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December 04, 1934 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT
Gold Describes
Paths Open To
Writers Today
Noted Radical Says They
Must Pick Communism!
Or Fascism

THE MICHICAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1934

Confesses Slaying

Carr Talks On
Necessity For
Youth Congress
County Representatives Of
Coming Convention Hear
Sociology Professor

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Predicting his remarks on the im-
minence of sweeping changes in the
capitalistic system, Michael Gold,
noted radical editor and critic, point-
ed out the two spheres -- communism
and fascism - from which modern
writers must choose their literary ma-
terial, in a lecture Sunday night in
Natural Science Auditorium.
Prof. Howard Mumford Jones, of
the English department, introduced
the speaker, whose talk was spon-
sored by the National Student League.,
Gold opened with an enumerationI
of the literary omens that foreshadow,
the decay of the existing capitalistic
system. James Joyce's "Ulysses," Gold
declared, pictured "the biological de-
feat of a doomed class." It has been
interpreted every way except the ob-
vious and correct way, he continued,
which is as an expression of nausea k

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with the living standards of the lower
middle class in England and Scot-
land.
Lawrence Anti-Rationalist
The "mystical sexualism" of D. H.
Lawrence was called a "prevision of
fascism." Lawrence's anti-rational-
ism, Gold added, is an instance of theI
rejection of science by the middle
class (which created it) during the
degeneration of capitalism.
He traced this anti-rationalism to
the philosophical idealism of Plato,
which he called the main idea under-
lying fascism. This school, Gold as-
serted, held that "truth can be treat-
ed, and what one says is true if he
can put it across."
Other writers symbolizing the grow-'
ing disgust with present-day cap-
italism, Gold declared, are Joseph
Wood Krutch, Ernst Hemingway,
Gertrude Stein, and T. S. Eliot. These
writers, he cointinued, just as the
middle class they represent, must
choose between certain alternatives.
"Some go in for Catholicism and an
implied or open fascism, others shoot
themselves, and a respectable few go
in for communism.'
"Culture at' Low Ebb"
Gold went on to compare the lit-
erature under communism and fas-
cism. "In both Italy and Germany
culture is at a low ebb." In Germany
the number of university students has
dropped from 50,000 to 16,000." He
quoted from the works of several Nazi!
scientists to show that chemistry,
physics, history, anthropology, andj
education had all been distorted and
their progress checked under the Nazi
regime. He also noted the lack of
capable authors, poets, and philos-
-ophers in both of the fascist coun-
tries.'
"The other path left open to the
middle class," Gold continued, "is an
alliance with the working class." It
can lose nothing in a 'collectivist so-
ciety and gain everything."
Gold then described "the great cul-!
tural advance" in Soviet Russia. "Nor
other nation in the world has as fineI
public museums. There were more
productions of Shakespeare in Mos-
cow during the past season than there!
were in both England and the United
States in the past five years."
He pointed out that there are lit-
erary groups in every regiment in the
Red Army and on every battleship in
the Red Navy. All the mechanical ac-
complishments toward which the So-I
viets are striving, he asserted, are ul-
timately designed to "create a new
soul - a new human being."

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he necessity, the arrangements,
-" :and the program for the Michigan
S Youth Congress to be held here Dec.
14-16 were discussed Sat"Irday at a
meeting of Washtenaw County dele-
gates to the congress in Lane Hall.
Prof. Howell J. Carr of the sociology
Sdepartment addressed the gathering
on "The Problems Facing Modern
Youth," depicting the present critical
situation in our society and stressing
the importance of young people for-
mulating and carrying out definite
IA ,U u1 irVOU ideas.
Phillip Kcnnamer (abcve), 19, son He emphasized the disparity in the
d: Feaeral Jud.ge Franklin K. Ken- attitudes of young and old people.
of Tulsa, Okla., was charged The value of the congress, he de-
with first degrec murder after con- clared, was in organizing the opinions
ficsing he killed John P. Gorrell, 23, of youths and in stirring older people
dental student, with the latter's own to consider changes. "The old must
istol. He said he did it in self de- be challenged and challenged again."
tense. "We are in the preliminary stages
of a social process which in other
760 Im ements Of ;countries has led to .a violent revolu-
tion," Professor Parr asserted. "Whe-
Ne . n derthal A 'e Cher it will here'depends on how the
g older generation can be persuaded
In A useum Here to co-operate with the younger."
"We are woefully unprepared for
the present process of readjustment," i
More than 100,000 years ago, a he continued. "There are at present
strange creature, half human, half more than 100 organizations in this
animal, stalked the earth -the Ne- country selling -as a racket --ra-
anderthal man. cial, national, and religious hatred."
Today, the Museum of Anthropolo- Declaring that the cost of the de-
gy is in possession of 760 stone imple- pression will be somewhat liquidated
ments made in that dim prehistoric if young Americans develop a social
age, recently discovered in a cave at consciousness andrealie ethat social
Mugharet et-Tabum, Palestine. derangements are not necessarily
Unearthed by the American School self-righting, Professor Carr said, "it
of Prehistoric Research, of which the is time for young people to make
University is a supporting member, themselves heard, for the next decade
according to James B. Griffin, in will be the most important period
charge of the work on them, the im- since the Civil War."
plements shed much light on that Following Professor Carr's talk,
fantastic culture of the Neanderthal- Arthur Clifford, '35, secretary of the
ic age. The implements, found at a provisional committee, Theodore K.
depth of 50 feet, consist of stone Cohen, '35, publicity director for the
blades, hand axes, points, knives, congress, Samuel Magduff, '37A,
crude hatchets, and flint flakes. They treasurer of the committee, and Mau-
are now in the University Museums rice Wilsie, in charge of housing ar-

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ready for comparative research. rangemens, expalneL e ea s o
Along with the discovery of the the congress.
bones, which was made by Miss Doro- Two delegates are allowed fromd
thy A. E. Garrod, were found some every organization in the state, and
elecis of a early type of Neander- one extra delegate for every hundred
thal man. These bones, though not';mmer rmao-rato teef
shipped here, are of especial interest Ihe registration fee for each delegate
however, as they arc more nearly like will be 25 cents, and prices for ad-
moidern humans than the usual Ne- kmission to sessions of the congress
mdrn nstha nthkelsetonby outsiders will be higher.
Sanderthal skeleton. Although anyone will be allowed to
The stone implements are of the attend sessions, only delegates and
type known as Upper Acheulean to scheduled speakers will be permitted
the Lower Aurignacian. Mr. Griffin, to participate in the discussions. An
directing the comparative work on appeal was made for the selection
the stones, is of the opinion that they 3f every delegate by a popular vote
are very rare specimens. of the organization, so as to make the
They were sent here by Dr. George Congress "democratic through and
G. MacCurdy of Connecticut, who through."
aided in the direction of the excava- A questionnaire on facilities for
tions. ' housing and feeding delegates who
may be financially unable to provide
for themselves was filled out by those
Screen Ref lectons j at the meeting.- _ --
week. Miss Cornell herself will play
(Continued from Page 3) the role of Juliet.
companied by a pianist on the stage This is the first time that the fa-
and a large orchestra in the pit. The mous actress who became widely
high spots on the program are the known for her performance in "The
ventriloquist, who is above the aver- Barretts of Wimpole Street" has at-
age, and a more serious number tempted a Shakespearean role. Two
which is made more effective by a seasons ago she attempted to produce
good stage set and by the fact that "Lucrece," but after a few weeks on I
rain falls on the stage. All the play- the road, which included a short run
ers are good in their line, and they here, the company was forced to dis-
offer a show that is typical of its band.
type. However, it is quite long, and "Romeo and Juliet" promises to be
there is not a great deal of variety one of Miss Cornell's best produc-
in the acts. It moves fast, and the cions. Her performances in the past
dull moments are quite well covered mark Miss Cornell as one of the
up. -C.B.C. country's most outstanding character
actresses, and she should fit in well
with Shakespeare's famous love trag-
edy.
On Sa e Guthrie McClintic has staged the
production amid the settings and

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Prof. Jeserich To
Direct Inlay Clinic
A .three-day clinic demonstrating
all phases of gold inlay technique will
be directed by Prof. Paul H. Jeserich,
of the dental school, at the New YorkE

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Full Dress Shirts not included in this Service

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Dental Centennial, which convenes I"';costumes designed by Jo Mielziner.
today in New York. It is held this AT THE DETROIT CASS The play will be staged in 23 scenes,
year in commemoration of the hun- "ROMEO AND JULIET" with only one intermission.
dredth anniversary of the founding Detroit will for the second time this Assisting Miss Cornell are Basil
of the world's first dental organiza- season, see Shakespearean drama Rathbone as Romeo. Edith Evans as
tion, the First and Second District when Katherine Cornell brings her the nurse, and Brian Ahearne as
of New York Dental Society. company to the Cass Theatre this [ Mercutio. -C.A.E.

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