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October 18, 1935 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRMAT, OCTOBER 18, 1935

T HE MICHIGANI DAILY

PAGE FIVE

V~IDA1~ OCTOBER 18, 1935 1'AGE FIVE
I I

Riders' Club
Begins Year
With Tryouts
Crow And Saddle Division
Of Athletic Association
Will Welcome Members
The Crop and Saddle, organization
of women students who are interested
in riding, will begin its fall season
with tryouts for membership at 3
p.m. Saturday at the Mullison stables
at the fairgrounds.
Betty Greve, '36, president of the
club, announced last night that all
women students interested in riding,
who are eligible, are urged to attend
the tryouts, which are to be of a dif-
ferent nature than those of former
years.
Heretofore, each prospective mem-
ber has been required to mount a
horse and ride by the judges alone.
This year all tryouts will ride for an
hour on the road. Mrs. Robert Ly-
ons, prominent Ann Arbor horsewom-
an, has been invited to assist Miss
Greve with the judging. The names
of those who have been accepted for
membership will be announced im-
mediately after the tryouts.
Crop and Saddle, which is a branch
of the Women's Athletic Association,
has been prominent on campus for
several years. Its membership is lim-
ited to 21 students. Meetings con-
sist of weekly afternoon rides during
the fall and spring seasons, occas-
ionally varied by an evening, or sup-
per ride.
Each year in May the group spon-
sors a horse show, in which friends
are invited to participate. Last year's
show which was the second of its
kind, featured exhibition riding by
Mrs. Lyons and the two daughters
of Dr. F. L. Arner, Ann Arbor.
Miss Hilda Burr is faculty adviser
for thc club. Membership does not,
incur any expense except a charge for
the use of the horses at each meet-
ing. All expense of the horse show
is taken care of by the Women's Ath-
letic Association.
Martha Cook.
Holds Monthly
Formal Dinner
The first of the monthly Martha
Cook formal dinners was held Wed-
nesday, Oct. 16, in honor of Dr. and
Mrs. James Bruce, Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Jordan, and Mr. and Mrs. Fielding
Yost.
After dinner, while coffee was
served in the blue room, Mr. Yost re-
counted the history of the three
Michigan songs, The Yellow and the
Blue, The Victors, and Varsity, and
the part the composers of these songs
have played in Michigan's football
victories.
Following Mr. Yost's talk, June
Harber, '37, played a piano solo en-
titled Spanish Caprice, and Barbara
Strand, '37 accompanied by Jane
Lombard, '37 sung a group of vocal
numbers. Afterwards, all the girls
joined in singing the three Michigan
songs.
Eleanor Butzel, '36, was in charge.
Assisting her on the reception com-
mittee, were Claire Gorman '36, and
Betty Sherk, '37, and Virginia York,
37 headed the entertainment com-
mittee. The girls who served coffee
were Kathryn Keeler, '37, Susan Wil-
lard, '37, Jane Carson, '37, Irene Sart-
er, '37, and Betty Whitney, '37.
Outdoor Club Holds
Meeting Of Council

Robert G. Benz, '36, was elected
president at the first meeting of the
Council of the Outdoor Club, which
took place Monday night in the
hostess room of the League.
This club, open to both men and
women, furnishes an opportunity for
the enjoyment of outings such as are
not provided for by any other or-
ganization on campus. There are no
dues or particular restrictions on the
members.
The group has outlined an active
program for the year, which will in-
elude a variety of seasonal sports,
splash parties, picnics, hikes, skating,
skiing, horseback riding, canoeing,
and all-day outings. The first en-
tertainment will be a hayride, which
will take place at an early date.
INITIAL PINS
Initial pins are on the very crest of
their popularity. In addition to the
fobs, bar styles are finding fashion
favor.

Ileven American Women Are Listed As Being Fit To Serve As President Of The U. S.

Finish Decorations
For Union Formal
Plans for the decoration of the
Union ball room in preparation for
the Union Formal to be held Friday
night, Oct. 25, are practically com-
pleted, George Malone, Union execu-
tive councilman in charge of the dec-
orations, stated last night.
Union officials announced that
tickets for the Formal could be pur-
chased at either the Union desk or
from junior members of the Union
student organization. As a heavy ad-
vance sale has been reported thus far,
John McCarthy, recording secretary
emphasized the necessity of buying
the tickets early.
Sally Sage, well known night club
entertainer and singer, will be fea-
tured with Danny Russo and his
Orioles, who have been contracted to
play for the dance.
JEWELRY and
WATCH REPAIRING
HALLER'S Jewelry
State at Liberty

SCREEN STAR HERE
Hal LeRoy, musical comedy and
screen star, was a guest at the Sigma
Nu house Wednesday noon. LeRoy,
brother-in-law of Paul S. Dod, '37A;
is appearing this week at the Chrysler
Convention in Detroit with the Bos-
well Sisters.
CORRECTION
The Observatory Barber Shop
and Beauty Parlor, 1402 Wash-
ngton Heights, is near the
Nurses' Home with Alice Ber-
geron, Proprietor.

III

SMARTEST
Hosiery Shoppe
300-A South State Street
Extra Sheer Hose
69c - 89c - 97c
New Two-Way Stretch Girdle
$1.00 and $2.00

-Associated Press Photo.
The following women, because of their administrative ability and suf ficient understanding of social and economic problems, are considered as
good Presidential timbcr: (upper row, left to right) Emily Newell Blair, Ju dge Florence E. Allen, Lillian M. Gilbreth, Josephine Roche, Grace Morrison
Poole and Mary Van Kleeck, and (bottom row, left to right) Secretary o f Labor Perkins, Ruth Hanna McCormick Simms, Mrs. Roosevelt, Charl
Ormond Williams and Ruth Bryan Owen, minister to Denmark.

IF

4,

Egge Presents New Source Of
Entertainment, Koella Reports

Norway's Great Dramatist
Has Strong Personality,
Although Reserved
By LOUISE E. MARS
Norway's greatest contemporary
drarmatist, Peter Egge, offers Amer-
ican theater-goers a comparatively
undiscovered source of intellectual
recreation, in the opinion of Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Koella, who visited the
writer in Oslo this summer.
Local Interest
Local interest in Egge will be stim-
ulated by the fact that his "Love and
Friendship" will be presented Thurs-
day, Oct. 24, in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theater. "Love and Friend-
ship" presents an outstandingly bril-
liant professor of literature, dealing
with his activities with a beautiful
authoress whose literary success has
been mediocre.
Mr. and Mrs. Koella were im-
pressed by the unpretentious appear-
ance of the dramatist. Their con-
versations with him, however, re-
vealed a forceful personality which is
contrasted by his humbleness and
extreme cordiality. Although the
Koellas found Egge a willing and ver-
satile conversationalist, they were
struck by his great interest in writ-
ing, a pursuit which he leaves only
to execute duties as president of the
Norwegian Authors Association.
Born in a laborer's household in
Trondheim among the fjords of
northern Norway, Egge, assimilated
the country atmosphere which he
later used to form a basis for many
of his plays. His first attempt to
gain an education, an application
for a scholarship in a local college,;
turned into a dismal failure.
Autobiography Illuminating
A more accurate dilineation of the
facts of his early career is found in
an autobiography of which Mr. Koel-
la has made the following transla-
tion:
"There exists as one knows brave,
young adventure-seeking men who
have nothing against going out in the
world and risking absolutely all when
they only can meet with something
that dazzles and elates. The blows
that they get, they take with humor.
If the day is bad today, then it is

beautiful tomorrow or the day after
tomorrow. Such is the life of the poor
globe-trotter.
A Sensiitive Man
I did not belong to these bold,
young, adventure-seeking men. I was
sensitive. I had absolutely no liking
to go out searching for adventure in
the foreign country. I would rather
live in the country and study lan-
guages and history of civilization and
write immortal poetical works, even
if I had experienced the surprising
rcvelation that nobody would have
even if one would not publish it!
Mrs. Koelia further translated a
portion of the autobiography which
dealt with his life work: "Other
nice people ask me: 'Why do you
write such sad books?' I answer that
there practically does not exist other
sad books than those destitute of tal-
ent. Then the nice people shake their
heads and the conversation drops."
The Norwegian dramatist, whose
first work was published at the age
of 22, contined his autobiography
to look back on an outstandingly pro-
lific career: "A poet whose -world re-
nown'is doubtful, and whose truthful-
ness is also doubtful, sometimes grue-
some, said once to me, 'I have read
your novel "The Dream" three times,
but every time I have had difficulty
in reading it through because of
tears.' To such a remark I have only
to say that my books could not, of
course, be different than I am.
Relatively' Young
Although his works reflect a clear
grasp of world problems and con-
flicts, Egge is a relatively young man
among the great dramatists of the
present era. Born in 1896, he has
already made many outstanding con-
tributions to the serious drama field,
Mr. Koella stated. He has never vis-
ited the United States, although he
once crossed the Atlantic on a sail-
ing vessel bearing naptha. He
participates but rarely in the pere-
grinations which characterize many
modern writers, but it is his policy
to settle temporarily in a country to
observe the natives and their cus-
toms. Egge has often expressed the
feeling that he is less lonely abroad
than at home, for in his sojourns he is
always accompanied by his wife and
children.

Bright Knitted Suit
Is Advocated For
Football Week-End
By RUTH SAUER
When you are in a Pullman car
chugging merrily off to Madison for
the Wolverine-Badger game, you will
want to be smartly and sensibly dres-
sed. A suit of knitted worsted or
tweed in the new fall colors will be
appropriate as well as becoming.
Here is an inspiration from a dress
we saw on the campus recently - a
knitted skirt and jacket of dubennier,
that new shade between rust and rose,
and a brown blouse of knitted pop-
corn stitch. In case the thermometer
drops, a lapin swagger coat will add
the necessary warmth.
As for accessories, buckles on shoes
are very fashionable, and you will
certainly want one of the new sport
handkerchiefs trimmed in ric-rac
that are also big enough to be prac-
tical.
If you are going out after the game,
here is a little secret - have you
heard about "Crystelle?" It is the
new crush-proof, wrinkle-proof, wet-
proof material that is threatening to
take the place of velvet. When you
see it in the stores, in the enchanting
shades of raspberry, royal blue, and
piper green, you will want a dress of
it to take along. You can tuck it in
your week-end bag with your tooth-
brush, and when you arrive in Madi-
son, just take it out, shake out the
wrinkles, and it is ready to wear! You
will find it quite charming trimmed
with a rhinestone pendant or clips

Directors Pour
For Tea Dance
At Mosher Hall
A joint tea-dance for Mosher-Jor-
dan Halls was held in Mosher from
4 to 5 p.m. yesterday. Piano music
for dancing was furnished by Ed
Schmitt. Decorations consisted of
autumn flowers and candles.
Angel Maliszewski, '38, in charge
of the tea-dance was assisted by the
following committee: Nancy Kover,
'38, Catherine Bourne, '38, Evelyn
Tripp, '39, Mary Horkan, '38, Helen
Jeperson, '38, Thelma Mermelstein,
'38, Margaret Ferris, '38, and Dorothy
Gittleman, '38.
Those who poured were Mrs. Kath-
aleen W. Codd, social director of
Martha Cook dormitory, Mrs. Ruth
Danielson, director of Helen New-
berry Residence, Miss Ann Vardon,
house director of Betsy Barbour and
Miss Sarah Rowe, house director of
Martha Cook.
Interfraternity Council
Announces Ticket Sellout
All tickets available for the In-
terfraternity Ball to be given Friday,
Nov. 1, in the League Ballroom have
been sold, officials of the Interfra-
ternity Council announced yesterday.
Three hundred tickets were placed
on sale Tuesday, Oct. 8, and were
either sold or reserved by 9 p.m. Wed-
nesday.
Chick Webb and his National
Broadcasting System orchestra have
been engaged to play for the ball.

1f ' "l
i ' ' ' gF ". {j

The

Here you
Girls!

'SHIVER-NO-MORE'
by Kayser
YOU'LL certainly keep warm,
calm, and collected in one of
these wooly sleeping affairs by
Kayser. They're the last word
in two-piece smartness, and
practicability . . . knitted of silk
and wool ... and wash in a jiffy
... no ironing, just pull them
into shape.

are

$2.00

GOODYEAR'S
COLLEGE SHOPS
713 North University
Telephone 4171
Kayser's nighties and pajamas in
other styles at the downtown
store also.

ri

Important "Incidentals"
for Every Co-ed's
Wardrobe

JACOBSON'S
FRIDAY and SATURDAY

li''

- _ _. -

_ _ __--- - - - - - i

Schaeberle Music House
203 East Liberty Phone 6011
WE CARRY A COMPLETE SCHIRMER LIBRARY

i

A..

See us about rental pianos. All Musical Instrum
DROP IN AND BROWSE AROUN

gents repaired.
JD

-- - - . _m

BLOUSES . . . crepes and
satins, tailored and dress
types. In all the new fall
shades.
2.50 to 4.95
SWEATERS .. . slip-overs in
shirt types, turtle and crew-
neck styles, and hand-knitted
effects.
3.00
VELVETEENS.. .blouses and
jackets in delectably bright
shades.
4.95 and 5.95
f- VA 4 k

I

IT'S the little things that
count in the life of the
well-dressed student. A smart
blouse, bright sweater, and a
good looking skirt can do
wonders toward pepping up
and variegatng your every-
day ward.
LUMBERJACKETS... cord-
uroys ... the warmest things
you could wear on blustery
days.
3.50
JERSEYS... adorable styles,
and rich autumn shades. A
style for every type.
3.00
SKIRTS ... imported wool-
ens, flannels, and worsteds,
perfectly tailored.
3.50to 5.95

The

Miehigan
League

. O a sueded eather
that's "marked" for
a great future

Presents the

HOLEPROOF and BELDING
HOSI E RY

Silver Grill

BALLROOM

Other Styles $3.95
Use Your
bCharge Account

NEW
69c

FALL SHADES
79c $1.00

i

With AL COWAN

Strictly a tailored leather! There's a suggestion
of ruggedness ... of good-hard-wear-and-not-
showing-it ... about this new leather. Connie

11

I FALL SWEATERS

I

11 -

III

II I FALL SWEATERS II U

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