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October 08, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-08

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rUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1935 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Kipke Primes

Team For Conference Opener

With Hoosiers

Squad Drills
To Strengthen
Passing Attack

More Individual
Is Necessary As
Renews Practice

Speed
Varsity

Injuries Cut Team
End, Center Positions In
Doubt; Wright, Amrine,
Schuman Try For Berth
Using the Michigan State defeat
as an example showing the necessity
for greater speed and cleaner blocking
and tackling, Coach Harry Kipke
turned his attention from Saturday's
loss to the Big Ten opener against
Indiana University this week end and
began preparations for what Mich-
igan fans hope will be the Varsity's
first Conference win in two seasons.
Coach Kipke, anxious to strengthen
an already potent air attack and to
develop the running offense, which is
weak despite the fact that it showed
to better advantage against the Spar-
tans Saturday than in the 1934
opener, had the first eleven running
through new pass and ground plays.
Captain Bill Renner drew the pass-
ing assignment, of course, assisted by
Johnny Smithers, sophomore half
back. Stark Ritchie carried the ball
in the new ground plays.
Ziem Out
With Fred Ziem, sophomore line-
man, suffering from a knee injury
that will probably keep him out of
the Indiana tilt, Kipke shifted Chet
Stabovitz, who played end until he
suffered a broken thumb two weeks
ago, to the right guard position in
hopes of finding a fast, sure blocking
player to give spark to the center of
the line.
Should Stabovitz fail to come up
to the necessary requirements, Bud
Hanshue, Jesse Garber or Ernie Pe-
derson will take Ziem's place. Frank
Bissel, toy lineman, filled the left
guard position.
Bud Hanshue, who has seen service
at both the tackle and guard position,
was at the right tackle in place of Jim
Lincoln who replaced Johnny Vier-
gever at the other tackle. Viergever
suffered a bruised leg muscle Satur-
day and will be out for several days.
Indecision also marked the selec-
tion of the center. Joe Rinaldi, soph-
omore pivot man, who has been in
the Health Service with a "consti-
tutional cold" will be released today,
but it is doubtful if he will have re-
gained enough strength to start
against the Hoosiers.
Wright At Center
Harry Wright was at the center
position yesterday, but Coach Kipke
indicated that he was not at all cer-
tin whether Wright, Bob Amrine, or
Stan Schuman would take the field
in place of Rinaldi.
The end positions were still dom-
inated by Matt Patanelli, Mike Sav-
age, and Art Valpey. Patanelli held
down the left end while Valpey and
Savage alternated at the other flank
post.
Cedric Sweet, Johnny Smithers,
Stark Ritchie, and Capt. Bill Renner
were the choice backfield combina-
tion. Observers feel that with an-
other week to regain his strength,
Ritchie will regain the running form
that marked his play last spring.
Chris Everhardus, handicapped by
a neck injury, saw but little action.
In punting practice early in the
afternoon "Skinny" Nelson and Bob
Campbell were outstanding, getting
off some fine kicks.
CALL FRESHMAN BOXERS
All freshnen interested in box-
ing are asked to meet in the box-
ing room of Waterman Gym at
4 p.m. Wednesday afternoon.
SEE OUR NEW
Wool
and Suede

Jackets
(FANCY BACK)
COSSACK STYLE
5.50 to 8.50
WOOL REEFERS AND
CORDUROY COATS
(Wool and Slicker Lined)
$7.50
The NEW
CORDUROY SLACK
in window pane patterns

Ben gals Whip
Cubs In Ninth
To Win Series
(Continued from Page 1)
trying for Mickey. The ball glanced
off Cochrane's shoulder and he was
safe. Goose Goslin, the Flying Goose
whom Detroit got from Washington
in exchange for Jonathan Stone in
the fall of 1933, approached the plate.
The Goose, always considered a clutc.
hitter, fouled the first pitch against
the right field boxes. French wound
up and let the ball go. Goslin met it
squarely and it saied over second
base out of reach of Billy Herman,
who seemed to realizesthat it was a
safe hit before he started for it.
Cochrane raced across the plate with
the winning run and the crowd
swarmed out on the field in a mill-
ing, swirling pool, engulfing players
of both teams as they fought their
way to the club house. The final
score was 4-3, and the Tigers had
crowned themselves champions of the
world as a result of this, their fourth
victory in six games.
Tigers Score in First
The Bengals got three lusty base
hits in their half of the first inning,
but were able to count only once.
After Hack threw out Clifton, Coch-
rane drove a single to left and Geh-
ringer followed with another to right.
Goslin popped to Jurges, but Pete Fox
clouted a drive that fell fair on which
Cochrane scored and Gehringer went
to third. Gee Walker was given an
intentional pass, filling the bases, but
when Rogell rolled to French, Geh-
ringer was forced at the plate. French
to Hartnett.
The Cubs tied it up in the third
on singles by Jurges, Galan and Her-
man, but the Tigers forged ahead
again in 'the fourth. Walker and
Rogell singled. Owen tried to sacri-
fice, but Hack made a nice play on
his bunt and forced Rogell at second,
Walker going to third and Owen being
safe at first. Bridges grounded to
Hack who tried for a double play.
Owen was out at second, but Bridges
beat the throw to first, and Walker
scored.
The Cubs went into the lead for
the first time in the fifth inning,
when with two out, and Jurges on
first as a result of his single, Billy
Herman poled a home run high into
the left field stands.
Tie Score Again
Detroit was retired in order in the
fifth but in the sixth with two down,
Bill Rogell slapped a double into the
extreme left field corner. Marvin
Owen, who had not hit safely in the
series up to this point, came through
with his first hit, a ringing single
to left on which Rogell romped home,
tying up the ball game once more.
Both clubs got men on base in the
seventh and eighth, but failed to
score when the pitchers, well support-
ed by their respective mates, bore
down and retired the side. Bridges
did not issue a pass in the entire
game, and both he and French struck
out seven men.
Following the epoch-making ninth
with its drama-packed play a happy
excited throng of ardent Tiger sup-
If you are set on pay-
ing a top price for
your Suit, O'coat, or
Topcoat. .. You can
stop at these head-
lines....

The HOT
STOVE
- By BILL REED --

Goose Wins Series

t1 d

I

igan fans without exception who
credit the Spartans with one of the
finest teams in the country' and
Michigan with an outfit much im-
proved from last year, as they have
denounced any intention to quit the
ship.
LISTEN TO FATHER
Commodore James S. Y. Tyson,
veteran boat-racing official of Chest-
nut Hill, Pa., has taught one son
and two daughters how to become
national figures in motorboat com-
petition. They hold two world re-
cords.

11

11

!I

I

The "Old Flying Red Goose of
Salem, New Jersey" came through
for the second time in succession
only this time he won the series
for Cochrane's Tigers. Goslin, a
great money player, singled in the
ninth with two out to score Coch-
rane with the winning run.
porters pressed cut of the park to
commence celebrating the Tiger vic-
tory. The whole town was baseball
mad. The streets in downtown De-
troit were covered with streamers,
floating paper filled the air, and an
incessant honking of horns continued
for several hours after the game. De-
troit had taken the Series and all
Detroit was happy.
25 ENTER FUTURITY
From 20 to 25 of the country's
ranking 2-year-olds are expected to
face the barrier in the Futurity at
Belmont Park Oct. 12. With 20
starters, the race will gros $86,000,
ranking second in value only to the
Santa Anita handicap.

Bachman Predicts State
Will Remain Undefeated
EAST LANSING, Oct. 7. -UP)-
Charley Bachman, coach of the Mich-
igan State College football team that
ran wild over Michigan Saturday,
predicted today his Spartans will go
through the season undefeated, bar-
ring an attack of over-confidence. He
gave the victorious regulars a day off
to rest and celebrate their achieve-
ment.

Monday, day of post-mortem bou- I
quets -and brickbats wherever foot-
ball is played, brought the usual
awards in the local camp.
First, bouquets to Michigan State
for a team whose like Michigan fol-
lowers hope will not beeseenpin the
Stadium again this year. And to
Coach Charlie Bachman for welding
one of the finest lines ever to play to-
gether in front of a backfield which
has everything, and everyone a
blocker.
Brickbats to the Michigan State
partisan who made one corner of the
press box miserable by claiming
everything buthRockne's Memorial
for State on the first four Spartan
plays, then to a lack of what makes
violin strings, to put it graphically,
when Michigan took the ball down
the field immediately thereafter.
Bouquets to Bill Renner, who blast-
ed the myth that he was no more
than a glass athlete as he took every-
thing that was dished out to him and
then some, playing a heady game
throughout.
And not the smallest bouquet to
Phil Pack, for his purged press box
for newspapermen, and for his re-
freshments.
Wallie Weber brings a bouquet from
Evanston, for the "Most beautiful"
sight in his life, the Purdue band with
lighted instruments marching in the
darkened stadium between halves of
the Boilermaker-Northwestern night
game.
And still another bouquet to Mich-

A COILEGE PROFESSOR DISCOVERED
That Often It Isn't a Student's Brain but his Pen
that Runs Dry-causes Failure-in Classes and Exams?
So he invented this sacless Vacumatic, and Parker engineered it to perfection-gave it
102% more Ink Capacity-made its Ink Level VISIBLE, so it suddenly can't go empty!

,I- -- - T _ --. - - _ - - - -_.- _ -= __-_ - - --- -=-=ill

I

CORONAS
C** * 1

Also-New Royal, Un-
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Noiseless, portable type-
writers. Priced $ 3 2.5 0
and up.

Y ES, a scientist on the faculty of
the University of Wisconsin was
amazed to find how pens that run
out of ink slow down classes, de-
moralize thinking, and bring marks
that no student wants to write home
a bout.
His observations led to the birth of
the revolutionary Parker Vacumatic.
This miracle pen writes 12,000 words
'arke-r
GUARANTEED MECHANICALLY PERFECT
Junior, $5Pencils, $2.50,
Over-Size, 4. $3.50 and $5

from a single filling-shows when it's Go and
running low-tells when to refill! ways witi
Any good store selling pens will Gold 'om
show you how the Parker Yacumatic inum-ski
eliminates 14 old-time parts, includ- both side
ing the lever filler and rubber ink sac lip so it <
found in sac-type pens.
And due to this,it has WRITESTWOWAYS
double room for ink, with-
out increase in size.
But don't think that
sacless pens containinga
saurt n pumps darike
Parker's patented Vacu- k
matic. This new creation
contains none of these. pzyt~0not s
That's why it's GUARAN-
TEED M EC H ANICA LLY
PERFECT! WITHOUT ADJUSTMENT

Used typewriters accepted in part payment. Con-
venient terms may be arranged. We rent all makes
of portables and allow initial rental to apply on
purchase.
04DoMORRILL
314 South State Street

CALKINS-FLETCHER DRUG STORES

Typew

The Stationery and Typewriter Store.
riters of all makes bought, sold, rented, exchanged,
cleaned, or repaired.

THREE DEPENDABLE

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324 South State

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Since 1908 Phone 6615

OVER -THE -COUNTER

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We haven't a $65 gar-
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the reason that our gar-
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of men to whom $100
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This is a value show as
well as a beauty exhibit.
The most expensive
fabrics tailored by
MICHAELS STERN
$25.00 to $40.00

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Berins

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AT SCHOOL OF MUSIC OFFICE on MAYNARD STREET

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{'lIl U II

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