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November 22, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Varsity Shows

Improvement In Spirited Practice

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Gridders Work
On New Plays
For Wildcats
Wolverines Turn Dummy
Scrimmage With Frosh
Into Real Fray
Michigan's football team is temper-
mental. One day the boys perform
with the listless despondency of a
team that has been defeated six times;
the next, they are imbued with the
spirit of a winning eleven.
Yesterday's practice was of the lat-
ter type. Maybe the Wolverines
showed more pep than they exhibited
Monday and Tuesday because they
realized that only three days of the
season remain. In any event, they
ran through a signal drill in dummy
scrimmage against the reserves with
renewed vigor.
Work On Blocking
For the second time this week,
Coach Kipke started the afternoon's
drill with blocking practice. A re-
turn to this fundamental was necessi-
tated because poor blocking earlier
in the week marred the precision of
the running game.
The gridders spent most of the af-
ternoon in running through new
plays, the Varsity lining up with a
cast that will probably start against
Northwestern. Bud Hanshue played
at left tackle in the absence of Vier-
gever, and will probably start Satur-
day. -Russ Fuog and Bob Amrine al-
ternated at center, but Ford is ex-
pected to be in condition for the final
contest.
Ellis Remains At Half
In the backfield were Remias, full-
back, Regeczi, halfback, who are
sure starters; Ellis at the other half,
and Jennings, quarterback. Kipke
is still uncertain, but it appears like-
ly that this quartet will constitute
his starting backfield. Bolas, quar-
terback, and Everhardus or Pillinger
have an outside chance to start.
The boys evidently profited from
the blocking drill, for they opened
gaping holes in the reserve line, while
the backs blocked well leading inter-
ference in the signal drill.
Concluding their drill on defense
against a freshman team using North-
western plays, the regulars turned
a dummy scrimmage into a real one.
Fuog started it by tackling a frosh
back, and his mates gave vent to their
bubbling-over enthusiasm by follow-
ing suit.
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YOUNG MEN'S SHOP k

May Replace Viergever At Tackle Saturday

4i 4r

STAR *
* DUST

Lowrey's First Stringers Are
Good, But How About Spares?

I1

Bud Hanshue, big sophomore lineman, may replace John Viergever
at left tackle in the Michigan forward wall for the final game of the
season Saturday against Northwestern. Viergever is suffering from a
back injury. Hanshue has shown promise this season, and has experi-
ence both at tackle and guard positions.
Big Ten Performs Impressively
Again In Inter sectional Games

*-By ART CARSTENS-*
AFTER A DISAPPOINTING football
season, Michigan fans are look-
ing to the basketball team to redeem
some of the Wolverines' lost athletic
prestige, and not without reason, for
Coach Cappon has at least 10 cagers
who are blessed with better-than-
average capabilities.
The following suggestion ils
purely a theoretical one, having
no factual basis, but after observ-
ing the cagers in their nightly
drills, it appears likely that Cap-
pon might be contemplating the
use of a two-team system this
season.
Cappon has several very tall men
on his squad, and he has several
who combine fleetness of foot with
clever ball handling. He has a mania
for tall courtmen, exemplified by the
presence of three former centers, all
well over six feet, on his present first
string team. The five designated as
regulars are John Gee, six feet eight
inches, center; Dick Joslin, six feet
four, and John Jablonski, six feet one,
forwards; Captain Al Plummer and
Dick Evans, guards. Joslin and Jab-
lonski both jumped center on last
year's Varsity; together with Gee, they
are the tallest men on the squad.
Last year, Gee was second
string center on the freshman
team. He was awkward, having his
gigantic proportions as his only
attribute. Coach Fisher devoted
more time to Gee than any other
of the freshmen, andCappon, de-
termined to utilize his height,
worked on him during spring
practice.
The result is that Gee has lost
a great deal of his clumsiness, is
developing a good shot, and is
learning to get off the floor on the
center jump. He's still a long way
from a polished performer, but
his improvement is encouraging.
THE SECOND TEAM contains the
speedsters, with Chelse Tomagno,
center; George Ford and Harry Sol-
omon, forwards; Jack Teitelbaum and
George Rudness, guards. These men
have too much ability to be only a
second team. Ford and Rudness are
the fastest men on the squad, Solomon
is the shiftiest, Tomagno is the best
ball handler, and Teitelbaum is the
best guard.
During the numerous scrim-
mages, Cappon has not mixed the
two teams. He has kept the tall
men on one five, and the speedy
men on the other, which gives
the impression that he doesn't in-
tend to mix them during the sea-
son, but use both teams alter-
nately, as the occasion demands.
A coach is fortunate if he can send
a fast team in to run the opponents
ragged and then insert a team of
giants to roll up the score. If Gee
comes through, and Joslin and Jab-
lonski measure up to expectations, it is
possible that Cappon will not have
one first team, but two.
When the court men on the foot-
ball squad report, Cappon may find
himself with a third strong quintet.
Meyers and Rieck are flashy forwards.
Patanelli and Jennings are good
guards, the latter specializing on long
shots. Everhardus, Oliver, Johnson,
Savage, Regeczi and one or two others
have had considerable experience in
basketball also.

12

A

By FRED DE LANO
With eight intersectional victories
to their credit in 11 such games
played this fall, Western Conference
teams have given the country's grid
fans added proof that the Confer-
ence is the toughest football league
in existence. Three Rose Bowl can-
didates from the east, Pittsburgh,
Colgate and-Army, have had their
only defeats of the year given them,
by Big Ten clubs.
Only twice since the season opened
have Conference teams been on the
short end of scores in intersectional
battles and one other game was a
tie. Purdue dropped its opener to Rice
Institute of Texas and Stanford took
the measure of Northwestern's Wild-
cats, 20-0 last month in Palo Alto.
Indiana In Tie
Undefeated Temple, "Pop Warner's
aggregation from Philadelphia, was
held to a 6-6 tie by Indiana. The,
latter came back last week to down
Maryland 17-14. Purdue aided the
Conference record after its first de-
Minnesota-Buckeye
Game Chances Shim
CHICAGO, Nov. 21. -- (A')- En-
thusiasm for another "dream game"
of the gridiron -a post-season clash
between Minnesota's mighty array,
and Ohio State's spectacular Buck-
eyes for charity - tonight crashed
headlong intoayWestern Conference
rule prohibiting such a contest.
Big Ten authorities were convinced
that the game, which its sponsors
plan for Ohio State's huge double-
decked stadium Dec. 1, with a possible
attendance of 81,000, would never ma-
terialize.
While Governor George White was
bending every effort to enlist the in-
terest of Governor Floyd Olson, of
Minnesota, various Conference offi-
cials said they saw no possibility.

feat by beating Carnegie Tech 20-0
and Fordham 7-0.
The three games that stand out the
most are the ones in which three of
the nation's favorites found Big Ten
teams too tough to handle. Minnesota
downed Pittsburgh, the team that last
week dumped the previously unde-
feated and untied Navy, early in the
season by a 13-7 score, in one of itsI
biggest steps toward the National!
Championship.
Ohio State played host to Andy
Kerr and his Red Raiders from Col-
gate October 20 and beat them 10-7.
That is the only game Colgate has
lost and its latest victim was Syra-
cuse, another who until last Saturday
boasted of a perfect record.
Illini Top Army
Another of the East's best teams,
Army, invaded the Middle West with
a plan of keeping its record unblem-
ished but took a 7-0 licking fromt
Illinois. That was also Army's only
defeat and with it the rating of the
Conference went a bit higher.
The seventh and eighth intersec-
tional wins that have been registered
this year were victories for Michigan
and Wisconsin over Georgia Tech
and South Dakota State.
Michigan's only win of the year
was its sixth consecutive intersec-
tional win, Cornell, Princeton and
Harvard providing the Wolverines
with the other five triumphs in recent
years.
Polo To Be Restored
To Olympics Program
BERLIN, Nov. 21 -(1P)- A return
of polo to the sports program for the
1936 Olympics was announced today
by Dr. Theodore Lewald, president of
the German organizing committee.
The return of polo to the program,
he said, came as a result of Argen-
tina's plea. It last was included in
1924, the United States losing to Ar-
gentina in the final.

I

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