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October 17, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

17 1

L JLA

J"E-N-S-DA - -1-,-1

Dental School
To Give Special
Aptitude Tests
Will Attempt To Determine
Capacities Of Freshman
Dentistry Students
The School of Dentistry has started
a series of tests to be given to their
freshmen in an attempt to determine
the capacity and fitness for the work
in their chosen profession.
These qualifying examinations were
instituted by the Bureau of Educa-

DIAGONAL
By BARTON KANE

POPULARITY MEN
Phi Kappas Maxwell and Brown
had dates last Satuiday night and
before arriving informed the girls by
phone that they could go anywhere
they wished. As soon as the evening
started they back-tracked, admitting
that they had but 26 cents between
them. The dates, disillusioned, went
home.
The latest petitions being circulated
by the N.S.L. are headed by the catch-

tional Research and Service, and, at line, PETITIONS ARE OUT. And so
the suggestion of the American As- are short skirts.

sociation of Dental Schools, were de-
veloped by the education and psychol-
ogy departments of Iowa State Uni-
versity. The examinations have been
given there for five years, befng im-
proved until, at present, they are pur-
ported to have a diagnostic value. The
School of Dentistry has been asked to
co-operate in this study with the
freshman class.
The first five tests have been ad-
ministered. They were grouped under
five general headings (1) reading; (2)
vocabulary; (3) comprehension and
retention; (4) visual memory; and
(5) pre-dental information. These
first tests are really a series of com-
prehensive examinations testing the
student's ability to master the the-
oretical aspects of the dental curricu-
lum. The last two tests are of a
manipulative and constructive nature,I
to test the inherent mechanical ability
of the student.
The examinations are being scored
and norms are being established in
order that comparisons might be made
with the results from other dental
schools, as well as checking the find-
ings of these tests with the student's
progress through the school here.
Dr. R. K. Brown of the School of
Dentistry, who has charge of this
work, summed up the main objectives:
"It is hoped that these results will
assist the dental faculty in deter-
mining how much work a student can
carry, aid in properly orienting stu-
dents in their dental work, give scien-
tific assistance in vocational guidance,
and formulate a basis for the identi-
fication and diagnosis of individual
and class weakness."

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CORRESPONDENT TROUBLES
Daily sports editor Carstens, sent to
Chicago to cover the game, got lost
and forgot his duty. A wire was re-
ceived later from Russ Read saying,
"Stand fast. Business manager car-
ries on." And he did, a story follow-
ing. The only trouble with it was that
business man Read had Triplehorn
playing right and left half at the
same time.
t Bill Dixon, Union yes man, was
spreading the news by phone that an
assembly to meet the team was being
planned. After c'alling a sorority he
received a call from a girl who said
she'd like to meet the team herself
but would rather meet him. Terrified,
he stayed in hiding in the men's sanc-
tum sanctorum.
THIS CHANGING WORLD
One of the talks on the University's
broadcasting service was announced
in the DOB as being given by "Ar-
mand J. Eardley, assistant professor
of geology at 2 o'clock." Wonder what
he is at 3 o'clock.
Latest political news centers around
a Zete junior who claims to own an
interest in one of Detroit's night clubs.
Said politician offered to get the class
a 20 per cent reduction on an orches-
tra, decorations, etc., in return for
which he asked for Hop tickets to the
extent of the sum he saved them,
planning to then sell these tickets.
The other master minds turned him
down, so he threatens to form a party
of his own.

it, is illegal to have a date on a week
night. Violators are hailed before the
student conduct committee. The pres-
ident personally sent more than 300
home one night. The week-ends in
that town sure must be interesting
events.
Zeta Psi members received part of
their liberal education while in Chi-
cago, as those who went to the game
also attended one of the de luxe bur-
lesques in a body. The next develop-
ment will probably find Commander
doing a fan dance.
PERSEVERANCE
Alumnae House planned to have a
midnight fire drill recently and the
news leaked out. Two freshmen,
thinking this was a chance to leap
at, took up a station outside, and at
dawn were still there. Later they,
found all had been canceled at the last
minute.
Mosher-Jordan gals are fast becom-
ing poor because of a rage they have
developed for the singing taximan, as
they have dubbed him. En route to
any spot he croons to his passengers,
some of them so enchanted that they
just ride. And all this in spite of the
NRA fair competition clauses.
DOUBLE PRESIDENT
Dex Goodier, Delta U flash, is re-
ceiving congratulations these days be-
cause The Daily listed him as presi-
dent of Druids. O'Neill Dillon, the real
head man, is considering suing The
Daily; Goodier plans to take several
new subscriptions. We expect to break
even.
BOTANIST SPEAKS TODAY
Dr. William Randolph Taylor, pro-
fessor of botany, will speak at the
regular meeting of the botany semin-
ar at 4:30 p.m. today in Room 2003
of the Natural Science Building. His
subject will be "Central American
Ports of the Hancock Expedition."
Professor Taylor was.a member of
the Hancock expedition last year.

R.O.T.C.Unit To
Present Mock
Court Martial
The advanced unit of the Univer-
sity R.O.T.C. is reproducing the proc-
esses of an actual court martial this
week.
Somewhat in the manner of a
drama, parts have been assigned to
the different members of the unit,
even to the witnesses, and the accused
has been provided with lawyers in
abundance.
Two trials are being carried on of
the same case, the two main divisions
of the advanced unit forming the
courts. An entirely different person-
nel is being used in the two sections.
While as yet no plea of insanity has
been advanced, the general procedure
is much like that of a civil court. At
present, the courts have taken a recess
to allow the trial judge advocates,
who correspond to the civilian prose-
cuting attorney, to obtain additional
evidence.
READ THE WANT ADS
-

;,

A

STYLEFUL
CLOTH ES
FOR THE
COLLEGE MAN
For genuine all-around value,
there is nothing comparable
to a Michaels Stern Suit- for
in fabrics and workmanship,
they are the best for the price;
in style and fit unexcelled at
any price. Come in. Compare.
Thme SUITSr
with Two Trousers
$30. - $35.

U

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810 South State CLEANERS and DYERS Phone 6868

i

No

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an

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1

Eight Other Important Concerts, including BOSTON and
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRAS, DON COSSACK CHORUS,

Tickets for Single Concerts:
$1.00, $1.50 and $2.00, and for
the Season (10 Concerts)
Of mm 'Ot Aft ~ __A wee Ow Af w __

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