100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO,

. dHE MICG1A1 9XN D A! Y"

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1935

Midhigan Meii
Will Speak At
M .A. Session
it' University Members
ToTake PartiiPnrogramI
Of EducationGroup
Registrar To Iecture
Ann Arbor High Schools
A o flave Large Number
Of Representatives
Several members of the University
and the University High School are
sbheduled to speak -at the meeting of
Region Six of the Michigan Educa-
tion Association Institute to be held
at the Masonic Temple in Detroit
dctobr 10 -d 11.
l1? r .. t';, P rni hwill spc'^k
on te.Y2Ua ' " qurnm
of the a:'a 1 : 1Kre rifr,;
m eetin n ?,_ K Poll ck :
th e p a>i.c er> t i o ; ?. ..
addes 'a 'ieri ari o he P~
stituan' ...11h'icrcvx Po'0ition of
th'e T'ahec ' tf'16 u also disc _s
good govertnmor the meeting o
the sbtial ii w' 'Lwi-n 'i, Fridy
and condut cia "tihubox.
6.t To Speak
O h er Universiy members who will
speak 'e Prof. S. A. Courtis, of the
School of Education, who will discuss
"The Individualized Recitation;"
Prof. L J. Carr of the sociology de-
partm ent, who will speak on "The
Fuhction of the School in the Pre-
veition of Delinquency;" Prof. Ed-
gar Johnston, of the School of Ed-
ucation, who's topic will be "Charac-
ter-Forming Possibilities in School
Iiscipline;" and Prof. Howard Y.
Vicdlusky, of the School of Education,
who will discuss "The Function of
the Teacher in Giving individual
duidance." Prof. David Mattern of
the School of Music, will be a jury
n1einer in the meeting of the music
division, and Dr. C. A. Fisher, assist-
ant director of the University Exten-
sion Division and chairman of parent
education of the Michigan Congress
of Parents and Teachers, will address
the Thursday meeting of the parent-
teacher division.
High Schools To Cooperate
Members of Ann Arbor schools who
will participate in the meeting are
Sarah Keen, Ann Arbor High School,
who s secretary of the Association;
J. W. Trytten, counseler University
High School; Edgar G. Johnston,
principal, University High School;
Kermit Eby, Ann Arbor High School;
Dorothy Buckley, principal, Angell
School; Mrs. Eula Avery, Perry
School; Fred. Walcott, University
High School; Cordelia M. Hayes, Uni-
versity High School; Edith M. Bader,
of Ann Arbor; and E. A. Walter, Ann
Aibor High School.
Region Six of the Michigan Educa-
tion: Association includes the coun-
tid of Oakland, Washtenaw, Ma-
comb, St. Clair, and Monroe. The As-
sociation's membership in this Region
during the past school year was 2,847.
Prof. H.M. Jones

1 -1

Ethiopian's Soldiers See n Leaving Addis Ababa

BOX SCORE

s
*9sne Doetr

BOX SCORE
CHICAGO

Ab R
Galan, if.........5 0
Herman, 2b......4 1
Klein, rf.........4 0
Hartnett, c........4 0
Demaree, cf......4 0
Cavareetta, lb. 4 0
Hack,3b.........4 0
Jurgess, ss.......4 1
French, p ........4 1

H
1
3
1
2
0
1
2
1
1

O
0
2
3
0
9
0
8
0
3
1

A
0
4
0
1
4
2
2

E,
0!
0
0
0
0
0

Totals.......37 3 12*26 140
*Two out when winning run scored.

DE

Clifton, 3b ....
Cochrane, c .. .
Gehringer, 2b .
Goslin, lf .....
Fox, rf......
Walker, cf ....
Rogell, ss ......
Owen, lb .....
Bridges, p .....
Totals ....

ETROIT
Ab R
....5 0
....5 2
. 5 0
....5 0
. .. ..4 0
....2 1
. . ...4 1
....3 0
....4 0

H
0
3
2
1
2
1
2
1
0

0
2
7
0
2
3
0
2
11
0

A'
0
0
4'
0'
1
0
3
0'
3

E
0.
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place ad e tisements with Classified
Advertising Department, Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance lie per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or more
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephone rate--15c per reading line
for two or more insertions.
10 discount if paid within ten days
Minimum three lines per insertion.
from the date of last insertion.
By contract, per line - 2 lines daily, one
month........................c
4 lnes Ei. 2 months .......
2 lines daily, college year ........7e
4 lines E.O.D., college year........7c
100 lines used as desired .......... 9c
308 lines used as desired ..........8c
1,000 lines used as desired .........'7c
2,000 lines used as desired . . ..6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
Sc pertline toabove rateswfor all capital
letters. Add 6e pex line to above for
bola~ face, upper and lower case. Add 10c
per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7%2 point
'ype.
PERSONALS
STATIONERY: Printed with your
name and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes, $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press. 305 Maynard. 9x
1917 War Das
Are Recalleu"d

LAUNDRY
EXPERIENCED laundress, doing stu-
dents' laundry. Will call for and
deliver. Telephone 4863. 7x
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
LAUNDRY Wanted. Student and
Co-ed. Mengs shirts 100. Silks,
wools our specialty. All bundles
done separately -no markings.
Personal satisfaction guaranteed.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594
anytime until 7 :09: Silver Laundry
607 E. Hoover. 4x
WANTED
WANTED:' Student and family laun-
dry. Reasonable rates. Will call
for and deliver. Phone 2-3669. 11
TO AN AMBITIOUS student needing
money, we have a good proposition
selling latex bandages. Factories,
farmers and housewives will quickly
buy. Sells at 50c; costs you 9c. Two
hours per day, 5 days per week will
pay all your college expenses. Quick
Bandages, 801 N. Sangamon St.,
Chicago, Ill. 42
WANTED: Used Spanish guitar in
good condition. Call J. L. Frost,
5139. 42
NOTICES
rEACHER of popular and classical
piano music. Helen Louise Barnes.
Call 8469.2x

PROFESSIONAL SERV ICES

VOICE BUILDING and singing. Pri-
vate and class lessons for juniors
and advance students. Grace
Johnson Konold, 1908 Austin.
Phone 4855. Formerly voice in-
structor in School of Music. 5x
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
Call the Kempf Music Studios for
artistic piano tuning. Terms rea-
sonable. Phone 6328. 15
MACS TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Unused set of drafting
instruments suitable for University
work. R. A. Price. Phone 4293. 39
LOST'AND FOUND
LOST: Grey hat. Saturday afternoon.
Yellow and blue feather. Telephone
2-2020. 41

...37 4-12 27 11 1f

..w

-Associated Press Photo.
Marching to the frent. Thcs . EthiE an oldiers were caught by the
pho ographer as the were ordered from Addis Ababa to strengthen fron-
tier sectors where the fitst Italian 'attack 'came.
Education Cooperation Bureau
To Enlarge Inspection Scope

Chicago- 001 020 000-3
Detroit- 100 101 001-4
Two base hits-Hack ,Fox, Gehr-
inger, Rogell.
Three base hit-Hack.
Home runs-Herman.
Sacrifice hit-Walker.-
Runs batted in-Herman 3, Fox,
Bridges, Owen.
Double play-Gehringer, Rogell to
Greenberg.
Left on bases-Chicago 6, Detroit
9.
Base on balls-Off French 2.
Struck out-By French 7, by
Bridges 7.
Umpires-Quigley NL), ( McGow-
an (NL), Stark (NL) and Moriarty
(AL).
Attendance-48 420.
anchester crash
Is Fatal To Worker
One man was killed and three
persons injured when the automo-
bile in which they were riding at
high speed failed to make a curve

1

I

l --! I I -

WATCH ES
The TIME SHOP
1121 South University Ave.
genine engraved
STATIONERY
At the Lowest Prices
in History!
Visiting Cards
100 paneled cards, choice of 4
sizes and 30 styles of'engrav-
ing,Plate Included, only $1.50'
Socia,,Stationery
Special styles for men and
women. A choice of lovely,
colors, monograms and styles
of engraving, Plate Included,
$2.00, $3.95 and 'up
LOW ERY
Printing Company
611 E. William St. Ph. 8758

g

i
1

:;
1

s.
J
C

Co-Edits Volume
trOn Literature
Prof. Howard M. Jones of the Eng-
lish department and Prof. Ernest E.
Leisy, Southern Methodist Univer-
sity. Dallas, Texas, have edited a new
h-ok on American Literature, entitled
"M-' "r Ameri'an Writers,"
""y nd years introductory
n American literature have
-.d i n-'lde everything from Cap-
^. n J hn Smith to the latest nov-
'T' " S'udents as a result suffered
-,7 n4^l indi-estion. Our book
'a o -efrrm the literary vege-
table oup whi:h has existed up to
now. It, includes only the meat of
American literature."
In their efforts to make a more
concise and satisfactory text, every-
thing which was not especially im-
portant was thrown out. The fin-
ished book includes about thirty of
the more important American 'au-
thors, beginning with William Byrd
andl ending with Frank Morris.
The introduction, which was writ-
ten by Professor Jones, deals with the
interpretation of American literary
history.
Five years were required to com-
plete the book which is 1,521 pages
long. It is being used in the Univer-
sity at the present time. Harcourt
appi Brace Co. pulished the book
during the latter part of August.
BUJSSES DIESEL POWERED
LONDON, Oct. 5. - (MP) -- One of"
the biggest victories yet gained by
the Diesel engine is revealed in an
announcement by London Transport
that it will equip all its 6,000 busses
and coaches with the oil-burning
type as fast as replacements become
necessary.

Already-formed plans for the Bu-
reau of Cooperation with Educational
Institutions are indicative that ac-
tivities this year will be equally as
extensive as in the year 1934-35, it
was announced yesterday by the of-
fice of Prof. George E. Carrothers, di-'
rector of the bureau.
Students working under the F.E.R.
A. set-up assigned to the bureau last'
year made possible tabulation of
numerous statistical data into one
of the most comprehensive reports of
the past few years, and work along'
the same linge will be continued with
N. Y: A. assistance this year.
Working in cooperation with the
State Department of Public Instruc-
tion in Lansing, the Bureau has been
able to enlarge its scope from its
previous limited inspection of state
high schools for benefit of University
admission officers, to various other
projects which include the collection
of exhaustive data on teachers' sal-
aries and teacher-loads, cooperation
with secondary schools in regard to
administrative problems, and aid to
other colleges in the state in deciding
a standard for admission to institu-
tions of higher learning. Compila-
tion of material in this endeavor has
led to a new plan of admission which
will go into effect September, 1937.
To Visit High Schools
Representatives of the Bureau will
resume their annual visits to secon-
dary schools throughout the state as
soon as the semester has a few weeks
start, submitting a report which will
decide the accrediting standing of
the school.
A summary of the situation in the
high schools of the state for the last
six years shows that the economic
depression affected schools starting
with the year 1930, continuing to
grow worse until it reached its lowest
point in 1933-34. The situation
seemed improved in all items accord-
ing to figures of 1934-35.
During the six year period ending
in 1934-35, boys had gained a larger
proportion of total high school en-
rollment, as well as in graduating
classes.
Employment Figures Drop
Under ordinary conditions these
schools employ new teachers to the
extent of about one-fifth of their staff
each year. During the depression'
statistics show that employment of
new teachers dropped to 6 per cent of
the total staff.
Percentage of teacher loads had a
considerable increase during the per-
iod studied. Schools having pupil
loads of 30 or more to a teacher rose
sharply from none in the first year to
25 per cent in 1933-34, with the pres-
ent year showing some improvement.
Daily 1:30 to 11 P.M.
W HITNEY
15c to 6 -25c after
Now

While the average
teachers employed in
had fallen off during t
years under observation
by the last report of th
an improved condition
in view of the fact tha
number of teachers ha
12.2 per school in 1933
1934-35.

Another feature of state high
schools suffering at the hands of the
depression is the library, with per
pupil expenses decreasing throughout
the period. A cost per enrolled stu-
dent of $2.08 in 1929-30 is compared
to the 39 cents per pupil cost in 1933-
34.

- I-,-- -f

number of and crashed into a telephone pole near
high schools Manchester, Saturday night. Eugene
he last of the Jasper Cornwell, 21, Cerro Gordon,
, it was shown Ill., worker at' an onion farm near
e Bureau that Manchester, died instantly.
was foreseen The injured are: Akel Salyer,
t the average Bridgewater, the driver of the car,
id risen from who suffered cuts dn the head; Jean
-34 to 12.8 in Kent, 17, Manchester, cuts on the
head and legs; and Iola Mathias, 17,
--- Manchester, cuts on the head and
h. n I

(Continued from Page 1)
"flu" masks, designed by a University
doctor. They consisted of three or
four strips of tape and a few layers
of cheese cloth, and students were re-
quired to wear them at all times, being
dismissed from class if they were
without them. Professor Everett tells
of the difficulty of carrying on a class
with everyone talking through sev-
eral layers of cheese cloth in muffled
voices. Another doctor refuted the
theory of a mask preventing the in-
fluenza, and the campus gave them
up.
Rooming houses were full of stu-
dents ill with the "flu." Landladies
made large orders of food and dis-
tributed it to the various houses in
their neighborhood. Many times,
some reminisce, sick students had
to take care of themselves.
In one fraternity house used as
living quarters for the soldiers, an
ingenious group of privates once
built a fire on the floor, rumor has it,
so they could keep warm, blankets
being at a premium. Fraternities
were generally abused and the govern-
ment later paid damages on them.
These days, a vital contribution
to "Ann Arbor and her praise," are
pleasant in retrospect, Ann Arborites
of that time think, but they are in
agreement in hoping that they never
recur.

.d.

ALL MUSICAL SUPPLIES FOR STUDENTS
Pianos to Rent Repairing of All Musical Instruments
SMvsic H e a

New Location:

203 East Liberty St.
40 Years in Ann Arbor

Phone 6041

Impulse Clause
Loop-H ole For
Zenge Defense
CHICAGO, Oct. 7. - (AP) - The Il-
linois law that an "irresistible im-
pulse" constitutes a defense to a mur-
der charge, may be invoked to defend
Mandeville W. Zenge, charged with
the mutilation slaying of his rival in
love.
The tall taciturn farmer, son of a
respected family at Canton, Mo., goes
on trial Wednesday. The state's
charge is that he abducted Dr.tWal-
ter J. Bauer, after Bauer had mar-
ried Zenge's pretty sweetheart,
brought him to Chicago and per-
formed a crude operation with a pen-
knife.
The state charges that Zenge, who
was a stranger to the scholarly vic-
tim, struck up an acquaintance at
Ann Arbor and stalked Bauer, wait-
ing for a chance to seize him.
Prosecutors said their witnesses
would testify it was Zenge who drove
Bauer, unconscious, to a Chicago fill-
ing station and then fled on the night
of July 31.
But to tell the story of a small-town
love triangle claimed to furnish the
motive for the savage crime they have
only Zenge himself and the girl,
Louise Schaffer, 22, now in "volun-
tary custody."
Zenge's attorneys prepared to ar-
gue before Judge Cornelius Harring-
ton that they should be furnished cer-
tain, documents, along with a copy
of Bauer's dying statement in which
he sobbe(.
"Before God, I never harmed a
woman or girl' in my' life. Why
should anyone want to do this to
me?"

back.
Cornwell's body was taken to the
Jentner Funeral Home, Manchester.
No inquest will be held.
30,000 SEE TIDE
WASHINGTON, Oct. 5. -(P) -Be-
fore 30,000 spectators, largest foot-
ball crowd in recent capital history,
Alabama drove back into the national
football picture with a convincing
39 to 0 triumph over George Wash-
ington university.

IL

OCTOBER
G ARGOYLE
OUT
TOMO RROW
Get that
Year'sSubscription for
50c

II ALARM CLOCKS

I

HMALLE R'S
State at Liberty
Fine Watch and Jewelry. repairing

I

STARTING TODAY
Shows Continuous 1 - 3 - 5 - 7 - 9
Z5c Until Rest
Two of
11O'clock Day

MICHIGAN

N MAJEST IC
W er
Brihtet tar olSceen St~eand Radio
lisP cloSb a t o
grog George Our e
y' t1 a sLy d a Rob
Wei #inGrc
gild id$ end
dy Barrie

EDGAR ALLEN POE'S
"The Raven"
with
BORIS KARLOFF
BELA LUGOSI

I

I

.- l T

Extra

_..

L

in

I W wf p *iA.Im I r -I I I N II / I 0A

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan