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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 07, 1935 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-03-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURsDAY,WMAR

DAILY OFFICI
PublioatIon in the Bulletin !s constr
UnItraity, Copy recelve at the offi
unl 3:30; 11:30 a.m. Saturday.
THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1935 1
VOL. XLV No. 113
Notices
Procedure in Case of Articles Stol-
en.; or, .Missi ss:
Notice should be given at the Busi-
ness Office, Room 3, University Hall,
with the utmost promptness whenever
any articles, whether owned private-
ly or by the institution, disappears
under circumstances which indicate
theft.
Shirley W. Smith
Notige To Al Members of the Uni-
versity:, The following is an extract
of a By-Law of the Regents (Chap-
ter III-B, Sections 8 and 9) which
has been in effect since September,
1926:-
"It will hereafter be regarded as
contrary to University policy for any
one to have in his or her possession
any key to University buildings or
parts of buildings if such key is not
s.tamped as provided (i.e. by the
Buildings and Grounds Department).
If such unauthorized keys are found
the case shall be referred to the Dean
or the proper head of the University
division involved for his action in
accordance with this principle. Any
watchman or other proper represen-
tative of the Buildings and Grounds
Department, or any Dean depart-
ment head or other proper University
official shall have the right to in-
spect keys believed to open Univer-
sity buildings, at any reasonable time
or place.
...For any individual to order,
have made, or permit to be ordered
or made, any duplicate of his or her
University key, through unauthorized
channels, must be regarded as a spe-
cial and willful disregard of the safe-
ty of University property."
These regulations are called to the
attention of all concerned, for their
information and guidance. Any per-
son having any key or keys to Univer-
sity buildings, doors, or other locks,
contrary to the provisions recited
above, should promptly surrender the
same to the Key Clerk at the office of
the Superintendent of Buildings and
Grounds.
Shirley W. Smith.
Smokin in University Buildings:
Attention is called to the general rule
that smoking is prohibited in Univer-
sity buildings except in private of-
fices and assigned smoking rooms
where precautions can be taken and
control exercised. This is neither a
mere arbitrary regulation nor an at-
tempt to meddle with anyone's per-
sonal habits. It is established and
enforced solely with the purpose of
preventing fires. During the past two
years there have been twenty fires
in University buildings, seven of
which were attributed to cigarettes.
To be effective, the rule must neces-
sarily apply to bringing lighted to-
bacco into or through University
buildings - including such lighting
just previous to going outdoors. With-
in the last few years a serious fire
was started at the exit from the
Pharmacology Building by the throw-
ing of a still lighted match into re-
fuse waiting removal at the doorway.
If the rule is to be enforced at all its
enforcement must begin at the build-
ing entrance. Further, it is impos-
sible that the rule should be enforced
with one class of persons if another
,lass of persons disregards it. It is a
disagreeable and thankless task to
enforce" almost any rule. This rule
against the use of tobacco within the
buildings is perhaps the most thank-
less and difficult of all, unless it has
the willing support of everyone con-
cerned. An appeal is made to all per-
sons using the University buildings --

staff members, student and other -
to contribute individual cooperation
to this effort to protect University
buildings against fires.
This statement is inserted at the
request of the Conference of Deans.
UniversitycScholarships in theI
Graduate School:
The Board of Regents of the Uni-
versity of Michigan have established
certain University of Michigan Schol-
arships to be known as University
Scholarships in the Graduate School
and have directed that these Schol-
arships shall be available to students
in the University who are residents
of the State of Michigan and who en-.
ter upon graduate work in the aca-
demic year immediately following

[AL BULLETIN
uctve notice to all members of the
ce of the Assistant to the President
their undergraduate curricula and the
receiving of the bachelor's degree.
The Scholarships carry exemption
from fees in the menner of existing
University Fellowships in the Gradu-
ate School. Application blanks for
University Scholarships in the Gradu-
ate School may be obtained from the
office of the Graduate School and
should be filed not later than March
9, accompanied by a transcript of the
undergraduate record.
C: S. Yoakum, Dean
College of Literature, Science and
the Arts, School of Music, and School
of Education: All students, now in
residence, who received marks of In-
complete or X at the close of their
last term of attendance, must com-
plete work in such courses by the end
of the first month of the present se-
mester, March 11. Where illness or
o t h e r unavoidable circumstances
make this impossible, a limited exten-
sion of time may be granted by the
Administrative Board of the Literary
College, the Administrative Commit-
tee of the School of Education, or the
Director of the School of Music, pro-
vided a written request, with the ap-
proval and signature of the instructor
concerned is presented at the Regis-
trar's Office, Room 4, University Hall.
In cases where no supplementary
grade is received and no request for
additional time has been filed, these
marks shall be considered as having
lapsed into E grades.
The Bureau of Appointments has
received several calls from summer
camps desiring Junior, Senior Medi-
cal students or internes, both men
and women. If interested call at the
Bureau of Appointments at once.
Bureau of Appointments,I
201 Mason Hall
Aeronautical Engineers' Division
A. S. M. E.: Please sign up for the
Stinson Aircraft Plant inspection trip
scheduled for Saturday, March 9, on
the bulletin board in the Aero Eng.
Dept. in East Eng. Bldg., before
Thursday night. Further details will
be listed there. Transportation will
be provided for those in the order of
their signing.
1935 Mechanical Engineers: P. W.
Boynton of the Socony-Vacuum Oil
Company will be in Room 221 West
Engineering Building the afternoon
of March 11, for the purpose of in-
terviewing those men who may be in-
terested in employment with this
company. Will you please make an
appointment prior to March 11.
University Oratorical Contest: Stu-
dents who are preparing to enter
this contest are urged to consult with
any member of the department of
Speech and General Linguistics re-
garding the composition of the speech.
It is hoped that all contestants will
arrange consultations within the next
few days.
Petitions for Assembly Offices and
positions on Standing Committees,
Membership, Activities, and Bulle-
tins, are to be filed in Undergraduate
Office of League, March 7, 8, and 9.
Contemporary: All manuscripts
submitted for the December and Feb-
ruary issues not called for by Satur-
day, March 16, will be destroyed.
"Unfinished Picture" - Tickets for
the Hillel Play to be presented in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, March
15 and 16, are now on sale at Wahr's,
Slater's and Ulrich's book stores.
University Broadcasting:

9:15-9:45 a.m.-Laboratory Pro-
gram for University Speech Class.
Scenes from "Doctor Knock."
2:00-2:30 p.m. - Spanish Language
Series - Topic: "New Tendencies in
Spanish American Literature" (In
English), Julio del Toro, Assistant
Professor of Spanish.
10:00-10:15 p.m.-"The School
and Unemployed Youth," James B.
Edmonson, Professor of Education
and Dean of the School of Education.
10:15-10:30 p.m.-"Wood Tech-
nology and the Police - The Impor-
tance of the Wood Expert in Prose-
cuting the Criminal," William Ky-
noch, Associate Professor of Wood
Technology.
Academic Notices
Political Science 1: Make-up ex-

li,

TH E STAG E

0

Classified Directory

i' I

AT THE LYDIA MENDELSSONN
"DR. KNOCK"
A REVIEW]
The redeeming feature of "Dr.
Knock" is the suave performance ofa
every member of the cast, for with-
out the exertion of every iota of act-
ing ability possible, the stage at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre would be
devoid of any dramatic interest for
an American audience.
Play Production has shown bad
judgment in choosing to produce such
a play as " Dr. Knock," because, al-
though it affords excellent material
for the laboratory of a dramatic
school, its uneventful, slow-moving,
pepless plot is neither entertaining,
comment-provoking, nor does it pos-
sess any of the attributes which are
necessary to satisfy the type of au-
dience which it makes a bid for.
Dr. Knock, himself, is an oppor-
tunist whose medical practice is used
amination for first semester, 1934-
35, Saturday morning, March 9, at
9 o'clock, Room 2029 A.H.
Schedule of Ph.D. Examinations
in the Department of English Lan-
guage and Literature for Spring,
1934-35:
April 20 - American Literature.
April 27 - Nineteenth Century
May 4-Eighteenth Century.
May 11- Renaissance.
May 18 - Criticism.
May 25 - Mediaeval
June 1 - Linguistics
Students who intend to take these
examinations should register in the
English Office.
Geology 12: Quiz sections will not
meet Friday.
Exhibitions
Modern Trends in Textile Design
are shown by a collection of fabrics
circulated by the College Art Asso-
ciation, now on exhibition in the
ground floor corridor of the Archi-
tectural Building. Open daily, 9 to
6, excepting Sunday. The public is
cordially invited.
Events Today
Zoology Seminar: Miss Hsu will re-
port on "The Life History of a Prono-
cephalid Monostome" and Mr. Mill-
er on "A Limnological Study of Pel-
matohydra With Special Reference
To Their Quantitative Seasonal Dis-
tribution," at 7:30 p.m. in Room 2116
N.S.-
Observatory Journal Club meets at'
4:15 in Observatory lecture room. Dr.
Dean B. McLaughlin will review "A
Study of the Spectra of Eclipsing
Binaries" by Arthur B. Wyse. Tea
will be served at 4:00.
Transportation Club: Meeting at 8
p.m., Michigan Union. Prof. . L.
Sharfman will speak on "The Current
Railroad Problem." All interested
are invited to attend.
Senior Engineering Studsents: There
will be a meeting of senior- engineers,
in Room 348, West Engineering
Building, at 10 a.m. All seniors will
be excused from classes at that hour.
Quarterdeck: Regular meeting at
the Union, 7:30. George D. Hertner
will speak on "Skin Friction Research
in the U. of M. Naval Tank" and M.
M. Earle will give a description of the
new vessels "Queen Mary" and "Nor-
mandie."
Hindustan Club, meeting at 8 p.m.,
Lane Hall. Mr. Kadri will review the
present situation in India. All are
invited.
Graduate Luncheon for Chemical
Engineers, Room 3201 E. Eng. Bldg.
Dr. Rajidolph Adams, Director of the
Clements Library, will address the
group.

Former Jordan Residents are all
cordially invited to tea at Jordan
Hall from 4 until 5:30.
Hillel Foundation: At 8 p.m. Dr.

solely as a means to make himself
rich. He takes hold of a provincial
French community which, when he
first appears, is remarkably healthy.
Within a surprisingly short time he
has most of the citizenry in bed be-
lieving that they are at death's very
door. He manages to keep them all
satisfied to be so and to watch him
become the hero of the community.I
The author, Jules Romains, has in-
cluded a substantial amount of clever
satire on the medical profession as
a whole, and "Dr. Knock" is unde-
niably full of continental wit, but just
as the Englishman is last to get the
American joke, the Amnerican misses
the boat (if there is a boat to miss)
on this type of French comedy.
However, this is not the result of
poor execution. Praise is due everyone
concerned with it, the directors, the
creators of the sets, the costumer,
and above all the performers them-
selves. Charles Harrell, as Dr. Knock,
turns in the best of the good work
he has done all year; Madame Pons,
played by Sarah Pierce, is, as areI
most of her characterizations, deft
and delightful; Frank Funk, as Mon-
sieur Mousquet, again displays his
versatility and potentialities; and al-
though his role is somewhat nonde-
script, Halan Bloomer's portrayal is
commendable. "Dr. Knock" is, in

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertiseennts with Classified
Advertising Dpartmient. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previov ; to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance Ile per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
1Oc per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephone rate -15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
14c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion,
By contract, per line - 2 lines daily, one
month...........................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months..........3c
2 lines daily, college year ........7c
4 lines E.'.D., college year........7c
100 lines used as desired..........9C
300 lines used as desired..........8c
1,000 lines used as desired ........7
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The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c r line do above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per lineuto above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 71 point
ktype.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Beautiful, large room it
private home, for one or two women.
605 Oxford Road. Phone 8510. 140

WANTED
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main . 7x
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price, 4x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
9x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Purse, navy blue, crocheted:
Tuesday night on Forest between
South U. and Hill. Reward. Call
2-1364. 141
LOST: In 5006 Angel Hall Parker Va-
cuumatic pen with initials C.L.G.
Return to Elaine Goldberg, 820 Hill.
Liberal Reward. Phone 8907.
142
NOTICE
. STUDENTS wanted with selling abil-
ity. Steady employment, good wages.
Apply Sam Ellis, 200 N. Main St.
7x
RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY SHOP,
1115 S. University. Special Monday
and Tuesday, shampoo and finger
wave, 35c. Rest of week, 5c. Per-
manents $3- $6, end permanents,
$2. Phone 7561. 12x
NEW AND USED CARS - Largest
selection in the country. Associated
Motor Services, Inc. 317-W. Huron.
Ph. 2-3268. "Let's get acquainted,"
lox
[tuyskens Endorses
Conhn For Mayor
Prof. John H. Muyskens of the
speech department, heartily endorsed
John Conlin, local attorney who beat
him in the primary Monday in the
race for the Democratic mayoralty
niomination.
"We Democrats must stick to-
gether," Professor Muyskens said.
"Conlin is an excellent man and has
my fullest support."

I

short, a difficult job done well.- I
-C.B.C. Award For Essay
Raphael Isaacs will conduct his class Is European Trip,
on the "Jew in Science," at the Foun-
dation. Everyone s cordially invited The Bureau of University Travel,
to attend. Newton, Mass., is offering a Vacation
An open tea at the Foundation this Cruise of France, Spain, and Italy as
afternoon from 4 to 6, sponsored by a prize to the student who presents
the Phi Beta Delta fraternity, every- the best study of the Educational
one is cordially invited to attend. Values in Travel, according to Prof.
ene Talamon of the French Depart-
Conring Events ! . x.
The study shall be based upon per-
English Journal Club: The regular -onal experience, together with an ex-
meeting will be held Friday, March 8, pression of the writer's own personal
in the League. Business meeting at desires in travel.
4 p.m. Program open to the public All applications must be presented
at 4:15 p.m. Subject: Modern Trends to the Bureau of University Travel on
in Biography. The discussion is in or before March 15, 1935.

charge of Mr. Modder, Mr. Procter,
Mr. Hart, and Miss Pollard. The
public is cordially invited.
Cosmopolitan Club: Social meeting
on Saturday, March 9, 8 p.m., Lane
Hall. A cordial invitation is ex-
tended to all students.
Graduate Students: All graduate
students, whether they have previous-
ly gone on trips of the Graduate Out-
ing Club or not, are invited to attend
the annual banquet of the club at the
Washington Scout Cabin on Satur-
day. A steak dinner will be served
for 30 cents and there will be a special
program. This is a good opportunity
to learn about the club and its activi-
ties. The group will meet at Lane
Hall at 3:00 and hike out to the cabin
which is at the entrance to the Hur-
on River Drive..
ATTENDS CONFERENCE
Mrs. Julio del Toro, 1120 Hill St.,
is in Detroit today to attend a con-
ference of the triennial board as
chairman of finance, to plan for the
triennial meeting of the General Fed-
eration of Women's Clubs to be held
in Detroit, June 4 to 12.
MAJ ESTIC
Matin J.* 3c -Evenuings -,40c
TODAY and TOMORROW
TWO FEATURES - an intiguing,
mixture of adventure and comedy.
GEORGE RAFT j
"LIMEHOUSE BLUES"
with ANNA MAY WONG
and JEAN PARKER
Showing at 2 - 4:46 - 7:12 - 9:58
also
CHARLES BUTTERWORTH
Laugh Star of "Forsaking All Others"
JIMMY DURANTE
"STUDENT TOUR"
Showing at 3:20 - 8:20
LATEST METRO NEWS

For application blanks and further
particulars students are requested to
apply to Professor Merlino or Pro-
fessor Talamon of the romance lan-
guages department.
RADIO
i SERVfI
$1.00 I&

$1.00
STO FF L E T
523 East Liberty
Phone 8116

d

U

O NE American newspaper is
so highly regarded by educators
for its editorial analysis of public
questions and its accurate, com-
prehensive coverage of the whole
field of world news that its con-
tent is used as text material in
many university classrooms.
The
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
is outstanding in American jour-
nalism for its virile, militant and
liberal public service ideals.

I
V
i
I
',
. ; i,;
II
ii IJ

Saturday

PI

f

DO YOUR KIDN EYS LOOK LIKE CIN DERS?
SSE
DOCTOR KNOCK
A Hilarious.Farce
PLAY PRODUCTION'S NEWEST HIT
March 7 -98p-9

DAILY 1Sc to 6 P.M.
WH I TN EY
Now
Binnie Barnes
Frank Morgan
in Ursulla Parrott's
S"There's
Always
Tomorrow"
and
JOE E. BROWN

Make
Your ates
Now

Subscriptions may be placed with Mr. Wesley H.
Maurer, Department of Journalism. This arrangement
is for the convenience of faculy members and stw-
dents, and is without personal profit to Mr. Maurer.
NIGHTS 40c DOUBLE FEATUR
MATINEES 30c r A r.n

SINISTER MYSTERYsAVo
~ IN EVERY SHADOW
CRIME
First-Run
Features
PASSION

"Six-Day
.,.. . . ,

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