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October 19, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE. V

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SAT DA'Y, OCTOBER 19, 1935

~LGET~I SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1935

Foreign Affairs
Will Be To ie
Of Castle Talk
Cbhdtictet Arraingment
Of Hoover Moratorium;
Famous In State Post
With the possibilities of foreign en-
tanglements dominating the Aineri-
can political scene of today, and with
the nation bewildered over questions
of "nut1alty," "sanctions" and "em-
bargs," the lecture by the Hon. Wil-
liam R. Castle on "Our Relations
with Other Nations" will be of special
interest and importance to residents
bfAnih Arbor.
Willham Castle is scheduled to talk
Otober 31 at Hill Auditorium as the
initial speaker on the 1935-36 Ora-
torical Lecture Series. This will be
fi f-st time that he has appeared
on a lecture course here in Ann Ar-
bor.
R&igsnized by man as one of the
country's most able diplomats, Castle
first achieved national prominence
under the Hoover administration. As
acting secretary of state he conducted
A 1Arge share of the delicate nego-
tiations which put into effect the one-
HeAr Hoover moratorium on war debts
iii July, 1931.
It'i tears in Sevice
He reached this place after a little
more than ten years in government
service, having been appointed a
"special assistant" to the department
of state in 1919. This was just after
he had finished two years of war
obik as diiector of the bureau of
communications of the American Red
Cross. Previously he had been editor
of the farvard Graduate Magazine
±rrin 1915 to 1917, and assistant dean
6t that university from 190'6 to 1913.
When finally named to the under-
secretaryship in the State Depart-
Ment upon ,the ,death of Joseph P.
Cotton in 1930, President Hoover ex-
plained that Castle hadtbeen selected
with a view to having the post held
by a "permanent man" outside the
influence of party politics.
Seit To Tokyo
As chief of the division of Western
6tf6jean affairs, Castle was sent to
'Tofk'o by President Hoover to serve
as temporary ambassador to Japan
at-.the time of the five-power naval
con.iference in 1930.
Tickets for the lecture, priced at
75 and 50 cents may be purchased at
th Hill Auditorium box office from
10-12 in the morning and from 2-4
if the afternoon on week days. Spe-
i'al si eson ticket prices are now sell-
ink at $3.50-2.75 for the eight lec-
t'ures scheduled on the oratrical
ctur e.
Kendall Fails
To See Italy's
Gain In Afrea
'rking Up Wrong Tree,'
Declares Geographer As,
He Describes Ethiopia
(Continued from Page 1)
the Abbai, or the Blue Nile, whic
flows out of it, cutting a deep canyon
in places up to 6,000 feet in depth,"
Dr. Kendall pointed out.
To the south, he said, the land is
high and dry, and around Addis
Ababa, the Ethiopian capital, it is
"gently undulating."
He described the whole of the high-
land area of the north as being "sim-
ilar to the Mediterranean lands in
climate, except that there is more

rain and that it conies during sun-
meir instead of winter."
These two regions, the northern
highlands and the southern desert, are
divided by the lower volcanic moun-
tains with their undrained salt lakes
Dr. Kendall said. This area narrows
toward the center of the country, be-
tween Addis Ababa and Harrar, where
the northern wall juts sharply to the
north, going through Aduwa into
Eritrea, and the southern edge cut:
amiost directly each to the coast of
British Somaliland, the geographer
stated.
Economically, Ethiopia is divider
into three sections, according to Dr.
Kendall. The first, the Kolla, he ex-
plained, is the land up to 6,000 feet,
which is very moist and has a high
uniform temperature. This land con-
tains tropical jungle, he said, and the
nomadic natives, of low culture anc
little political power, practice migra-
tory agriculture.
The second, which he termed the
Voina Dega, or wine highland, is the
land from 6,000 to 9,000 with a tem-
perature around 65 degrees. There
a little less rain here, Dr. Kehdall
staed, and it has a grassy vegetation,
contains the greatest number of the
pd6ulation, who also have the political
c6dA trol, and is the principal agricul-
tual country, yielding corn, wheat.
barley and wine; and around Harrar,
somne coffee.
The third section, the Dega, is the
highest, he continued. Its land rum
uph to 14,000 feet, and its tempera-
ture rarely rises above 52 degrees. It
.criiama %i~-a n nd wit mh PVPr-

Key Man In Egypt

-Associated Press Photo.
Adliiiral Sii- William fisher
(above), sole dictator of Egypt's
first line of defense, has been di-
recting some of the biggest naval
maneuvers ever held off shores of
the ancient kingdom.
'Pesonal' News
Service Spo nsored
Small Michigan daily and weekly
newspapers - those not maintaining
correspondents on the campus - are
to be informed of activities of their
home town students by the University
News Service, it was announced yes-
terday.
The News Service will be assisted by
the journalism department. The ad-
dition to the regular work of the News
Service has been made atthe sug-
gestion of state editors, according to
Wilfred B. Shaw, under whose direc-
tion it will be carried on. The idea,
he said, is to inform the smaller pa-
pers about students from their towns
who are on the campus.
"It is expected that the "personal"
news service will be generally wel-
comed by Michigan editors," Mr. Shaw
declared.
Seniors in the journalism depart-
ment who are assisting Dean C. Baker,
are Ruth Doisey, Phflip Trieze and
Clayton Sutton.
Quartet Will Start
Choral Uniob Bill
(Continued from Pate 1)
In order to avoid confusion or the loss
of tickets, it was asked that only the
coupon for the individual concert be
brought to the auditorium.
The program for tonight's concert
follows
rhy Sweet Singing Olmstead
Sleep, My Laddie Sleep Mortimer

Social Work
Group Holds
Round Tables
Phillip Callahan Speaks
On 'Administration Of
Old AgeAssistance'
(Continued from Page 1)
in the Hospitalization and Treatment
of Mental Patients in Michigan," by
Dr. Robert Haskell, of the Wayne
County Training School at North-
ville; and "Next Steps in Social Leg-
islation in Michigan," by Mr. Wil-
liam J. Norton, executive vice-presi-
dent and secretary of the Children's
Fund of Michigan.
The round-table discussion of "The
Training of Social Workers" was con-
tinued under the direction of Dr.
Maud Watson, director of the Chil-
dren's center, ahd instructor in the
Michigan Institute and Wayne Uni-
versity. The speakers who addressed
the group were Robert Kelso, direc-
tor of the Ihstitute of Health and So-
cial Sciences of Detroit, Mrs. Florence
Booth, supervisor-director of train-
ing, department of public welfare, De-
troit; Miss Hilda Shepherd, secretary
of the Social Service Bureau, Lansing
and Herman Pekarsky, director of
social service, Kent County Relief
Commission, Grand Rapids.
Many Speakers Present
The "Delinquency and Probation"
round table was addressed by a panel
of four speakers: Arthur Courteau
probation officer of the Wayne County
Juvenile Court, Andrew A. Bishop, as-
sistant state probation supervisor of
the Michigan State Welfare Depart-
ment, Walter C. Averill, Jr., State
director of emergency recreation and
William H. Venn, chief probation of-
ficer of the Wayne County Circuit
Court.
The round-table on "Supervisors
for Case Work," led by Miss Effie
Doane of the Illinois Fiergency Re-
lief Association, was concerned yes-
terday with a continuation of the dis-
cussion of the instruction and de-
velopment of case workers. Miss
Doane explained to the group the use
of the Leahy-Fenlason Rating Scale
for Social Workers, a test developed
at the University of Minnesota for
rating and recording the personalities
of prospective case workers.
Audience Takes Part
The round-table on the "Adminis-
tration of Old Age Assistance" was
conducted by Phillip A. Callahan of
the state Old Age Administration Bu-
reau, and Miss Dorothy Ketcham, di-
rector of the social service depart-
ment of the University led the round-
table on "The Unmarried \other and
Her Child" and the discussion was
carried on by the audience.
A discussion of "The Interpreta-
tion of Social Work" was led by
George B. Kirkendall, director of the
Community Welfare Fund, Inc. Mr
Kirkendall discussed the importance
of gaining public interest in welfare
work, and methods of presenting mea-
sures to the legislature.
Phillip H. Schafer of the state emer-
gency relief association, led a round-
table on the subject of "Homeless
Men"; the discussion was carried on
by a panel composed of Victor Wood-
ward, Hollis Rigterink and Bernard
Coggan.
REGULATION ADOPTED
LANSING, Oct. 18.- (/P)---The state
liquor controlcommission is deter-
mined that beer drinkers are going to
get what they order.
It adopted yesterday a new regula-
tion prohibiting its beer licensees from
substituting other brands for those
ordered by patrons. The regulation
provides that proprietors of beer
drinking establishments must display

Map Shows British Concentration In Africa
CR ETE (8R r/s YR)I
Mvfe dl.+I-e.r ran e a i-
Sea
/200.(A &vLISH PLANES
aASED A04 A/O BA,
PORT (
ALEXANDRIA5
HE LIOPOL)So ANAL i
CAIRO, SUEZ
BRITISH CON VERT
riNG CTIE /NTO
/6 BRITISH SUBMARINES Red
A REPORTED STATIONED( Sea
I RED SEA TO PROTECT
o ARMS SHIPS FOR ETIOPIA
aY
IE G -Y P T
50100 200 300 ANGLO EGYPTIAN
.. "J'1MILESS 5U DAN (9R/TISt),
-Associated Press Map
This map indicates major North African spots where the gritish have
established ooncentraition cainps as British-Italian relations have
reached a stage where the world awaits every move.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Sox numbers may be secured at no
sxtra charge.
Cash in advance 11c pet reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
1Oc per reading line for three or more
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
Minimum three lines per insertion.
from the date of last insertion.
By contract, per line - 2lines daily, one
month ....... ..........8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months.......8c
2 lines daily, college year.......7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months.........8c
100 lines used as desired.........9c
300 lines used as desired.........8c
1,000 lines usedas desired........7c
2,000 lines used 'as desired.......6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upperand lower case. Add
c per line to aboverrates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add 10c
per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 712 point
type.
NOTICES
TEACHER of popular and classical
piano music. Helen Louise Barnes.
Call 8469. 2x
WANTED
WANTED: Student to share apart-
ment with me. Kitchenette, very
reasonable. Must be gentile with
clean habits. Call 5321. 67

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. ix
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Suite, east, south and
west exposure. Private bath and
shower. Accommodates three. Ex-
tra room available if group of four.
Steam heat. Dial 8544. 422 E.
Washington. 63
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
9025: 906 Packard. Special Garbrie-
leen perm., $5.00 Shampoos, finger
wave. Open Mon., Wed., Fri. eve-
nings. 62
MAC'S TAXI -4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x *
LOST AND FOUND

[Classified drectory

Adult Education
Spea ker Defies
Woman's Status
Sex iscrimination Scored
By Mrs. Pinchot In Final
Lecture Of Conference
(Continued from Page 1)
to "sweatshops" in Pennsylvania
towns, and said that "wages, if they
can bie so called, ranged from 65 cents
to $4 weekly." It was the results of
investigations and strikes called and
ordained at her suggestion which fi-
nally brought the minimum wage
clause into the NRA.
Mrs. Pinchot scored the executives
of the NRA, saying that it was not
the p'rinciples of the ill-fated act that
brought about its ultimate destruc-
tion, but maladministration by petty
officials. This inefficiency extended
also to the "higher ups," and was the
deplorable feature of the NRA, she
said.
The bad feature of the planning
of the New Deal relief act was that
the government did not seem to real-
ize that good times were a cause of
high prices, and that the system could
not function the other way around,
Mrs. Pinchot remarked.
The concentration of wealth was
another situation deplored by Mrs.
Pinchot, although she stated that by
expenditure stabilization, this condi-
tion could be corrected.
In summary, Mrs. Pinchot said that
today was "indeed a day for organi-
zation, because in union there is
strength, and a proper safeguard
against communism is organization."
cards,naming the kinds of beer on
draft and must serve the kinds or-
dered.
Chairman John S. McDonald ex-
plained that cheaper beer often is sub-
stituted in filling a customer's order.
- , 11

I1

offers something. new of especial interesttownspeople,
faculty, fraternities and sororities-
With each Quart of Ice Cream yo ureceive bieeake,
serving up to eight persons - delivered for seventy
cents - on ten minutes notice.
FLAVORS
Chocolate Chip - French Vanilla - Buttered Almond
Peppermint Stick - Fruit Ice Cream, Rum Flavored
Orange Sherbet
Michigan Theatre Bldg. Dial 3644

LoST: A brown billfold containing
driver's license and laboratory de-
posit receipt. Reward. Edward Nel-
son. 1218 Washtenaw. Phone 8-2952.
66
atche s*.
THE TIME SHOP
1121 S. University Ave.
SLast Times Today
GOW, THE HEAD HUNTER"J
MICKEY MOUSE CARTOON
and other Short Subjects
- Sunday - Monday - Tuesday -
CLARK GABLE, JEAN HARLOW,
WALLACE BEERY in
" CHI NA SEAS"
Charles Ruggles in
"SMART GIRL"

Parting
Miss Do
Alma mia
Mel cor piu non mi sen
Ultima Canzone
Mr. Pinza
Ah! love but a day
Oh! quand Je dors
Aria, 'Waltz" from "R
Juliette"

Browning
Ernest Charles
e
Handel
to Paisiello
Tosti
Mrs. H. H.
A. Beach
Liszt

omeo et
G

TODAY
"WHOLE KAY
TOWN'S FRANCIS
TALKING" "STRANDED"
H I TNE'Y
Starting Sunday-
TWO FEATURES
OM bE AWEGH.
Et
NANCY CALROLL
LNOYD NOLAN
HARRY LANGDON
and
T6#'ILBEDA1 G
AU
O 1
NEW LWEL TORNMAS NN
NOVEL T KIHT ITYK

g l OMNOMM

MICHIGAN
Ending Tonight
NINO
MARTINI
SCHUMANN-HEINK
REGINALD DENNY
VICENTE ESCUDERO
GENEVIEVE TOBIN
ANiTA LOUISE
MARIA GAMBARELLI
e.

-ounod

Miss Mario
La Cara Rimembranza Donaudy
Mattinata Leoncavallo
Musica proibita Gastaldon
Mr. Martinelli
Goodnight Quartet from "Martha"
von Flotow
The Quartet
Duet: la ci darem la mano from
"Don Giovanni" Mozart
Miss Mario and Mr. Pinza
Duet: Ai nostri monti from "Il
Trovatore" Verdi
Mr. Martinelli and Miss Doe
Duet from "Madam butterfly"
Puccini
Miss Doe and Miss Mario
Duet: I Mulattieri Masini
Mr. Martinelli and Mr. Pinza
Bella figlia dell'amore from
"Rigoletto" Verdi
The Quartet

It' J ekenny
<'«,;:<r a dio's a ce
} wentertainer,.
' leading the way
to the greatest
musical show
ever to come
to the screen!
"ihJACK
ELEANOR
P OW1ELL
ROBERT.
TAYLOR
>eading Cast of 15 Starsl 2b0. Girs
M-G-M's NEWf GIA
1Vl=- V1S A T
At the
MAJESTC
Read The Want Ads

,
li -

Iiii

Schaeberle Music House

203 East Liberty

Phone 6011

- Extra --
Teamwork"
"Dangerous
Occupations"
Brevity
News
Sunday -
"SHIPMATES FO'2EVER"

i
i

WE CARRY A COMPLETE SCHIRMER LIBRARY
See us about rental pianos. All Musical Instruments repaired.
DROP IN AND BROWSE AROUND

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._

1869

1935

WVVhen You Casha Check..
HEN you cash or deposit a check for $100, drawn on a bank
in some other city, you may not realize what it will cost
your bank to collect that check.
For you the transaction is complete. It has not -occurred to
you that your bank has actually advanced you $100 of its own
money for several days until it can get the $100 back from the
bank in the other city, meanwhile losing the interest on this
amount.
Also, during this process of collection, your check must be
recorded, letters written, verified, mailed and otherwise han-
dled by many people.
This is ony one of the many valuable and costly services
that bank patrons sometimes "take for granted."

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