100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1934 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 194

......nxy.n...........r ................ .....................

.l

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulltin is constructive notice to all members of the
:3ilversity Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President
until 3:30; 11:30 a.ni.:'Saturday.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1934 Faculty, School of Education: The
VOL. XLV No. 36 faculty of the School of Education
will hold a luncheon meeting at the
taoic.wlMichigan Union on Nov. 5 at twelve
IPresident and Mrs. Rutliven will o'clock.
be at home to members of the facul-
ties, their friends, and other resi-
dents. of Ann Arbor on Sunday, Nov. Varsity Glee Club: Notice to all
4, from 4 to 6 o'clock. members of a special rehearsal Sun-
day afternoon at 5 o'clock. There

President and Mrs. Ruthven will
be at home to students and their
friends on Wednesday, Nov. 7, from
4 to 6 o'clock.
Faculty Meeting, College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts:
The regular November meeting will
be held in Room 1025 A.H., Monday
afternoon, Nov. 5, beginningprompt-
ly at 4:10 o'clock.
Agenda:
1. Report of Executive Commit-t
tee - Boak.
2. Report of University Council -
Wagner_.
3. Report of Dean's Conference
-Kraus,
4. Memorial, Samuel Moore -
Strauss, Bonner, Campbell.
5. Special Order, Admission Re-
quirements.
As the special order is exceedingly
important, all members are urged to
be present.
D. L. Rich, Secretary

will also be a rehearsal Monday eve-
ning, Nov. 5, 1934, at 7:30, in the Glee
Club rooms. Both of these meetings
are extremely important, as they are
in preparation for the Nov. 7th con-
cert.
Sima Xi: Faculty members and
students who have been members of
Sigma Xi at other institutions, and
who are now at this University, are
invited to affiliate with the Michigan
Chapter. Transfer of membership
may be arranged at the first meeting,
which will be held Nov. 13, or by con-
sulting the secretary prior to that
date.
Lewis S. Ramsdell,
Secretary Michigan Chapter,
3078 Natural Science Building.
University Broadcasting:
1:30-2:00 p.m.- "The Distribution
of the Primary Supplement and
Equalization Funds under the Sias-
Thatcher Act," Eugene B. Elliott, Di-

rector of Research and Personnel,
State Department of Public Instruc-
tion.
Foreign Student Study Tours: The
study tour next Monday should be
of interest to all foreign students.
Mr. Wilfred B. Shaw, Director of
Alumni Relations will speak at 4:45
in Alumni Memorial Hall on the Con-
tributions of our Alumni to the Devel-
opment of the University. At 4 p.m. I
shall personally conduct the study
group through the Alumni Building,
explaining some of the most signifi-
cant memorials. Students will as-
semble promptly at 4 o'clock in Room
1209 Angell Hall.
J. Raleigh Nelson.
Mandlebaum and Marsh Scholar-
ships: Undergraduate students in the
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts may apply for these awards.
Special attention is called to the fact'
that both men and women are eligible1
to the Marsh scholarships. Men only
are eligible to the three Mandlebaum
scholarships. Application blanks
available in the office of Dean Kraus
must be filled out and returned to
that office on or before Nov. 10. NoC
consideration will be given to appli-
cations filed after that date. The
awards will be made about December
first.
James E. Dunlap,
Chairman, Scholarship Committee
Academic Notices
History 11, Lecture I, Midsemester
examinations at 8 a.m., Monday, Nov.
5. Mr. Winnacker's and Mr. Long's
sections in Natural Science Auditor-
ium arid Mr. Scott's and Mr. Slosson's
sections in 25 A.H.
English 153: The class will meet
Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Michigan League.
E. A. Walter
Lecture'
Lloyd C. Douglas, the popular
speaker and author of the novels
"Magnificent Obsession" and "For-
give Us Our Trespasses" will give a
lecture in Hill Auditorium at 8:15
on Tuesday, Nov. 6, on the subject'
"The Flight to Freedom." Tickets
are now available at Wahr's and'
Tinker and Co. on State Street.
Events Today
The Genesee Club will hold its for-
mal initiation today in the Union at
4:30. A dinner will be held after the
ceremony following which Dr. LaRue
of the Botany Department will speak
on "Living and Working in the
Tropics." The meeting will start
promptly, and all members are urged
to attend.

Prof. BromageAdvocates Home
Rule Amendment For Counties

tI

4

f

(Continued from Page 1)1
drawn up by the legislature suitable.
there is another opportunity in thet
power of any county, by means of al
majority vote to adopt a home rulel
charter. Professor Bromage explained
that this proposal may be put on thef
ballot by one of two methods. First,
the county board of supervisors may
draft a home rule* charter, and by a
two-thirds vote, submit it to the peo-
ple. Or, the plan nay be drafted by,
a group of citizens, through petitions
signed by 10 per cent of the voters
who voted in the' last gubernatorial
election.
"The amendment, then, provides for
three methods by which a county may,
obtain a new plan of government.
1. By voting to adopt an alterna-
tive form of government established
by the legislature.
2. By voting to adopt a new plan
of government submitted to the people
by action of the county board.
3. By voting to adopt a new plan
of government placed on the ballot
by initiative petition."
Professor Bromage went ahead to
show that the changes from the old
system could take numerous forms. It
may eliminate any county constitu-
tional office, and may provide for the
number and manner of selection of
the board of supervisors and of all
other officers and employees. The new
plan of government may provide for
the powers, duties, terms, and com-
pensation of all county officers. It is
free to create, abolish, and consoli-
date county offices. "Such broad pow-
ers as these pave the way for a real
overhauling of existing county gov-
erhmental structure," he said.
This amendment, however, will notj

make it possible for counties to so
arrange their charters as to avoid
their duties and obligations under the
laws of the state, Professor Bromage
pointed out, because their forms of
government would still operate within
the powers and duties of counties as
prescribed by the state law.
"The objective of the county home
rule amendment is limited," he stated.
"The goal is simply to permit the re-
organization of county government.
It does not set out to reform all the
problems of area and administration
in local government. Abolition of
township government or the trans-
fer of township functions to the
county is not mentioned in the
amendment. The only way in which
it can possibly affect townships is in
the matter of their representation
upon the county board. This would
not mean, however, abolition of town-
ship government. Both township and
city governments would obviously re-
main in operation."
Michigan does not face a unique
problem in respect to this issue. Al-
ready North Carolina, Montana, Ne-
braska, and Virginia have created
optional law systems of county gov-
ernment. California has had county
home rule since 1911, and Ohio and
Texas ratified county home rule
amendments in 1933.
"The amendment is highly desir-
able, because the uniform system now
imposed by constitutional law on all
counties would give way to a flexible
arrangement," he said. "No longer
would a large county with nearly two
million people be forced to operate
upon the same plan as a rural dis-
trict with but one thousandth of this
population."

WANTED L
CONVENTION ROOMS WANTED:
Anyone having rooms which may be _
rented for Thursday and Friday F
nights, November 8 and 9, by those
attending the convention of the
University Press Club, Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, November 8,
9 and 10, is requested to list them
at once by mali with the Depart-
ment of Journalism, stated location,,
accommodations and price. Listings
must be made by mail, not by tele-I
phone. Address Department of
Journalism, Room 212 Haven Hall,
University of Michigan.

FOR SALE
ANTIQUE EXHIBIT and sale. Nov.
7 to 9th inclusive, Harris Hall. State
and Huron Streets, 9:30 a.m. to 10
p.m. Admission 25c.
the sex menace (thank the Lord)
and the blinding flash of star names.
But it has feeling .. . and intelligence.
-J.C.S.
AT THE MAJESTIC
* , *"OUTCAST LADY"
"The Green Hat" has been done
again, and well. From the $2.50-a-
word typewriter of the "old" Michael
Arlen emerged a story that was not
ruined by Hollywood.
It is given four stars for the act-
ing of every member of the cast, and
because a tragic ending, the suicide
of heroine Constance Bennett, was
not made a "she lived happily ever
after" by coast playwriting genii.
-J.J.F.

I

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

LADIES' size 18 polo cloth coat.
Bought this year, cost $45; will sell
for $13. Phone 2-2845.
FOR SALE: Full-dress coat. Tuxedo
coat, medium large. Best quality.
Call 7522 evenings. Ask for Mr.
Bills.
MAN'S COONSKIN coat., lar e siz
$25. Phone 5244. 613 Hill St.
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 7x
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful Work at low price. 4x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices ret-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006
9x
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
NASH-Custom Tailored clothes.
Measured byEC. Krug, expert tailor.
Office 214 E. Washington. Phone
2-1910 for appointment. 6x
INTELLIGENT care given to children
in my home or theirs. Phone 6152.
NOTICE
FINANCE CO. offers bargains in re-
possessed and repurchased cars.
Many 1934 cars with low mileage
included. We will trade and extend
convenient terms. Open evenings.
311 W. Huron. Ph. 2-3267. 10x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Rhinestone bracelet. Finder
please phone 7118.

Imported and Domestic Woolens

.<

day, Nov. 4. This group will be or-j
ganized under the direction of Pro-
fessor Allen, who will have some time-
ly suggestions which will be of inter-
est and importance to all.
Lutheran Student Club will be en-
tertained by a speech given on Nov.
4, by Rev. John Schmidt, pastor of
Augsburg Lutheran Church of De-
troit, who will speak on "Luther's
Translation of the Bible." Rev.
Schmidt spent two years in Ger-
many and is well qualified to speak
on this subject. This will be the stu-
dents observance of the 400th anni-
versary of this translation.
A supper will precede the lecture at
5:30 o'clock.
Vulcans: There will be a supper
meeting Sunday at 6 p.m. in the tower
room of the Union. Will everyone
please be present.

Screen Reflections
AT THE WHITNEY
"I GIVE MY LOVE"
A good show at the Whitney that
falls into the three-T-class. Tender,
touching, but trite. The reason for
the rating is that this Vicki Baum
pencilled movie story has a good idea,
thusly: To a man, love is a thing
apart - it is woman's whole exist-
ence. "When I give my love, I give
all," says Wynne Gibson to Paul
Lukas, the two principles of the film.
Set in a colorful background of an
artist's private life, the film lacks

I

hen You rae
W DOOURPAR'E
Let a Permanent Campus Organization make
your arrangements at no increase over
regular tariff rates.
Airplane, Steamship, Railway and Hotel
Reservations in any part of the world.
MICHGAN ALUMNI TRAVEL BUREAU
ALUMNI MEMORIAL HALL
"American Express World-Wide Service"
ALIVE..AFTER 2 OYEARS A DEAD MANI
ALI VE... with the secret key to millions
locked in his brain!

I
N

xE

Pre-Forestry Freshmen: All pre-
forestry freshmen are urgently re-
quested to meet in Room 304 of the
Michigan Union at 2:30 p.m. Sun-

I

11

up

ALIVE... with the power to wreck the lives
of the three who wrecked hiss

Where better clothes are made

A. C. Barth
ALTER4TIONS OUR SECIALY

\ U

619 East William Street

Ann Arbor

--AMA JESTIC -
MichweI
Ar/en's
fascinating
heroine bring's
to all lo:ers,
the love story
of a strange
and beautiful
yirl!
6.X me
\ 04

ohm

,: ,:, .. , ,Y,.

Elm

Ma

:.

ti "
?a
:

r >

K

k

YOU don't have to be afraid of Close-ups if you havc
your suit TII-CLEANED. Our nevw cleaning
process will protect you from these embarrassing close-
ups by bringing the fabric back to its oriinal condi-
tion and cleaning all stains from the suit.

ROBERT DONAT
wihELISSA LANyDI
Produced by EDWARD SMALL
Directed by Rowland V. Lea
A Reliance Picture

TRI-CLEANI NG

F-R-E-E
It is impossible to purchase Trichlor-
( hylene on the retail market so we are

14(%U OFF FOR CASH
R. er riire

Ilk I

Hl

II

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan