson held that the sales tax is
a retailer's privilege tax, and that
to sell coupons in advance to shoppers
would be to impose the tax on the
customer. In states where tokens are
used to pay the tax, he pointed out,
the state laws expressly provide for
the custom.
Another legal question arose to
puzzle the board today. Automobile
dealers met with board members to
argue that a portion of the sales tax
collected on cars sold and then re-
possessed by finance companies
should be rebated by the state. They
also contended that the sales tax
should not be collected on cars re-
sold.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance Ile per reading line.
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or more
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephionerate -15c perreading line
for two or more insertions.
10', discount if paid within ten days
Minimum three lines per insertion.
from the date of last insertion.
By contract, per line - 2 lines daily, one
month...................S.c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months........8c
2 lines daily, college year.......7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 nmonths.........8c
100 lines used as desired.........9c
300 lines used as desired.........8c
1,000 lines used as desired........7c
2,000 lines used as desired....... Se
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
Sc persline to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add 106
per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Black leather notebook con-
taining money and credit notes.
Very valuable to owner. Reward.
John Park, 7217.
LOST: Black zipper leather notebook
at Daily Business office. Contain-
ing complete notes of owner, very
valuable. Liberal reward. Willis
Tomlinson. 426 N. Ingalls.
LOST: Black wallet containing $11
at physics lecture room 10 o'clock,
Oct. 24. Money needed very much.
Phone 4809. 616 South Division.
74

Italian Native Troops March Toward Aduwa

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

-Associated Press Photo.
Native troops, commanded by General Pirzio Birole, are shown as
they drove toward Aduwa, Ethiopia, just before the town was captured
by the Italian army.
Prof. Fries Edits Dictionary
Describing E glish Language

By ROBERT WEEKS
On the fifth floor of Angell Hall, in
hushed rooms permeated with an
erduite atmosphere a scholarly period
dictionary is being edited. It is the
Early Modern English Dictionary and
is an attempt to describe the English
language used from 1475 to 1700.
Within this time are the literary
products of Shakespeare, Jonson,
Spenser, and Milton. The English
Reformation, which separated the
English church from that of Rome
and brought about the English Bible,
was consummated in these two cen-
turies. Interest in the Latin and
Greek classics also quickened the in-
tellectual pulse of England at this
time as did the new cosmic concep-
tions revealed by the Copernican Sys-
tem. This period also includes the
voyages of discovery and their multi-
farious revelations.
Fries Is Editor
Prof. Charles C. Fries of the Eng-
lish department, who is the editor
of the Dictionary, said regarding the
years between 1475 and 1700, "On the
whole, the period covered by the Early
Modern English Dictionary was one
in which the English thought and
imagination were assimilating many
elements of an entirely new culture
and by no other means can this as-
similating be so well traced as by a
thorough description of the new words
and meanings that accounted for the
remarkable expansion of the English
vocabulary of that time." This ex-
pansion resulted in an increase in the
size of the English vocabulary of 300
per cent within these 200 years, he
stated.
At the present time the words are
being studied and edited, a task that
requires the constant work of a staff
of fourteen besides the assistance pro-
vided by seventeen NYA workers. This
material is contained on slips, each
of which gives a citation telling the
manner and occasion on which the
word was emploved.
Begun In 1858
The contributions for the Early
Modern English Dictionary have come
from various sources. First of all,
there was the material inherited from
the Oxford Dictionary and generous-
ly contributed by Oxford University
and the Oxford University Press. This
dictionary was begun in 1858 and
was not completed until 1928, during
which time citations obtained by
readers from books and pamphlets
published during the 16th and 17th
centuries, amounted to nearly two
.and one half million in number.
There was next the collection of
slips called the "Supplement" of the
Oxford Dictionary. These citations
were those that reached the editors
of the Oxford Dictionary after the
part of the Dictionary containing the
words with which they were concerned
had been released. This consists of
50,000 slips.
Another collection of citations was
received which had been part of an
intended historical dictionary of agri-
culture terms to supplement the Ox-
ford Dictionary in this particular
field. This collection amounts in all
to 40,000 slips.
A reading program was also insti-

Classified Dfrectory

tuted which was based on a biblio-
graphical survey of the materials pre-
served in print produced from 1475
to 1700. Manuscrips were also used
whenthey seemed towoffer sources
for additional evidence. Volunteer
readers (nearly 450 in all and repre-
senting more than 200 separate col-
leges and universities in this coun-
try) have done most of this reading
but members of the staff have also
covered considerable material besides
checking for accuracy, evaluating, and
sometimes supplementing the work of
the volunteer readers.
From Many Sources
From these various sources, there
are in the collections of the Early
Modern English Dictionary more than
four and a half million slips contain-
ing citations of the 100,000 words that
make up the vocabulary of early mod-
ern English. These slips are filed in
vaults in a fire proof room on the
fifth floor of Angell Hall.
Professor Fries went to England
this summer in order to arrange for
the printing of the first section at the
Oxford University Press. The Dic-
tionary, which was begun in 1929
and is being supported by the Rocke-
feller Foundation, will be sent to Eng-
land for printing section by section
and, according to Professor Fries, the
first volume will be completely in
press within the next year.
In this fashion the work will be con-
tinued until all the volumes have been
printed, resulting in the only Early
Modern English dictionary ever writ-
ten on a large scale.
TO HOLD SERVICES
Funeral services will be held at 9
a.m. tomorrow in St. Thomas Cath-
olic Church for Charles Carroll, vet-
eran Ann Arbor fireman, who died
suddenly at the fire station Wednes-
day morning.

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
NOTICES
TEACHER of popular and classical
piano music. Helen Louise Barnes.
Call 8469. 2x
POSITIONS WANTED
CHEF WANTS job in fraternity
house, can furnish best local refer-
ences. Box 52.
FOR RENT
REASONABLY priced two room fur-
nished apartment. Corner East
University and Hill. State price.
Box 101 Michigan Daily. 13
FOR RENT: Suite, east, south and
west exposure. Private bath and
shower. Accommodates three. Extra
rooni available if group of four.
Steam heat. Dial 8544. 422 East
Washington. 71

RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY SHOP.
Moved across the street to 1114
South University. Soft water.
shampoo and finger wave, 50c.
Special on all permanents. Strictly
sanitary. 8x
VOICE BUILDING and singing. Pri-
vate and class lessons for juniors
and advance students. Grace John-
son Konold, 1908 Austin. Phone
4855. Formerly voice instructor in
School of Music. 5x
MAC'S TAXI - 4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
Watches....
THE TIME SHOP
1121 S. University Ave.

IF

UNIVERSITY GRILL
and tea room
Noon Luncheon
25c
Evening Special
Chicken and Steak Dinner
55c
Soups Pies Sandwiches
A la Carte. Service
Neva Vernilyea
615 EAST WILLIAM

11

IL

Are Now Much
Lower in Cot-
cheap photographs
as costly as ever -
Phone 4434
for an appointment

Tonight ...
I BSEN'S
Last Play, Recreated by
BORGNY HAMMER
"When
Wve Dead
Awaken""

is

$1.00 75c 50c

li-

_

Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre

Schaeberle Music House

203 East Liberty

Phone 6011

WE CARRY A COMPLETE SCHIRMER LIBRARY
See us about rental pianos. All Musical Instruments repaired.
DROP IN AND BROWSE AROUND

_,I

Last Times Today
'B roadway Melody
of 1936'
MAJESTIC
Starts Tomorrow
4 B Days

READ THE DAILY'S CLASSIFIED SECTION

it

DOLORES
DEL RIO
EVERE TT
MALRSHALL
U Y K I B B E E
AL.LEN JENKINS
S H A.W & L EE

MICHIGAN

t

L16

It

Have you ever wanted something really tasty, something cooked
just right by a shop which specializes in just a few special foods?
If so-
DROP IN AT
THE PILGR IM SHOP
and have some of the most delicious waffles, doughnuts, and

DAILY 1:30 - 11 P.M.
W H IT NEY
15c to 6 -25c After 6
Starting Today
FIRST A. A. SHOWING
"STREAM LI NE
EXPRESS"
with
VICTOR .JORY
EVELYN VENABLE
and
Ddfl n1VD7&N

- EXTRA FEATURE EDWARD TREVOR
I EMARGARET HAMILTON

III

I

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