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April 05, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

EA

Trackmen Head West As Fisher Leads Baseball Team

South

'g,

Rate California
Best On Coast;
Hoyt Takes 22
Five Days Of Training At
Los Angeles Will Help
Wolverines
Twenty-two members of Michigan's
track team, Western Conference In-
door and Butler Relays champions,
will leave this afternoon to meet the
University of California, strongest
team on the West coast and rated
this time the strongest in the coun-
try, April 13, at Berkeley.
Based on the past performances
of individual members of both teams,
the meet is expected to be one of the
greatest dual meets of recent years.
Michigan will enter the meet at a
distinct disadvantage because of its
lack of outside training, having had
less than a whole week of weather
suitable for outside work since the
close of the indoor season, while the
Golden Bears have already engaged
in four dual meets. However, with
about five days of hard work sched-
uled upon arrival on the coast and a
workout before leaving this after-
noon, the Wolverines are conceded no
less than an outside chance to upset
the powerful California aggregation.
Michigan's hopes for the meet are
based upon splitting the California
points in the dash events and hurdles
and piling up points in events above
the half-mile, as the Bears hold a
distinct advantage in all weight
events. The Wolverines will hope al-
so for wins in the high jump, broad
jump, and pole vault.
Dash, Hurdles To Be Close
The dash and hurdle events are
expected to be the features of the
meet with George Anderson and Mor-
ris Pollock, California's stars, facing
Willis Ward, Sam Stoller and Fred
Stiles in the dashes, and Tom Moore
and John Wood opposing Ward, Bob
Osgood and Moreau Hunt in the
hurdles.
Anderson, who has run the hundred
in 9.4 seconds, the world record, and
the 220 in 21 seconds flat, will be the
favorite in both events, although all
four of the shorter distance entries
have done 9.6 seconds or better. Stiles,
entered in the 220, has run the dis-
tance in :21.7, while Stoller, the other
Michigan entry, has never tun the
distance in competition.
Inrthe high hurdles Ward, who has
been clocked unofficially at 14.3 sec-
onds, and at 14.5 officially, will meet
Moore and Wood, both of whom have
approached 14.5 seconds this season,
and Bob Osgood, sophomore confer-
ence champion at 70 yards.
California's points are expected to
pile up in all the weight events, and
especially in the shot in which Willis
Ward, the only Wolverine entry, is
conceded only an outside chance of
placing if he does not scratch.
In the javelin the Bears present
two of about five collegiate perform-
ers who have done over 200 feet in
Fitzgerald and Fink, but a throw of
185 feet by either Adam tone or Bob
Kositchek may place in view of the
inconsistent performances of the
Californians. Neither of the Wolver-
ines has yet been allowed to open up
because of the cold weather.
California Conceded Discus
In the discus the best Michigan
can hope for is a second, on a throw
of about 145 feet by Skip Etchells,
with Randell of California conceded
first on the basis of throws consistent-
ly above that mark..
Captain Harvey Smith and Clayton
Brelsord in the mile, with Howard
Davidson in the half, and Neree Alix,
Walter Stone and od Howell are ex-
pected to pile up points against rela-
tively weak opposition from the Bears.
Smith will double in the mile and

half mile.
In the high jump Willis Ward, if
returned to his best form, will be a
favorite to win, while Konrad Mois-
io will be given a chance to place. In
the broad jump Ward and Stoller
have each done better than the errat-
ic showings of Mushy Pollock, the
Bears' best entry.
The complete squad is composed
of Captain Smith, Willis Ward, Sam
SMoller, Fred Stiles, Stan Birleson,
Harvey Patton, Frank Aikens, Howard
Davidson, Clayton Brelsford, Harry
O'Connell, Neree Alix, Walter Stone,
Rod Howell, Konrad Moisio, Dave
Hunn, Moreau Hunt, Bob Osgood,
Adam Stone, Bob Kositchek, Skip
Etchells, Mike Savage, and Paul Gor-
man.

Renew Rivalry In National A. A. U. Meet

I

-associated Press Photo.
Jack Medica (left) of the University of Washington, and Jimmy Gil-
hula, Detroit swimmer attending Southern California, are expected to
furnish a great part of the thrills in the National A.A.U. senior indoor
championships this weekend in New York. They will renew the rivalry
which resulted in two new world'records and a new intercollegiate mark
in the National Collegiate meet last Friday and Saturday. Medica won
three times, but his margin of victory was less than a foot in the 220- and
440-yard free-style events.
STARD'UST ARTE
CARSTENS

Varsity Opens
Season Against
Marshall Nine
Fisher Names Patchin To:
Pitch First Of 9 Spring
TrainingGames
HUNTINGTON, W. Va., April 4. --
(Special) - The University of Mich-
igan baseball squad will arrive here
tomorrow morning to open its nine-
game Southerngtraining tour against
Marshall' College.
Leaving Ann Arbor at 1:30 p.m.
today, the Wolverines plannedtol
stop over just outside of Columbus,
0., and negotiate the remaining 100
miles in the morning.
Marshall College, baseball champ-
ions of the Buckeye Conference last
year, has a veteran team back, and
will probably offer the Wolverines
the most strenuous opposition they
will encounter on their Southern
swing, with the exception of Duke
University.I
Herd Shows Batting Power
In the opening game at League
Park last Sunday, Marshall showed
olenty of hitting power to take an
easy victory over Morris Harvey Col-
lege.
Coach Ray Fisher has named Art
Patchin, three-year veteran, to take
the mound against the Herd tomor-
row. The stocky right-hander will
go the whole route if he feels good,
but in the event that he weakens or
tires, Lanky George Butler or Long
John Gee, sophomores, will relieve
him.
Doc Kincaid, captain and ace right-
hander of the Herd's hurling staff,
will start for Marshall, according to
Coach Hawley. Lefty Portis, an able
southpaw, will be held in reserve.
With a right-hander in the box,
Coach Fisher will start Joe Lerner, a
portside swinger, in right field, plan-
ning to use Vic Heyliger against left-
handed throwing.
Williams Only Sophomore
Kim Williams, catcher, will be the
only sophomore in the veteran Mich-
igan line-up. He is a hard hitter,
and has improved vastly in the mech-
anics of backstopping.
The Michigan line-up and batting
order for the opener: George Ford,
third base, Joe Lerner, right field,
George Rudness, center field, Clayt
Paulson, second base, Captain Russ
Oliver, first base, John Regeczi, left
field, Jack Teitelbaum, shortstop,
Lyle "Kim" Williams, catcher, and
Art Patchin, pitcher.
The Wolverines will leave for Sa-
em, Va., after the game, a jump of
more than one hundred miles, where
they meet Roanoke College, Saturday.
Berger Larson, Michigan's best curve
ball pitcher, will draw the starting
hurling assignment.
CALL FROSH BALL PLAYERS
Bennie Oosterbaan, freshman
baseball coach, has issued a call
for the freshman baseball team
to report Monday afternoon, April
15, on the freshman diamond in
Ferry Field
Friday and Saturday
SPECIALS

In1tramura nl Bas ketbal
Honor Jeams Chosen
The Intramural department an-
nounced the all-star fraternity
and independent basketball teams,
which were selected by the ref-
erees who officiated the games,
yesterday.
Mike Savag, center for the
Physical Ed's who won the inde-
pendent title, was selected for the
pivot position for the third con-
secutive time. Milt Eskowitz, who
led the Alpha Omega five to the
"A" crown, was picked as one of
the forwards. Last year he won
the same position in the indepen-
dent section.
Other members of the fraternity
team are: Howdie Levine, Kappa
1u, forward: Phil MuCollum, Beta
Theta Pi, center; Don Nichols, Chi
Psi, guard; and Jack Palmer, Chi
Psi, guard. The independent se-
lections include: Robert Fleetwood,
Cast Off's. forward, Wilcox, D.D.'s,
guard; Vincent Pope, Physical
Ed's, guard; Mummery, Blue
Raiders, guard.

Crippled by the loss, at least temp-t
orarily, of one of their stars, the
WVolverine tennis players, under the
tutelage of Coach John Johnstone,
are practicing every afternoon on the
Ferry Field Courts.
Howie Kahn, veteran and one of the
most promising of the 1935 team, is
suffering from a strained leg muscle.
A fall last week has kept him off the
courts ever since, and the doctor has
ordered that he stay out of practice
until after spring vacation.
Vacation will not interfere with
practice for most of the members of
the squad. Conveniently, several of
them are neighbors, and will be able
to keep in trim until the ranking
matches, immediately after vacation.
Johnny Rodriquez and Miller Sher-
wood will have a chance to practice

together. Ted Townsend will be in
Cleveland, playing with his father,
former Michigan captain, and other
members of the Tennis and Racquet
Club.

The New MAY
Ophthalmoscope
with DOUBLE LIGHT.
Is worth Investigation
before buying any other.
Did you see our
PANDORA BAG

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at

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Ri'i:/.

I

I-M WILL REMAIN OPEN
The Intramural Building will be
open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. every
day but Sunday during spring va-
cation. The swimming pool will
be open from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

THE QUARRY, INC.
Corner South State and
North University

<__.._.

__.___

This simile appearing
yet amazng a rbent
filter invention with
Cellophanoexterior
interior keeps juices
and flakes in Fiter and
out of mouth.
Preventstonguebe
IA9nT rawnouth,wetheeL
ezpectoration. N®
ICreaking in. -
tat sad
B u y S O n m p n o f

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A CORRECTION. .
Contrary to our previous
announcement, we will not
be open during vacation.
We take pleasure in an-
nouncing that we will re-
open Sunday, April 16, at
12:30 p.m. in new quarters
720 FOREST AVENUE
CONTINENTAL
DINING 'RIOOMS
120SuhU -BtenCuch n oet- il231

!Injury Of Kahn Temporarily
Weakens Varsity Net Team.

THE FOLLOWING contribution was
sent in by Bob St. Clair, a former
member of the sport staff who hasn't
lost his interest in athletics. No
more comment is necessary:
To the Editor:
The last few years have witnessed
a marked falling off in the number
of minor baseball leagues in existence.
As a result of this the available
supply of diamond talent for the big
league teams to sift and comb through
with the hope of unearthing future
Ruths and Cobbs has been sadly de-
pleted. Couple with this the fact
that the youth of the land has been
exhibiting a growing interest in the
fine points of such games as golf and

by the name of "Slicker".Parks was
deemed worthy of a trial with De-
troit, and though he did not quite
measure up, he later enjoyed consid-
erable success in the American Asso-
ciation.
Between 1929 and 1924 three Mich-
igan men -Ernie Vick, Jack Blott,
and Bob Knode - attracted enough
attention through their prowess in
collegiate circles to make the long
jump upward. A singular fact with
respect to Vick and Blott was in their
both being catchers and both being
chosen All-American by the late Wal-
ter Camp.
DURING the course of the next five

Available in Ann Arbor
at
MILLER
DRUG STORE
North U at Thayer
PHONE 9797

tennis to the exclusion of the dia er oefu fRyFse'
L~Ifli L LL~ X~i~iL1 I ~i~Ua- years some four of Ray Fisher's
mond sport and the situation con-
fronting the major leagues has taken hurlers-Pete Appleton (known to
on serious proportions. Michigan fans as Jablanowski) Don
* * * Miller, Fred Asbeck, and Bill Mac-
IN AN EFFORT to alleviate the con- Afee - found favor with major league
dition they have turned more and clubs. Both Appleton and MacAfee
more to the colleges of the country proved moderately successful. The
for material, as a glance at spring former is still hurling in the Interna-
training rosters will show. Today tional League, while the latter volun-
some of the most shining luminaries tarily retired this year. Since then,
in the game - men like "Columbia "Red" Corriden, Sol Hudson, and,
Lou" Gehrig, Mickey Cochrane, Frank more recently, Whitey Wistert and
Frisch and Bill Weber are examples Ted Petoskey haye realized every
of the fact that the attention de- baseball player's dream - a tryout in'
voted to college baseball teams is fully the majors. No other Big Ten school,
warranted. not even our arch-foe, Illinois, can
In this respect it is interesting to rival this record that we have com-
note that Mic.higan has not exactly piled over a 20-year period under four
been a wall-flower. coaches: Branch Rickey, Carl Lund-
*ngren, Del Pratt and Ray Fisher, all
ONE OF THE MOST brilliant play- big leaguers in their day. To my mind
ers ever to grace a major league it is just another proof that Michigan
field, George Sisler, whose career was athletic heritage has not been founded
unfortunately abbreviated by sinus entirely on the production of great
trouble, in 1913 and 1914 did a mas- football teams.- d
terful job of 'pitching for the Wol- -Student.
verines. Under the guiding hand of --
Branch Rickey, then Michigan coach,
both Sisler and his battery mate, 100 ENGRAVED CARDS
"Pud" Rogers, together with Short AND PLATE FOR ONLY $1.50
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hitting ability (.421 in 1921). AOur Location Saves You Money.
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The Austin .....$2.25
TRENCH COATS $2.95
WOOL SLACKS
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SANFORIZED SHIRTS
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COOPER'S HOSE
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THE TOPCOATS
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MAGIC CHEF TABLE TOP
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$20.00 Old-Stove Allowance
$56.50 Plus Tax Installed

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