100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 06, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

6, 1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Two Games

Open

Western

Conference Grid Season

.n

Wildcats Face
Iowa; Hoosiers
Meet Buckeyes
Other Big Ten Teams To
Oppose Non-Conference
Foes; Irish Play Opener
CHICAGO, Oct. 5. - P) - While
Notre Dame opens what Irish alumni,
both real and synthetic, hope will be
another golden football era, the West-
ern Conference will let loose with two
major blasts Saturday:
Notre Dame will open its first sea-
son under Coach Elmer Layden
against the University of Texas Long-
horns. Iowa, rated as one of the
top bracket elevens in the Big Ten,
will meet Northwestern, and Indiana's
Hoosiers will meet Ohio State at Co-
lumbus.
Of hardly less importance will be
Minnesota's battle against Nebraska
at Minneapolis, and Michigan's first
appearance of the season, in its an-
nual squabble with Michigan State
College at Ann Arbor. Purdue opens
its campaign by entertaining Rice
Institute of Lafayette. Illinois plays
Washington University at St. Louis
and Wisconsin makes its bow against
Marquette at Madison.
Although , Layden has almost
moaned aloud over Notre Dame's
blocking in practice, the Irish with
five full teams ready for action, are
favored to go off with a victory. The
Texans, also coached by an old Notre
Dame star, Jock Chevigny, appear
capable of making a fight of it, how-
ever.
The championship notions of Iowa
will be settled one way or another at
Evanston. Iowa, a veteran aggrega-
tion, rates an edge, but Northwestern,
with last year's weak spots patched,
will not be a soft touch for the Hawk-
eyes. The Wildcats plan to take to
the air in search of victory, while
Iowa probably will rely on its power-
ful running game.
The Ohio State-Indiana battle rates
as a toss-up.
Ohio State will be playing its first
game of the season against the Hoo-
siers, and but for the latter's sur-
prising show of power last week
against Ohio University, probably
would be the choice. In spite of a
lot of unofficial criticism of his "five-
man" backfield formation, Coach Bo
McMillin of Indiana, has polished it
up for the battle, Francis Schmidt,
Ohio's new coach, scouted the Hoo-
siers last week, and has worked hard
to prepare an antidote for McMillin's
unorthodox maneuver.
Minnesota probably will get a ter-
rific battle from Nebraska, but the
other Big Ten teams figure to check
in with victories. The Nebraska con-
test, however, probably will demon-
strate just how good the highly touted
Gophers are this season.
Ratterman, Former
Michigan Athlete,
To Be Wed Today
Fred Ratterman, Michigan's hard-
luck athlete of the past three years
who shook off his injury jinx enough
last spring to win a letter in baseball,
will be married to Miss Mary Paul,
'36, of Ann Arbor, here today. The
couple will attend the Michigan-
Michigan State game this afternoon.
It is rumored that Ratterman has
signed a contract to play pro football
with the Cincinnati entry in the Na-
tional football loop.
Ratterman came to Michigan hail-
ed as the greatest all-round athlete
ever produced in Cincinnati or its
environs but never played in a Var-

sity football or basketball game.
Dizzy's Wife
Making Plans
For Home Life
ST. LOUIS, Oct. 5- (/P) -Mrs. Jay
Hanner (Dizzy) Dean, nee Patricia
Nash of Gulfport, Miss., says her
plans after the series depend on "how
the series goes." The statement lacks
the incorrigible optimism of her hus-
band.
"I'd like best to open the little
house we bought in Florida and fish
and play golf and keep house, but
I want Dizzy to take advantage of all
these offers he has had, if they still
hold good after the series is over.
"You see I'm determined Dizzy shall
not end his career on a parlor bench."
MONMOUTH COACH SMALL
Bobby Woll, of Murphysboro, new
backfield coach at Monmouth College,
is the smallest and youngest coach in
the Little Nineteen conference. He
weighs 139 pounds, stands 5 feet 5
inches tall, and is 21 years old. For

Change Time Of Game
Today Back To 2 P. M1.
Contrary to a previous an-
nouncement, the Michigan-Mich-
igan State footballgame will begin
at 2:00 p.m. today instead of at
2:30 p.m. as announced.
The game was originally to have
been delayed a half-hour in order
to allow the announcement of the
progress of the World Series base-
ball game. Since the game in St.
Louis is not scheduled to start
until 2:30, however, the original
starting time will be adhered to.
Progress of the baseball game
will be announced through the
public address system during time
outs and at halts during the game.
Yale-Columbia
Tilt Will Top
Eastern Car d

Holds T igers To Eight Hits As Cards Win

k *
STAR
*DUST
*-Bp ART CARSTENS--
Star Dust with this issue begins the
second year of "The Michigan Daily
Sports Staff's Consensus On Impor-
tant Football Games This Week-end"'
- in brief, "the football consensus."
The title is self explanatory. Each
week we shall select the 20 most im-

Other Colleges

To FaceI

Traditional Enemies In
Season's Openers
NEW YORK, Oct. 5-(P) - The
customary calm of the regular sea-
'seqt u ui ie2od llgooI uos
where tradition denlands a few tune-
up games for the big teams before
the start of the serious business of
the season, is broken this week when
Yale and Columbia open the eason
against each other.
Such a contest is rare along the At-
lantic seaboard at this time of the
year, even though "big" games al-
ready have begun to dot the schedules
for the rest of the Nation. The only
explanation for the early date seems
to be that it was the only available
spot on the program.
Columbia again figures to be one
of the major football powers of the
East, despite the loss of a good many
players who carried them to triumph
in the Rose Bowl last New Year's Day.
Yale, with a brand new coaching set-
up, remains an unkown quantity, but
the Elis in "a good season or bad us-
ually manage to provide a real game
for anybody's football team.
In contrast to this, the other con-
servatives start off as usual. Harvard
and Princeton face the customary
curtain-raising opponents; Bates and
Amherst. Penn starts against Ursin-
us; Syracuse meets Clarkson; Ford-
ham opens with Westminister and
Colgate with St. Lawrence.
Having started a week ago, the easy
w o r k continues for Dartmouth
against Vermont, Brown against
Rhode Island, Army against Davidson
and Cornell against Richmond. Navy
has a somewhat tougher prospect
with Virginia but the Midshipmen
figure to be too strong and the same
goes, for Pittsburgh against its old
rival, West Virginia.
The Pacific Coast program is top-
ped by the usual early season scrap
between Califbrnia and St. Mary's
with the Southern California-Wash-
ington State and Stanford-Oregon
State encounters in the supporting
cast.
Ann Arbor High
To Play Team
From Saginaw
Ann Arbor High school will enter-
tain Saginaw Eastern at 10:30 a.m.
today at Wines Field with fair
chances of winning their third
straight gridiron encounter.
This morning's struggle should
mark the turning point of the Purple's
football fortuities for the season. A
victory will give them much needed
confidence while a defeat will prob-
ably tend to send them into the same
lethargy-that made them the doormat
of the Five-A League in 1933.
Following the dummy scrimmage
last night, Coach Louis Hollway an-
nounced the following lineup: ends,
Capt. Jennings and Neilsen; tackles,
Sutton and Johnson; guards, Danner
and Schumann; center, Tasch. Dav-
ies will pilot the Purples from the
quarterback post, Warner and Kurtz
will bear the brunt of the attack at
the halves, and Courtright will start
at fullback.
The above lineup will give Ann Ar-
bor a strong though fairly light line
and a backfield that has plenty of
speed.
MARQUETTE TEAM LIGHT
MarquetterUniversity's average
football player this fall is 185 1-3
pounds in weight, a fraction under
six feet in height.
DANCE at
GRANGER'S

111i TONIGHT 11

portant games in the country and
juniors and sophomores on the sport
staff will make their selections of the
winners. An official score-keeper and
mathematician has been appointed
and he will report on the percentage
of accuracy of the boys' choice each
week.
Ye Olde Editor is, very wisely, I
think, keeping strictly aloof from all
these prognostications. He may, how-
ever, make some observations from
time to time on how the boys are
picking them. For example.
Whoever picked Nebraska to tie
Minnesota must have strong recollec-
tions of these four ties the Gophers
played last year.
I think that Vanderbilt deserves
better than a 4 to 7 chance against
Georgia Tech.
The boys are wise in being doubt-
ful about those West Coast games.
The way things went last week a good
prognosticator is going to have a heck
of a time when he gets near the
Pacific.
Some difference of opinion has also
appeared over the Big Ten openers,
and I don't blame the three hardy
souls who voted for Indiana over Ohio
State. Wouldn't that be something?
Prognosticator's Incorporated is
going to have some good percentages
this week, with many of the teams
still playing warm-up games, but
there is a long, hard season ahead
and fat averages now will certainly
feel the wintery breath of error be-
fore Thanksgiving. So wait for the
fun, Gentle Reader.
Michigan (11) vs. Michigan State
(0).
Minnesota (10) vs. Nebraska (0)-
one vote for a tie.
Iowa (10) vs. Northwestern (1) .

Thirty-Six Former College
Athletes Recalled To Majors
(By Associated Press) Bocek, University of Wisconsin.
Thirty-six former college, baseball Cleveland - Outfielder Ab Wright,
players either have been purchased Oklahoma Aggies; Catcher Charles
or recalled by American league clubs George, Ogelthorpe; Infielder Louis
from the minor leagues, or recently Berger, University of Maryland; Rob-
signed as free agents direct from the ert Holland, North Carolina State;
college campus. Catcher Robert Garbark, Allegheny
Connie Mack, who always did have College.
success in developing college pitchers. Detroit - Pitcher Jacob Wade,
has added nine collegians to the North Carolina State: Pitcher Truett
Philadelphia rester. New York has Sewell, Vanderbilt University; Catch-
added six and Cleveland and Wash- er Gene Desautels, Holy Cross.
ington each five. The complete list New York -Pitcher Charles Dev-
follows: ens, Harvard; Pitcher Floyd Newkirk,
Boston--Pitcher Joseph Mulligan, Illinois College; Outfielder Jess Hill,
Holy Cross; Shortstop Niemiec, Holy Southern California; Outfielder Paul
Cross. Dunlap, University of North Carolina;
Chicago-Pitcher Harry Kinzy, Pitcher Marvin Duke, Georgia Tech;
Texas Christian; Infielder Billy Sulli- Catcher Norman Kies, University of
van, Notre Dame; Outfielder Milton Michigan.
Philadelphia-Pitcher George Cas-
Spartans Gunning For ter, Southern California: Infielder
Charles English, University of Georg-
Third Win Since 1898 ia; Infielder Robert Fausett, Eastern
Since the first Michigan-Mich. Texas Teachers; First Baseman Alex
n Michigan Hooks, Southern Methodist; Out-
ig has won State23,ame lostin two,1898 and been fielder Gerald McQuaig, Mercer Uni-
held to scoreless ties three times. versity; Pitcher Vernon VWilshere,
In 20 out of the 28 games played University of Indiana; Pitcher Mort
the Spartans have failed to score. Flohr, Duke University; Pitcher Ed-
win Lagger, Northwestern; Pitcher E.
Michigan M.S.C. J. McKeithan, Duke University.
1898 39 0 St. Louis -Pitcher Ashley Hillin,
1902 119 0 Texas Aggies; Outfielder Roy Bell,
1907 46 0 Texas Aggies; Pitcher James Walkup,
1903 0 0 University of Arkansas.
1910 6 3 Washington-Pitcher Sydney Coh-
1911 15 3 en, University of Alabama; Outfielder
1912 .55 7 Fred Sington, University of Alabama;
1913 7 12 Catcher Jack Redmond, University of
-1914 3 0 Arizona; Pitcher Ray Prim, Alabama
1915 0 24 Poly; Pitcher Ed Chapman, Mississip-
1916 9 0 pi State.

--Associated Press Photo
Paul "Daffy" Dean put the Cardinals into the lead again for the
world's baseball championship when he held the Detroit Tigers scoreless
for the first eight innings and beat them, 4-1. The St. Louis batters
fell on Tommy Bridges histily at the beginning of the game and gave the
younger Dean a comfortable margin with which to work. Although
Dean's wildness put many Tigers on the basepaths, he was invincible
in the pinches, 13 Detroit runners being left on base. Detroit's eight hits
were well-scattered.
TSTE BOX SCORE
ST. LOUIS ( N.L. )

,
I
>
t,
r

1917 27 0
1918 21 6
1919 26 0
1920 35 0
1921 30 0
1922 63 0
1923 37 0
1924 7 0
1925 39 0
1926 55 3
1927 21 0
1928 3 0
1929 17 0
1930 0 0
1931 0 0
1932 26 0
1933 20 6

AB R H TB RBI SO BB

Martin, 3b.......
Rothrock, rf ......
Frisch, 2b........
Medwick, if......
Collins, lb.......
Delancey, c . ..... .
Orsatti, cf ........
Durocher, ss ......
P. Dean, p ........

.......3 2 2 5
.......4 1 1 3
.4 0 22
.4 0 1 1
. 4 1 2 2
.......4 0 1 2
....,...2 0 0 - 0
.......3 0 0 0
.......3 0 0 0

0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
1.

0
0
0
2
0
1
1
0
1

1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

SB
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Sit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
2
5
2
3
3
9
1
2
0

A
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0

E
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

it
i
i
i

Totals ..............31

4 9 15 4 5 2

1 0 27 3 1

DETROIT (A.L.)

White, cf ..........
Cochrane, c ........
Gehringer, 2b..... .
Greenberg, lb....: .
Goslin, if ..........
Rogell, ss.........
Owen, 3b.........
Fox, rf ............
Bridges, p ..........
Hogsett, p ........
Totals .........

AB R
. 5 1
. 3 0
. 5 0
. 4 0
. 4 0
. 4 0
. 3 0
......4 0
. 1 0
2 0

H TB RBI SO BB

2
0
2
1
1
1
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

SB
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

SH O
0 4
0 6
0 3
0, 6
0 2
0 1
0 1
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 24

A
0
2
2
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
7

E
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
2

Columbia (10 ) vs. Yale (1). f
California (7) vs. St. Mary's (4).
Southern California (7) vs. Wash-
ington State (4).
Georgia Tech (7) vs. Vanderbilt
(4).
Notre Dame (11) vs. Texas (0)-
Wisco'nsin (8) vs. Marquette (3).
Illinois (10) vs. Washington Uni-
versity (1).
Ohio State (8) vs. Indiana (3).
Stanford d(11) vs. Oregon State (0).
Purdue (11) vs. Rice (0).
Tulane (11) vs. Alabama Polytech-
nic (0).
Texas Christian (11) vs. Arkansas
(0).
Navy (11) vs. Virginia (0).
Dartmouth (11) vs. Vermont (0).
Kentucky (11) vs. Cincinnati (0).
Princeton (11) vs. Amherst (0).
THE GODS of football fate will
again be invoked by Harry Kipke
for the 1934 season. In response to
a reporter's question yesterday he
said, "You're dash dash right I'm go-
ing to wear that brown suit again
this year!" Groundkeepers have
provided a particularly succulent
patch of grass immediately in front
of the Michigan bench for Kipke's
consumption.

CHAMPAIGN, Ill., Oct. 5.-(WP) -
Milton M. Olander, chief assistant
to Coach Bob Zuppke at the Univer-
sity of Illinois for the past nine years,
today resigned, effective early next
year, to take a position with a Toledo
manufacturing concern.
Olander, who entered the Univer-
sity from Rockford, Ill., played tackle
at Illinois under Zuppke in 1918-
19-20-21, freshmen being eligible for
the Varsity in 1918, the war year.
After graduating he became head
football coach at Westerh State
Teachers College, Kalamazoo, Mich.,
where he remained until after the
1923 season. He returned to Illinois as
an assistant in 1924, and the next
year became Zuppke's righthand man.
on the Tigers, although they were
trailing by two runs.
* * * *
Whitey Wistert spends his spare
moments before football practice in
tutoring Johnny Gee, sophomore, in
the pitching art. I can't put much
faith in the current rumor that Gee
was sent out hereby the Yankees
for seasoning under Coach Ray Fish-
er's waltchful eye, but the lanky
southpaw has plenty of stuff and
should be one of the Wolverj~ne's best
moundsmen next spring.

7 5 0

.35 1 8 11 1
..................1 1 0
.0 0 0

St. Louis
Detroit .....

0 2 0 0 0*-
0 0 0 0 0 1 --

4
1

r

rill

Earned runs - Detroit 1, St. Louis 4.
Two-base hits - Delancey, Gehringer, Martin.
Three-base hits - Martin, Rothrock, Greenberg.
Double plays - Cochrane to Gehringer; Rogell to Gehringer to
Greenberg.
Left on bases -Detroit 13, St. Louis 6.
Base on balls - Off Bridges 1 (Orsatti); off Hogsett 1 (Martin); P. Dean
5 (Cochrane 2, Goslin, Bridges, Greenberg).
Struck out - By Bridges 3 (Medwick, Delancey, P. Dean); by Hogsett 2
(Orsatti, Medwick); P. Dean 7 (Cochrane, Bridges, Greenberg, Owen, Fox,
Hogsett, Goslin).
Hits - Off Bridges 8 in 4 innings (none out in fifth); off Hogsett 1 in
4 innings.
Hit by pitcher - By Dean (Owen); by Bridges (Orsatti).
Umpires -Geisel (A.L.) plate; Reardon (N.L.) first base; Owens (A.L.)
second base; Klem (N.L.) third base.
Time of game -2:07.

i

11

":

lip-M

WATER
SOFTENER
SALT
For AlI Makes of
Water Softeners
Dial 2-1713

i,

1i

A B.M*O.C.
MUST LOOK THE PART
FOR THAT
WELL-GROOMED APPEARANCE
visit

N NOON DAY LUNCHEONS j
Special-
T-Bone Steak Dinners
WAFFLES FISH & CHIPS
Spring Chicken Dinner Sunday - - 50c
-'" "With All The Trimmings"
o6
O MAYFLOWE R Restaurant
EXCLUSIVELY A RESTAURANT ,

HERTLER
RR 1C

Dewey Smith Barber Shop
South University at East University

GALE HIBBARD and His

c

it

UIIi 1 PTJRC F..RANT) d111111 %V7"III 111

11111

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan