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May 16, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-05-16

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THU1SDAY, MAY 16, 1935

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Regeezi's

Homer

Leads

Varsity

In

q>- - - ___

Four Pitcher's
Used As Nine
Wins, 12 To 4
Harry Verbeek Drives In
Four Runs In Debut As
Varsity Right Fielder
By ARTHUR S. SETTLE '
Abandoning their meager diet of
base hits which has starved the runs-
scored column heretofore, the Wol-
verines feasted upon "Old Man" Cog-
gins, Michigan Normal's thrower, for
11 base hits, which mixed with 13
stolen bases, six bases on balls and
seven errors by the poorly-fielding
Normal nine, enabled them to rout
the Hurons, 12 to 4, yesterday at
Ypsilanti.
Harry Verbeek, Earl Meyers, John
Gee, sophomores, and John Regeczi
and George Ford shared the lime-
light in Michigan's second victory
over Michigan Normal, the Wolver-
ines having defeated Normal, 13 to 1,1
here earlier.
Verbeek Stars At Bat
Starting his first game because Vic
Heyliger, regular right fielder, wasn't,
on hand, Verbeek, normally a second
baseman, lined out two hard singles
with two men on base each time to
drive in four runs and earn a place
on the squad which leaves today for
the Purdue and Illinois road games.
Gee, the first of Michigan's four
pitchers, hurled three innings with-

These Four Will Run In Big Ten Meet Here

Varsity Meets
Cleveland Net
Stars Sunday

EasyVictoryAt
Rudness,'Just A Good Fielder,'
Leads Team's Batters With .313

NINE LEAVES FOR PURDUE
Michigan's squad of 15 ballplay-
ers will leave for Lafayette this
afternoon, where they will meet
Purdue tomorrow and Illinois at
Champaign Saturday, in two Big
Ten contests.
out allowing a hit or a walk, and
doubled in the fourth inning to drive
in Michigan's second and third runs.
Earl Meyers, pitching in the first
game of his life, succeeded Gee on
the mound ill the fourth, and pitched
the next three innings, giving up one
unearned run and one hit. He was
wild, walking four men, but managed
to bear down with men on base.
Ford Steals Six Bases
John Regeczi lined a home run
over the center-field fence in the
fifth inning, scoring Paulson ahead
of him. It was one of the hardest
balls ever hit on the Ypsi diamond
and duplicated Regeczi's feat of last
year when he also hit one out of the
park. With three singles for three
times at bat, Ford led the team in
hitting, and ran wild on the bases,
stealing six off the weak-throwing
Maroz.
Michigan's scoring started in the
first inning without the aid of a hit.
Ford walked, took second on a passed
ball, and negotiated the remaining
distance on two steals.
In the fourth, with Paulson and
Regeczi on second as the result of a
single and walk, Verbeek singled,
scoring both runners. Williams was
safe on an error by the shortstop,
Verbeek taking second. Gee then,
surprised everyone, including himself,
with a double to left scoring Verbeek
and Williams.
Regeczi's home added two more in
the next inning. Two hits by Teitel-
baum, and singles by Verbeek and
Williams, aided by an error, three
walks, and three stolen bases, ac-
counted for Michigan's last five tal-
lies in the sixth, seventh and ninth

Four outstanding Negro stars will be seen in action at the Big Ten
track championships May 24-25 here. Jesse Owens, of Ohio State, is
considered the fastest human competing today; Willis Ward, has been
termed a "one-man track team"; Gene Skinner, of Iowa, is another na-
tionally-known sprinter; and Wilson Briggs, another Iowan, has hung
up records in the 440- and 220-yard dashes. Since the development of
Eddie Tolan, IteHart Hubbard, and Ralph Metcalfe, Negro track stars
have come into their own with a vengeance.
STARD TB yART
CARSTENS
NOW that lean, lanky Omaha has alcade, and King Saxon -meetings
made a show of his fields in both which should prove a great deal more
the Kentucky Derby and the Preak- than any other of Omaha's races.
ness it appears that there is none in Ua
the ranks of the three-year-olds UITE as interesting as Omaha's
(with the possible exception of E. R. ' march through the three-year-
Bradley's Black Helen) that will old ranks, and probably much moreI
seriously threaten his claim to the bitterly fought, will be the battle of
championship, and the question be- these older horses to succeed the great
comes: How does Omaha compare Equipose as handicap champion.
with the great three-year-olds of Azucar's victory in the Santa Anita
recent years - Cavalcade, Twenty Handicap places him in the top rank.
Grand, Reigh Count, and Omaha's Cavalcade, although he has not start-
sire himself, Gallant, Fox? ed since last summer, will probably
Of three-year-olds who can go the be in the thick of the fight this year.
distance of most of the big races for Discovery can never be overlooked.
their age, there appear to be few. But many think it is King Saxon
Roman Soldier probably can. Fire- who will defeat all of these. About a
thorn finished well in the Preakness. year ago he was among the claimers.
Black Helen had little difficulty with Now he has victories in 11 out of his
the mile and one-eighth of the Flori- last 12 starts. In the Paumonok
da Derby, in which she defeated Ro- Handicap, opening the New York rac-
man Soldier last winter. But that ing season, he broke the track record
just about exhausts the list. for six furlongs. In the Excelsior
'HERE are many who have high Handicap, run at Jamaica May 4, he
speed for the sprints. Today whip- defeated a top-notch field by ten
spee fo thesprnts Tody wip-lengths easily.
ped Omaha in the Wood Memorial. Perhaps the royal eyes of Cay-
Psychic Bid, Boxthorn, and St. Ber- ehDiscoveryand ua are
nard can rush into early leads and alcade, Discovery, and Azucar ar
hold them for sprint distances. But it going to feel the dust kicked up by
is the big chestnut son of Gallant Fox this colt who, only a year ago, was
who is going to come with a rush in claimed for $1,800 at Churchill
the end, and that rush will probably D _wns._
bring him this year's three-year-old
championship. DODGERS GET EARNSHAW
Even now Omaha is considered CHICAGO, May 15. - () -In a
a certainty to win the Belmont surprise move to trim their roster to
Stakes at a mile and a half early the major league limit of 23 players,
in June. Should he enter the the Chicago White Sox today sold
Withers, run a weep earlier at George Earnshaw, veteran right-
Belmont, he might meet sterner handed pitcher, to Brooklyn, of the
competition, for the distance is National League.
only a mile._
But Omaha's real tests this year
should come from the older horses, JEWELRY and
in races such as the Detroit Challenge HATCH REPAIRING
Cup or the Jockey Club Gold Cup. He
may enter none of these races. If H A L L E R'S Jewelry
he does he will be meeting horses of State at Liberty
the caliber of Discovery, Azucar, Cav"--__ ___ __ ____
- - - - - - - - --77 - - - - -

Powerful Team Made Up
Of Former Collegiate
Tennis Players
Stellar material will be gathered to-
gether from several big colleges of
the East and Middle West to form
the All-Stars from Cleveland which
will meet Michigan's tennis team
Sunday afternoon. The invaders, all
university stars of recent years, hold
more titles now than any other group
Michigan meets on the annual sched-
ule.
The Big Three of eastern impor-
tance, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton,
will be represented at the second,
fourth, and sixth positions, Dick Ing-
lis, who used to play for Harvard, has
since walked off with the Cleveland
championship. To him will fall the
task of defending the No. 2 post for
the Clevelanders.
Hold Many Doubles Titles
Being a member of Yale's Varsity
net team is one of the lesser feats of
Andy Ingraham\ Cleveland's No. 4
player. He now shares with LeRoy
Weir, top notcher of the group, prac-
tically all the doubles titles to be ob-
tained in Ohio, and played with Weir
in the semi-finals of the Inter-City
doubles last year.
Princeton was once the playing
ground of Waid, who will be working
at No. 6 Sunday.
Walter Smigel, Ohio intercollegiate
champion when he was playing for
Case, is the present municipal title-
holder in Cleveland. He will play at
the No. 3 position.
Played At Wooster, Oberlin
Wooster and Oberlin complete the
roll of colleges whose ex-stars will
battle the Wolverines. LeRoy Weir,
ace of the outfit, wore Wooster colors
in his college days, and Ed Howard,
No. 5, was an Oberlin racqueteer
Weir holds the Ohio indoor singles
and doubles titles, and is former Ohio
and .Illinois state champion.
Howard is a doubles star ranked
fourth last year in the Western
doubles standihgs
Detroit Loses,
4-0,As Ruff ing
Bests Sullivan
Joe Sullivan's attempt for a fourth
consecutive victory failed yesterday
when the New York Yankees hit the
young Detroit pitcher hard behind
the six-hit hurling of Charley Ruffing
to take the final game of the series,
4-0.
The Tigers open their first Eastern
invasion in Washington today. Tom-
my Bridges is expected to pitch.
Other results:
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Cleveland 5, Washington 4.
Chicago 5, Philadelphia 0.
Boston-St. Louis, wet grounds.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
New York 4-1, St. Louis 1-4.
Chicago 8-1, Brooklyn 4-3.
Pittsburgh 20, Philadelphia 5.
Only games scheduled.
GIANTS HIT HOMERS
The New York Giants hit at least
one homer per game for 15 straight
games this season.

By KENNETH PARKER
The man who was not supposed to
hit more than a couple of good foul
balls duringthe present Michigan
baseball season was until yesterday
leading his mates with the respectable
average of .313, compiled in ten games
played since the spring training trip.
The man is George Rudness, center
fielder, who is playing his first sea-
son of Varsity ball.
After basketball season finished,
Rudness r ported to Coach Ray Fish-
er for basball while the squad was
yet practicing in Yost Field House.;
Fisher declared Rudness would devel-
op into a good hitter before another
season rolled around although he
didn't expect him to hit well this year.
Rudness stood stiffly at the plate,
swung late, and popped the ball in
the air when he
- did connect. He
l o o k e d hopeless,
and his record on
the spring training
trip bore out the
contention of those
who predicted that
- he would be of lit-
tle help in the at-
tack. Although his
speed of foot made
': "him an excelleni
fielder, he got bul
one hit on the
RUDNESS jaunt, a singk
which drove in a
run against Navy. He was charge
with 14 times at bat.
The wise boys reckoned without
considering that Rudness might util-
ize his speed and portside position at
the plate to beat out infield hits,
though. And that is precisely what
he has been doing. Four of his ten
hits to date have been safe bunts.
Without those four infield hits.
Rudness' average would be below .300.
Rudness had made only one hit un-
til he started on his program of lay-
ing down bunts and legging it out
with a head first slide into the bag.
He quickly added four hits in this
manner in the next three games, in
addition to a clean single. The lat-
ter hit and a safe bunt were made
off the delivery of Hale Swanson, the
Illinois hurler, who shut out the Wolv-
erines, 1 to 0, recently, allowing but
four safeties.
Of late Rudness has not had to de-
pend upon laying down bunts to make
a batting average. He has been meet-
ing the ball on the nose for clean hits,
Workmen Busy As
Field Is Prepared
For Big Ten Meet
Remodeling of Ferry Field in pre-
paration for the Conference track
neet here May 24 and 25 has been be-
;un with the intention of bringing
bwo more eventsdirectly before the
Stands and the crowd. r
A runway and pit for the broad-
jump is being constructed immediate-
ly in front of the stands and arrange-
ments are to be made to hold the shot
put in the east end zone of the grid-
iron. Under the proposed arrange-
ment only the discus and high jump
events will not be staged directly in
front of the stands.
Widespread interest in the meet is
reflected by the announcement that
14 wires to the new press box, now
nearing completion, have already been
ordered for out-of-town newspapers
by local telegraph agencies.
Tickets sales were reported as "op-
timistic" by Harry Tillotson, business
manager, who announced a demand
of 250 tickets on the first day.

mostly into left field. (He still swings
late.) And against Western State
Tuesday he got his first extrabase
hit of the season, driving a double
into left center.
Besides leading in batting Rudness
also has scored the most runs -10.
Batting number two in the lineup,
he has been in a position to score
more often than his mates. But in
order to score you have to get on, and
Rudness, when he hasn't been hitting
them safely, has been watching the
ball closely to draw more than the
ordinary quota of free tickets to first.
CATCHES BALL FROM AIR
Otto Miller, veteran, Brooklyn
Dodger coach, once caught a baseball
dropped from an airplane 450 feet
above the ground.
- rud_____

O

innings.
The box score:
Michigan AB
Ford, 3b..........3
Rudness, cf ......5
Paulson, 2b .......2
Oliver, lb, p......5
Regeczi, if ........4
Teitelbaum, ss . .5
Verbeek, rf ........4
Parker, rf ........1

B
i
i
i
i

R H
2 3
0 0
2 1
0 0
3 1
2 2
1 2
0 0
2 1
0 0
0 0
0 1

0
1
3
0
11
0
2
2
0
8
0
0
0

Williams, c.......5
Butler, p... ......0
Meyers, p .........2
Gee, p ............2

.38 12 11 27

Totals......
M. S.N. C.
Good, cf ........
Johnson, cf ....
Parker, lf .....
Wendt, 3b ......
Worzniak, lb
Wilser, rf ......
Jacimowicz, ss
Devine, 2b ......
Maroz, c.......
Coggin, p......

A
2
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
2
2
10
0
1
0
0
2
0
1
1
1
1
2
9
11

AB R
..4 0
..0 0
..5 1
..4 0
..2 0
..4 1
..5 0
..3 0
..4 1
..4 1

H
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
1

A
3
0
4
0
6
2
1
5
5
1

I

TO PCOAT
SALE
20%
Discount
on all
TOIPCOATS
$14.40 $16*
$18.00

.
.

Totals..
AMichigan .:
M.S"N.C4.

..32 4 4 27
..100 422 201-12
.000 000 121- 4

7
L3
17

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around the Ci

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1111

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