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December 11, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-12-11

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:S

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, D

Americans Are
Named In Nobel
Prize Awards'
Four Doctors Are Listed
As Winners In Medical
Research Fields

Munitions Head Nettled During Arms Hearing

Local Men To 1 What The Others Think Of Us; Lowell Thomas

i

Attend Sessions
At Philadelphia
Ten Members Of English'
Department Included In
Association Programs
Ten members of the English de-E
partment will take part in the pro-
grams of the learned societies whichj

i

A Latin's View On Education
Lyman Bothwell-Gonzales, Grad., gain at college becau-e of the over-
declared in an interview yesterday in wnelining quantity of facts that pro-
, -,.- , . ,+;r r -fessors "insist on cramming into the

I

To Speak Here
This Thursday

rather biting phrases that American
colleges (he has attended four) are
like cigar stores, giving away coupons
for scholastic achievement and finally
a prize in the form of a diploma
when enough coupons have been col-
lected.
Bothwell-Gonzales. who was born

undergraduate mind." What happens
then? he repeated, "Why, the studentj
must cram for a final examination j
and then, perforce, must proceed to
forget as soon as possible as much
as possible, because information is:
excess baggage, and the brain must
be left free and open to collect moret

STOCKHOLM, Sweden, Dec. 10 -
0P)-Four Americans and one Ital-
ian were honored here today in the
1934 Nobel prize awards, while at
Oslo, Norway, the peace prize wentj
to Arthur Henderson, Great Britain's
president of the world disarmament
conference.
The award in medicine is shared by
three Americans. The fourth award
to an American was for accomplish-
ments in chemistry. The other award,
goes to Luigi Pirandello, Italian novel-
ist and playwright.
Three of the Americans who re-
ceived the honors are here for the pre-!
sentation. They are Doctors GeorgeI
Minot and William P. Murphy of the
Harvard University medical school,
and Dr. George H. Whipple of the
University of Rochester, joint win-
ners of the award in medicine.
Dr. Harold Clayton Urey of Colum-
bia University, whose discovery of;
"heavy water," won him the chemis-
try prize, was unable to attend the
ceremony. Lauren Steinhardt, United
States minister to Sweden, acted as
his representative.
The four Americans received a.total
of more than $80,000, with the three,
physicians sharing a $41,318 prize.

i
a
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i

OSLO, Sweden, Dec. 10 -OA)- Sir
Norman Angell, British author and
lecturer, will be awarded the 1933
Nobel peace prize, it was learned defi-
nitely today.
Brumm To Leave

On State-Wide Tour

Prof. John L. Brumm,

head of the

journalism department, announced
yesterday that he would leave today
for a tour of teachers' institutes in
the upper peninsula under the aus-
pices of the State Department oil
Education.
He will speak twice a day at teach-
ers' colleges at Ishpeming, Negaunee,
St. Ignace, Sault Sainte Marie, and
Munising. Paul F. Voelker, State
superintendent of public instruction,
will accompany him.
The subjects on which Professor
Brumm will speak are "New Outlooks
for Education," "The School and
Citizenship," and "Learning to Re-,
member."

meet during the Christmas recess. in Puerto Rico and who retains many coupons.
The majority of the members will at- of the individualistic ideas of his "The result of this," he declared, "is
tend the meeting of the Modern Lan- country was asked for his concep- the emphasis placed on extra-curricu-
guage' Association of America Dec. tion of American universities and lar activities in American universities.
27, 28, and 29, at Swarthmore Col- system of education. His revolt Students go in for these activities to
lege, Philadelphia. against what some people call Amer- build up a defence mechanism against
The American Historical Associa- ican reex rcgimentation of ideas in their class-
tion will hear departmental mem- pected in the light of his previous room, their department, and their
bers as will the section on historical Latin environment, school. The inate urge for self-ex-
! and philological sciences of the Amer- "The average American goes to pression and personal distinction is
ican Association for the Advance- college because he thinks it will add denied to every student, except a cer-
ment of Science, to his earning power, and believes tain qualified few, in the modern in-
Prof. O. J. Campbell will be one that his future employer will con- tegrated educational institution.
of the three principal speakers at the sider the diploma he so proudly It is a defense menanism reacting
first general meeting of the Modern arri ay as pria facie evidence against this 'monocotellidouous tax-
Language Association. Professor of ability," he exclaimed. onomy' in which he is projected from
Campbell's subject' will be "The Bio- "Eaning this degree is like col- his relatively sheltered and pampered
giaphical Approach to Interpretation lecting these cigar store coupons I was previous existence at home and in
~ ~ of Literature.''telling about - three coupons for a high school."
Prof. Howard Mumford Jones will three hour course, thirty coupons a Asked what all this meant, Both-
-Associated Press Photo act as chairman of the discussion year, and, lo," here he threw up his well-Gonzales explained, in a won-
Ircnee Du Pct (front fc'egrounrd), member of the famous munitions groupon Victorian literature, Prof. hands as if to take something from driing tone at this American's ignor-
firm, is shown in what appears to be an irritated mement before the E. L. Griggs will lead the discussion the air, a diploma when you have nce,that I have only been saying
Scriate aims hca ng in Washington. He heard testimony introduced E.n Woris willeadthesdiscusson collected one hundred and twenty !that students are thrown together in
Sentearm hann mWasmgon Heherd esimoy ntrdued on Wordsworth and his contempor- of these cigar store slips!" such large classes that each one's
purpcrling to show that. his firm traded military secrets with foreign ies, while Prof. Bennett Weaver will AchrdigtoBel-Gnates,!t p tuena etoes togemerd y
arms manufacturers. head the committee on contemporary According to Bothwell-Gonzales, it personality becomes submerged by
s man rs.literature. Prof. E. C. Fries will pre- is practically impossible for American mere numbers, and that some outlet
side at the meetings of the groups students to retain any knowledge they outside the class-room is required."
1 "**on practical phonetics and Middle --
TEnglish language and literature. Bredvold's book, "The Intellectual Name Twelve Initiates
T rentyhearfiesAofAmong the secretaries of the dis- Milieu of John Dryden," recently pub-
From the Daily files of cussion groups are Prof. A. H. Marck- lished by the University of Michigan To Alpha Kappa Delta
December 11, 1914 wardt, of the section of present-day Press.
_ f - English, and Miss Hope Emily Allen, ssTwelve initiates to Alpha Kappa
Accoraing to dispatchEnglishvandFMissEHope Eml!e, Professor Jones, who last year re- Delta, honorary sociology fratern-
According to dispatches received R0 e assistant editor of the Early Modern ceived the Jusserand Medal of the t , were anocdthy dayeby
lyesterday by local officials, the en- P English Dictionary, who will act as American Historical Asso.ciation, will John F. Cuber, Grad., president of
tire portion of Arabia in which is in- secretary of the group on Chaucer. address that society at Washington, h na.
cluded the city of Busrah has been Economic Factors Are In In addition to his speech before D. C. His subject is "The Spread of
conquered by the English and Hindu B'the general session, Professor Camp- Nineteenth-Century European Idea The new members are Gilbert And-
coqee yteEgihadHnu Back Of Present Unrest, geieteralCntuy"uroeaI ersn3,Hny ulcGa.
troops, in a recent conflict with thee! bell will talk on The Function of in America."erSon, '36, Henry Bullock, Grad.,
followers of the Turkish Sultan. He Declares Poetry According to Wordsworth" be- At Pittsburgh, Dr. Theodore Horn- Gust Carlson, Grad., Kathleen Car-
fDtr-efore the group interested in poetic berger will read a paper on "Traces penter, '35, Minna Faust, Grad., Mir-
Delegates to the state grange, in (Continued from Page 1) form and general aesthetics. of the Seventeenth-Century Advance iam McCausey, '36, Eileen McManus,
convention at Battle Creek, are istic tariff policies made payment, Professor Jones will speak on of Science in the Writings of the 36, Rose Gershenson, Grad., Esther
awaiting a report of the legislative difficult at best, impossible. "Notes Toward Suggested Studies in American Puritans" before the se-Meers, 35, Barbara VanDerVort,
European Influence" before the Amer- . Grad., Walter Seifert, Grad., and
committee in favor of reducing the' "The economic difficulties and pas- ican Literature Group and Prof. A tion on historical and philogicalBeatrice Sadik, Grad.
mill tax for the support of the Uni- sions which grew out of these eco- Rhsciences of the American Associa-
versity. nomic impasses provided Hitler with . cire i tion for the Advancement of Science.
the platform which has enabled him checking the "Barker Theory of De--
tached Consonants" before the ex-
"Lew" McAllister, a former Var- to gain supreme power. An -extreme peramentaConontsgreptyBarC-eT
sity baseball coach, has signed a form of political and economic na- perimental phonetics group. F
contract with the Detroit Tigers for tionalism now prevails in Germany, In addition Dr. Karl Litzenberg Taxidermist Wood Here
the 1915 season, in the capacity of and we have an example there of how will talk on the "Reputation of Wil-
coach to the recruit pitchers. the nationalistic policies of other na- liam Morris" before the Victorian James Wood, University taxiderm- C I
tions have helped produce a reflex of literature group and Miss Allen will ist, reports that already four bears C
Prof. R. M. Wenley of the philos- acute nationalism in Germany en- read a paper on the "Anglo Norman shot . by Ann Arbor hunters, have
ophy department lectured in Hills- dangering world peace. exts, and the Recently Discovered come to his studio to be mounted
dale last night and will deliver an ! "Racial questions connected with 'Book of Margery Kempt' to the and that he expects from four to
in Lansing. minorities and political and territorial section in Middle English language a dozen more.
adest ng ti La sn ,ambitions are of course prominent and literature. He stated that there have been
aspects intermingled with economic A portion of the discussion period i more bears killed in Michigan this / n
factors. Germany desires the Saar of the group in philosophy and litera- year than in any recent season. The
not only for racial and territorial ture of the Classical Period will be bears are of the type known as black
reasons, but because of the rich na- given to consideration of Prof. L. I. bear. _ Q UICKLYad E
T tural resources to be found there,"-- __-.-----------____ - --
Professor Watkins continued. I(----__ Don't spoil the thrill of getti
"Again, in the case of the proposed Doabout the shipment of your b
Union of Germany with Austria,labnetthintof your b
important economic reasons are to be leaving everything to Railwa
TE CHGA found. Post-war Austria is far from yk baggage and p
S"GIVEUS RHYTHM" being a self-sufficient country and them home on fast passenger
A PREVIEW economic gains are envisaged by both You can take your train home
You have heard things about this parties through the elimination of the that your baggage will be ther
year's Opera, no doubt - that it is customs boundary. AT THE MICHIGAN Rhythm," for Joe is well tamed by Expres service means econ
opening tonight at the Lydia Mendel- "The situation of Austria points to - "COLLEGE RHYTHM" the script man, and he's on the screen pick-up and take a receipt o
ssohn Theater, that one of the chief a basic difficulty. The carving up of with Goo-Goo, his duck, barely long
characters in the plot is a fish, that Europe into many small countries and Joe Pener, Hele Mack Lanny o, enough to inspire the Stacey Depart- swift, sure handling. If you
it is designed to mark the return of the multiplication of customs lines Mary Brian, Lyda Roberti, George Bar- ment Store football team, led by presents to your family and
!bier, Robert McWade the "A-Amer- "All -American" Jack Oakie, into deo-evieo nfrai
the former type of opera for which and trade restrictions, in the Balkans ican Co-Eds," and Goo-Goo, the duck. de- For service or iformatio
for example, cause economic nation- Also a Pete Smith "Goofy Movie," feating the crooked Whimple De-
Michgan s faousand hat t ha - fr exmple caue ecnomi nato IX Travel-Talk travelogue, cartoon, news- prmn tr lvn o' n te
a big cast, lots of choruses, and an alism to be especially productive of re a a lompkin o pro- partment Store eleven. Joe's f e other
abundance of skits. But perhaps we internal economic difficulties and in- gram duty is to serve as a foil for the cap-
ternational friction." Surprise! If anyone were to say in able and pretty Lyda Roberti, who
know - things such as the fact that these jaded days of Hollywood mu- was never more appealing in her
.- g c tsicals and trt'es 11 cotlee l'fe song-and-dance role. Lyda is the
there is satire on everything from op-heaturedan ntavesies on clege ire talented one of the three girls; Helen The best there is
erations to Gertrude Stein, that thej1 d r nre that a entertaining musical picture
choruses do surprising things with Bpcould be fashioned out of such mater- M ack, whos ispe off entally AT I
th oensyie tp n r By iiC~tuCatlon 1 IU ) ial as an ex-All-American on a de- with Lanny Ross, is of meaner ability, S THENA
the modern stylized steps and ar- a n e l eam a d whereas the now-blonde Mary Brian
rangements they have been given, and partment store football team, a nutty is most unimpressive as the object
that the plot involves a play within F. C. Mitchell, superintendent of mascot with a duck, a crooner, and of Oakie's quest
F. C Michel, upernteden ofthree pretty girls, one of whom pos-ofOkesqst
csedt sesses excellent, one mediocre, and Ably directed by Norman Taurog,
What is more, the Glee Club is in- for his correspondence course credit one no talent, he might easily be who is unquestionably of the chain-
corporated, and from what we hear, system, will speak at 7 p.m. today in written off as mentally incompetent. pionship flight at present, "College
they not only furnish their voices, the University High School auditor- I But that's the Hollywood paradox. Rhythm" with its songs, gayety, and
but in some strange way or another, ium,; At the Michigan these dubious in- high foolishness is worth your at-
are reputed to be part of the scenery Mr. Mitchell's talk is being spon- gredients are rolled into a knockout tendance. The program of shorts isAGEN(
in one of the episodes. It all sounds sored by the Education Club. In ad- of a show - a show that at least had above average, and Paul Tompkins'
promising, to say the least, and with dition to the address, he will present the Sunday night patrons laughing offering on the Barton organ is one N A T I O N - W I D E R
ninety "he" men on the stage per- 1,200 feet of motion pictures showing; with it, and not at it. of the best he has arranged.
forming all these intricacies, it should the work carried on the Benton Har- Don't allow Joe Penner's radio ban- i -G.M.W.,Jr.

4
{

cabinet. In the words of Lord North-
cliffe, "he saw more of the World
War than any other man." He was
on all fronts writing for the Amer-
ican public.
At 27 he was an intimate of sul-
tans, prime ministers, and kings. He
was the companion of Lawrence, the
mystery man of Arabia, and confidant
of "Red" Rosa Luxemburg and Carl
Liebnecht, the German Nihilist.
}Lowell Thomas was the only Amer-
ican observer who witnessed the re-
claiming of the Holy Land, who saw
the assembling of the 60,000 camels,
the gathering of troops from many
climes, and the final campaign in the
desert and was able to record these
spectacular events through the lens of
a motion picture camera.
When Allenby began his great ad-
vance the British staff at Cairo rushed
Mr. Thomas to the front in a racing
battle plane.
Tickets for the lecture are selling
rapidly, according to Oratorical Asso-
ciation officials. They may be ob-
tained at Wahr's Bookstore and are
priced at 50 and 75 cents.

Noted *Lecturer Has Had
An Unusual And Varied
Career As Adventurer
Lowell Thomas, writer and lecturer,
who will speak at 8:30 p.m. Thurs-
day in Hill Auditorium on "Adven-
tures in the Air and Around the
World," is a veritable modern Marco
Polo, having been to both ends of the
earth.
There are few men in the world to-
day whose lives have been as full of
adventures as has Mr. Thomas'. Ex-
plorer in Alaska and the Arctic, gold
miner, star reporter on metropolitan
dailies, literary free lance, magazine
writer, both professor and student at
a great college of law, are only a few
of the experiences he has had.
At the time of the World War
Mr. Thomas was sent to Europe
with credentials from the President's

r

i

THE S

AT THE DETROIT CASS
"ROBERTA"

r

Max Gordon presents "Roberta"
adapted from Alice Duerr Miller's novel,1
"Gowns By Roberta." Music by Jerome
Kern. Books and lyrics by Otto Har-
bach. Gowns designed by Kiviette, and
settings by Clark Robinson.
Max Gordon has in "Roberta" one
of the best musical comedies that De-
troit has had the pleasure of seeing,
and that includes "As Thousands,
Cheer" and "Of Thee I Sing." "Ro-
berta" is delightful in its subtleness
of wit, its graciousness of costume and'
dance, and its sophistication of song.
Tamara, in the role of Stephanie,
the Russian princess and manager at
Roberta's is most outstanding. Per-
haps it is her Russian blood, because
she actually was forced to flee Russia
with her mother during the Revolu-.
tion, or perhaps it is just good acting.!
Nevertheless, she is admirable in her
presentation. Her characterization is
well done, but her most outstanding
bit is her interpretation of the show's
greatest song hit, "Smoke Gets In
Your Eyes."
There are a host of other stars that .
do much to back the fine work of
Tamara Raymond Middleton is the

r O THE
DAYL
CONOMICALLY
ng home again by worrying
aggage. Solve the problem by
ay Express. We will call for
ersonal belongings and send
trains through to destination.
with peace ofmind--knowing
e quickly and safely. Railway
omy. We give a receipt on
n delivery ... double proof of
cannot go home, send your
friends by Railway Express.
n merely call or telephone
in transportation
ON FOR 95 YEARS
Y, Inc.
AIL-AIR SERVICE

N
4-

All-American fullback who inherits be not only a good show, but if alli
his aunt's Parisian dress shop, and these rumors are true the Michigan-
he quickly transforms from the foot- Opera should be back on its feet
ball player to a suave proprietor. again, a new institution, more mod-
There is Bobby Jarvis, the manager ern, up to date, and more subtle than
of Huckleberry Haines' orchestra, who ever before.
provides the laughs that have the -C.B.C.
audience in an uproar while he is on,
the stage. Odette Myrtil is the star "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes," "Yester-
customer of Roberta's, and her por- days," "You're Devastating," and
trayal of the loud, cafe singer type "The Touch of Your Hand," to men-
is as near perfect as we have ever tion only a few. There are clever
seen it done. Fay Templeton in the and witty lines that are delightfully
title role is rather limited, but she subtle. There is just about everything
makes a grand old lady. She sings that a musical comedy has to offer.
Jerome Kern's hit "Yesterdays" in a One of our fellow critics claimed
most touching manner. it to be the best thing in its line. It
We can only mention a brief few may or may not be that, but the least'
of the outstanding bits of the show. that can be said is that it's near the
There are beautiful gowns, designed top in the musical comedy field. If
by Kiviette, that are modeled in a you miss it, you are missing one of
most delightful manner. There are the finest shows that has ever reached
some of Jerome Kern's outstanding the Middle West.
works in the field of popular song, -C.A.E.
YPSILANTI NORMAL CHOIR
SINGING UNACCOMPANIED 200 SINGERS
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor

bor

schools.

Models from $33.50
to $60.00.
UNTIL AFTER
Al
December 15th, all type-
writer companies will an-
nounce a price increase of
550A ocn their tandtrd

alities to keep you from "College -
A Small
DEPOSIT
Will Hold a
11YAL

I

PORTABLE
CHRISTMAS
T THE OLD PRICE OF

44

45900

Liberal Trade-in Allow-
ances, and Time Payments
to suit each customer.

I

I

WHA ,A. - STU-~D YING AE2F ORi.Uin D.U . FOR.U '0

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