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November 22, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-22

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PAGE FOUR.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THU RSDAY, NOVEMI1ER 22, 1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY East Is East,
But Less So .. .

"Rl I "

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
As5ociated oRe9iate 3ress
=1934 f 1test 1935
M4EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESSI
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the useI
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone : 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR........... ............JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ..........RALPHG. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR................. ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR .....................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David G. Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
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rion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin, Elizabeth Miller,
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Shappell, Molly Solomon. Dorothy Vale, Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER................ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER........JANE BASSETT
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den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accou~nts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising,David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, John Park,
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WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
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kohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper, Marjorie
Langenderfer, Geraldine Lehman, Betty Woodworth.
NIGHT EDITOR: ARTHUR M. TAUB

YALE SURPRISED the football world
by arranging a schedule for this
year that included eight major opponents. As a
result of that "suicide" schedule, Yale was defeated
in the opening game of the year, by Columbia.
Later in the season the Elis Also lost to Army
and Georgia.
But last Saturday the New Haven team rose up
to administer one of the most smashing upsets of
the year and ruin the glorious dreams of a Prince-
ton team which had been heading toward a second
undefeated season. That one game meant a suc-
cessful campaign for Yale and a bitter one for
the Tiger.
The example of Yale's schedule may be about to
start something in the East. Already Princeton,
looking back over its first six games, has decided
that lack of a single contest which provided
real competition was the cause of its unexpected
downfall. That Yae had a background of compe-
tition cannot be denied.
Whether or not the lack of seasoning under
heavy fire was the chief cause of Princeton's dis-
aster Saturday, one more Eastern school seems
about to recognize a schedule policy that has been
a matter of course in the Middle West for years.
Such schedules do not bring many undefeated sea-
sons, but they do provide contests that are more
interesting and worthwhile because more evenly
matched. They do make it easier to determine the
comparative strength of the nation's teams during
the short season, leaving less to settle in post sea-
son games and arguments. Not to mention the gate
receipts.
As Others See It
A Purely Cultural Education
SOME TIME AGO two presidents, one who gov-
erns the destiny of a great nation, and the
other who educates young men and women to
become useful citizens in that nation, expressed
similar views on a subject which vitally concerns
us. President Roosevelt's speech delivered at Wil-
liam and Mary College, where the President was
conferred the degree of doctor of laws, and the
statement made public by Arthur Cutts Willard,
the newly installed head of the University of Illi-
nois, agreed on one essential, namely the need of a
cultural background in every line of specialization.
For a long time wehave heard controversy re-
garding the value of purely cultural education in
the practical world of today. There has been prev-
alent among us the belief that any study outside
of our immediate field of specialization is not
only idle but useless. Coming from a man of prac-
tical affairs and from one who has spent 20 years
in training engineering students for specialized
careers, their opinion should engage more than a
passing consideration from us if only for these
reasons: first, to furnish an incentive to students
in the college of arts and sciences whose majors
lie more or less in non-professional fields, and
secondly, to help cultivate a new point of view into
the minds of students enrolled in various profes-
sional schools who look upon the requirement of
"empirical" subjects for graduation with strong
misgivings.
The following is an excerpt from President
Roosevelt's address:
-"There is a definite place in American life -
an important place - for broad, liberal, and non-
specialized education. Every form of co-operative
human endeavor cries out for men and women
who, in their thinking processes, will know some-
thing of the broader aspects of any given problem.
GoVernment is greatly using men and women of
this type - people who have the non-specialized
point of view and who at the same time have
a general and extraordinarily comprehensive
knowledge, not of the details, but of the progress
and purposes which underlie the work of specialists
themselves."
The educator reminds us that lack of liberal arts
education has a distinct disadvantage to the pro-
fessional man because "this is not solely a world
of engineers -nor of any kind of specialists. The
day will come when the handicap will certainly
be a source of bitter chagrin to him, and it may
be the cause of monetary loss."
-Indiana Daily Student.

Pragmatism Invades Education
ONE OF THE MOST significant changes educa-
tion has undergone in the last two centuries is
the closer approximation within college halls of the
conditions of everyday life. The falls of the cloister
have been pierced to an unprecedented degree, and
the tempo of its dim and dusty halls has been ac-
celerated as never before. Scholasticism has grad-
ually been forced to retreat before a rising tide of
realism. Scholarship has become a part of life and
life a part of scholarship.
It is desirable as well as inevitable that this
should happen. Life, after all, is man's chief func-
tion, and all his specialized activities should be a
contributing part of it. But today, in the opinion
of many observers, we are in grave danger of carry-
ing the process too far. There is much, they say,
that is not practical, in the usual sense of the
world, and yet is infinitely desirable in the complete
development of man.
There can be little doubt, if one considers how
many of the enriching things of life, lie, for the
man of the street, entirely outside the realm of
the practical, that these critics are to a large mea-
sure right. The world, oi the greater part of it,
does not want great literature, art or music until
it is created. These things, that gave to life so
much of its richness and meaning, fall for too many

COLLEGIATE
OBSERVER
By BUD BERNARD
Here is a story, which in my estimation, is
quite worthwhile.
Three professors at a large university were
discussing the relative antiquity of their pro-
fession --a professor of surgery, a professor
of engineering, and an authoray on banking.
The surgery exper pointed to the story of
Adam's rib and asked, "Is not that in the na-
ture of a surgical operation, and very, very
old?"
"Yes," answered the engineer, "but I believe
I can go you one better. Look at Genesis. Was
not the world created out of chaos in six days.
Is not that in the nature of a remarkable
engineering feat - and more ancient than your
profession?"
The authority on banking was stopped mo-
mentarily, and thought long and hard. "Yes,"
he said, "you have given me a hard nut to
crack, but," he inquired, "has it ever occurred
to you what created chaos?"
The clock in the main library at the University
of Oregon stopped the other day, and repair men
found that a cockroach was the cause of the
trouble, keeping the pendulum from swinging.
d: k * *
Here's a contribution coming from B.B.L.:
A toast to the lovely -
To the co-eds who are like watches, pretty
enough to look at, sweet faces and delicate
hands, but somewhat difficult to regulate
when once set going.
* '$ * *
Here's the heighth of something! At a recent
debate held in a small western college the subject
was, "Are Mice More Beneficial Than Old Maids?"
} * * A
COLLEGE MONOTYPES
It takes all kinds
To make a college like ours.
There is for example the average junior.
He is betwixt and between the conceit of a
sophomore and the cynicism of a senior.
He has what he himself calls "sophistication."
He is thoroughly versed in the ways of women,
yet will spend days wondering why she doesn't
write.
He is seen at most social affairs.
He is always ready and willing to tell you where
the best beer in Ann Arbor can be obtained.
He is beginning to doubt the great wisdom of
his professors, but not his own and infallible
knowledge.
He calls the B.M.O.C. by their first names.
He has supreme faith in Greek letters and
college degrees.
He is in fact the average junior.
It takes all kinds
To make a college like ours.
A Washington
BY STA N D E R
By KIRKE SIMPSON
THE DIGNIFIED Secretary Henry Morgenthau
is described as having received word at the
treasury of Henry Ford's "the depression is over
for us" announcement with a shout of "Whoopie!"
That was the only official New Deal comment im-
mediately obtainable. Very likely it adequately
summed up reaction in the White House and else-
where in New Deal Washington to voluntary enlist-
ment in the recovery acceleration campaign.
The scope of the projected Ford winter opera-
tions bade fair to lift a sizeable chunk of the relief
burden off Uncle Sam's shoulders. More than that,
as Ford does, so much his major competitors con-
sider doing.
It seems strange that this cheering word for New
Deal theories of the present ripeness of opportunity
for business to begin lifting itself out of the post-
depression doldrums should come from Ford. So re-

cently were leading New Dealers such as General
Johnson, and even the White House motor equip-
age procurement machinery, trotting about to ex-
change their Ford-built vehicles for almost any
other make. That was when he was not to be
persuaded into signing up on the automotive code,
for all the verbal brickbats General Johnson could
throw his way.
AT THAT TIME some of the most intimate Pres-
idential advisers believed a face-to-face meet-
ing between Mr. Roosevelt and Mr. Ford would
have cured the situation. They made no secret of
their belief that the two men saw things much
alike. Some of the Ford representatives in Wash-
ington had the same idea. It looked as if the only
thing that prevented such a meeting was lack of a
diplomatic formula as to which would make the
first gesture.
Mr. Ford coupled with his million car produc-
tion plan announcement, to be sure, a crack at
"these alphabet schemes," recalling the Al Smith
"alphabet soup" bon mot. He advised business to
forget the alphabetical lot and go ahead. He also
advised industrialists to "take hold of their coun-
try, too, and run it with good, sound American
common sense.,,
Just what that meant is not clear. The Ford
statement came just on the eve 'of the elections. It
also came while his automotive rivals signed up
under the code were fussing in Washington about
renewal of the pact. Which prompted the timing of
the Ford announcement?
* ** *
THAT FORD is not alone among the industrial
captains in believing the time is at hand to

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THE CLASSROOM IS DARK. You
lean comfortably back and watch
today's lesson brought to life on the silver screen.
The voice of the movie explains the principles in-
volved in the photographed material. No instructor
need be present. Abstract terms become concrete
images on the living screen.
In the not so distant future, such a possibility
may become reality. In recent publications, two
faculty members of the School of Education here
venture predictions on the subject.
Dr. William Clark Trow, professor of educational
psychology, who has, taken motion pictures for
educational use in Russia and inGermany, writes
in the December issue of the School of Education
Bulletin of the possibilities of films for teaching the
principles of education.
"It may be argued," he writes, "that college stu-
dents have attained tosuch a high level of ab-
stract, conceptual thinking that particulars would
be a hindrance to them rather than a help. Or it
may be contended that the ideas with which college
students are academically employed are too ab-
struse for pictorial representation." These argu-
ments are sound, as far as they apply, says Pro-
fessor Trow, but it is fairly obvious that in the
fields of surgery, biological science, manufacturing
and agricultural courses, there is a definite place
for visual supplementary work in the classroom.
Prof. Howard Y. McClusky ventures farther in
his predictions for the future. Writing in the mag-
azine "Education" for this month, he says, "It is not
fantastic to prognosticate that instruction in the
fine arts will be enriched by the extensive accumu-
lations of inexpensive but precise copies of famous
paintings, Libraries of recordings will bring the best
musical compositions of all ages to the average
schoolroom . . .
"Talking and silent motion pictures will take
over much of the laboratory training in the natural
and biological sciences. Film and sound discs will
record units of instruction and lectures by ex-
perts on every conceivable aspect of the curriculum.
Entire courses of study will be outlined in terms
of these mechanical aids.
"Buildings will be equipped with sound-proof au-
dition rooms of various sizes for purposes of indi-
vidual and group instruction. Talking machines,
radio and television receiving apparatus will Abe
standard equipment in the school of the future .. .
a en~itfins-, rf QVrtin wilno1 vc Inr e1 xi sT_ vU

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