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March 31, 1935 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-03-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

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Church Groups
elect Sub jects
For Discussion
Prof. Slosson To Speak At
C ngregationaI Student
FellowshipMeeting
Very pertinent to modern student
life are the subjects announced by
the different church student groups
for their weekly meetings tonight."
"ShouldStudents Strike?" is he sub-
ject upon which Prof. Preston W.
Slosson of the history department will
lead a discussion at the meeting of
the Congregational fellowship to-
night. The program will follow a
supper to be held at 6 p.m.
Dean Alice Lloyd has been an-
nounced as the leader of the dis-
cussion on "The Use of Leisure Time"
at the meeting of the Presbyterian
Student Forum at 6:30 p.m. A social
hour and supper will precede the dis-
cussion.
Sacks to Lead Meeting
At the open forum to be held at
8 p.m. at the Hillel Foundation "The
Scientific Attitude in Social Prob-
lems" will be under consideration.
Dr. Jacob Sacks of the pharma-
cology department is to lead the
meeting.
The Rev. Alfred Lee Klaer will be
the speaker at the Wesleyan Guild
Devotional service at 6 p.m. at Stalk-
er Hall, his subject being "What Is
the Role of Christian Youth?" The
program will be followed by a fel-
lowship supper. The Young People's
Fellowship of St. Andrews Episcopal
Church will meet at 5 p.m. at Harris
Hall to hear the Rev. Henry Lewis,
Who will lead a discussion upon the
subject "Why I Believe In God."
To Hold Musical Program
The Disciples Guild of the Churc
of Christ has made plans for a
musical program with "Worship in
Song and Story" for its theme, to
be held after a social hour and tea.
The members of the Roger Wyilliams
Guild of the First Baptist Church
Will meet at the Guild House at 12
oon today to hear an address by
Pkb, Aayirond oekstra f the DWI-
bsbphy deprtmnent on "Religion and
V'alues."
At the Liberal Students' Union
which wilbe held at 7:30 p.M. today
there will be a discussion of the
speakers of the month.
St. Paul's Lutheran Student Wal-
ther League will meet at 5:30 p.m.
tonight for a supper and a fellowship
hour. The student fellowship of the
Zion utheran Church will meet at
5:30 p.. for studet fellowship and
supper to be followed at 6:30 p.m. by
a student forum with an address by
the Rev. H. O.'Yoder on "Testing
for Values."
Rayons And Silks
In Darker Shades
Used ForLingerie
Rayon is staging a comeback this
spring-and With a vengeance. Nc
longer is rayon the old-fashioned
-chain-stitched -material we used to
knw, which stretched and shrank
alternately, and never managed to
look really nice.
The manufacturers haven't been
idle, and they have perfected new
types which are not only much bet-
ter than the old rayon, but which
are superior even to silk in some
ways. These rayons are more closely
woven, and are guaranteed to hold
their shape even with the roughest
kind of treatment. They launder
easily, and don't have to be ironed at

all, news which should be a pleasant
surprise to the over-worked college
woman.
Rayon Popular For Slips
You have to look very closely tc
see that these bembergs and suede-
skins, new names patented by the
manufacturers, are really rayons
They are especially popular in slips
this time of the year, because they
fit so much better under knits and
boucles than crepe and satin slips
They are also being shown in paja-
mas, in good-looking tailored styles;
and, of course, rayon panties, called
"briefs" are most comfortable and
practical for summer wear.
One of the interesting and most
daring fashion notes in spring lin=
genie is the use of dark colrs, espe-
cially navy, in foundation garments.
We never heard of this before, and
we don't know how poular they will
be, but they should be, very nice
for wear under your spring clothes.
The idea seems to be to harmonize
your girdles with your dress. You
can get these girdles in brown, yel-
low, green and white, too.
New Fabric's For ingerie
Not only new colors but new fab-
rics have revolutionized the corset
world this spring. Silk soiree is the
newest material being used. It resein-
bles a silk batiste, but has a much
thinner texture. It is extremely firm
And is therefore a good corset fabric
Net and linen are being used fre-
quently in the new foundation gar-
ments, too.

Little Symphony To
Give Ten Concerts
In North Carolina
During the sprilg holidays, the{
University of M4ichigan Little Syim-
phony, which has recently been or-
ganized on this campus, will make an
cxtensive cohcert tour through North
Carolina, playing a total of 18 con-
certs.
The Symphony consists of 16 mem-
bers of the faculty and students of
the School of Music. This tour will
.include appearances at Duke Univer-
sity, University of NorthCarolina,
Guilfor'd College, Davidson College,
Elon College, Salem College, Agricul-
tural and Technical College, Win-
ston-Salem Teachers College, Cataw-
ba College, Palmer Memorial Insti-
tute, and in several of the leading
music centers of the State.
This tour is the first to be con-
ducted from the School of Music
on such an extensive scale and at so
great a dis ance. Two concerts will
be broadcast over stations WSJS and
WBT on Thursday and Friday eve-
nings, April 11 and 12.
The creation of a little symphony'
was "conceived froni the desire to
train a select group of young musi-

Vembers Of University Little Symphony Orchestra

Freshman Glee
Club Will Give
Concert Today
The Freshman Girls' Glee Club
wvill make its first appearance to-'
Jay at the Jordan Hall musicale.
This organization has been holding
weekly meetings throughout the win-
ter under the direction of Maretta
Martinek, '35, and it affords training
in group singing for those intersted
in Stanley Chorus work next year.
The program to be presented today
includes: "Twenty. Eighteen," an
English folksong: "In These Delight-
ful Pleasant Groves" by Purcell; "The
Merry Dance" by Molloy and Lynes;
Clokey's "Flower of Dreams"; and old
German "Minnelied"; Scott's "Lul-
laby"; and "Wake Thee, Now, Dear-
est," a Czecho-Slovak folksong. Em-
ma Mary Foote will accompany the
Glee Club.
The following officers have been
elected and have been managing the
club: Shirl Crosman, '32, president;
Adeline Singleton, '38, vice-president;
Mary Garvin, '38, secretary and treas-
surer; and Margaret Curry, '38, li-
brarian.

Mortarboard Holds
Initiation Service
Mortarboard, honorary senior so-
ciety, will hold its annual initiation
services at 8 a.m. today. Breakfast
will follow in the League Grill. Mary
Sabin, '35, president of Mortarboard
is to lead the ceremony.
The seven initiates, all juniors, who
were tapped last Monday at the ,In-
stallation Banquet, are Jane Arnold,
Grace Bartling, Winifred Bell, Dor-
othy Gies, Margaret Hiscock, Julie
Kane and Jean Seeley.
FINAL MEETING PLANNED
The international relations depart-
ment of the Woman's club of Ann
Arbor will hold the final meeting of
the Marathon round table series Wed-
nesday.
FRENCH Fashions
All'the latest styles of
French Fashions available
MA Y at
MARY HUTZEULS
Maker- Gowns, Tailored Suits, Coats;
Phone 3468 zO6 E. Liberty

Reading from left to right: Harry Siegel, Charles McNeill, Romine Hamilton, John Mosajgo, Ruby
Peinert, Ruth Pfohl, Charles Bilbert, Vlasta Podoba, John Krell, Bernard Hirsch, Raymond Kondratowicz,
Maretta Martinek, Frederiek Baessler, Thor Johnson, conductor, Everett Kisinger, and Raymond Fink. The
Little Symphony will make a concert tour of North Carolira during spring vacation.

cians toward professional calibre.
Members of the School of Music fac-
ulty have assisted in preparation of
the musical programs for the tour.
A capable roster of soloists has been
arranged and selected from the mem-
bers of the little symphony. Ruth
Pfohl, Spec. SM, will be harp solo-
ists with the orchestra. Other solb-
ists are Romine Hamilton, '36SM,
violinist, Ruby 'Peinert, Spec. SM,
violo-ncellist, Raymond Kondratow-

icz, '35SM, pianist, Viasta Podoba,I
'36SM, bassoonist, Charles Gilbert,!
'37SM, oboist, John Krall,'37SM, flut-
est, and Maretta Martinek, '35SM,
contrabassist. The entire concert
tour will be under the direction of
Thor Johson, Grad. SM.
Aside from formal appearances of
the Little Symphony in North Caro-
lina, a number of matinee concerts7
Nave been prepared especially for:+
young people and will be given in

several of the cities the symphony vis-'
its. During the past two months, the
little symphony has been rehearsing
intensively in preparation for this
tour.
The repertoire of this organization
for this concert tour includes works
of a varied nature. Compositions of
Strauss, M o z a r t, Tschaikowsky,
S a i n t-Saens, Debussy, Schubert,
Chopin, Rinsky-Korsakov, and Ibert
will be played during the tour.

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