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September 18, 1934 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Member of
associated Press

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XLV. No. 1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1934 PAGE ELEVEN

fty Players

Return For

Early Football Practice

Freshmen
To Inspect
I-MPlant
nitramural Staff Plans An
Extensive Introductory
Tour of Athletic Plant
r ourneys Feature
Orientation Card
ibbons Will Be Awarded
For Firsts, Seconds In
Thirteen Title Races
Offering thirteen sports and the fa-
lities of the Michigan Union to the
ass of '38, the Intramural depart-
ient of the University will' provide
Vree days of participation in or-
Lnized games or informal competi-
on to the entire freshman class.
Starting Tuesday at 4:30 and on
Le following two days at the same
me, groups of freshmen will meet
the Intramural building (hereafter
;be known only as "The I. M." to
1 loyal sons of the Maize and Blue)
id troop through the huge athletic
ant to view its unexcelled facili-
es. Immediately following this tour
inspection which will be ably
>nducted by the leather lunged
iaches of ye olde Michigan, competi-
gn will begin in badminton, boxing,
deball, fencing, gymnastics, hand-
,1, horseshoes, rifle shooting, squash,
imming, volleyball, and wrestling.
Details In Handbook
All freshmen interested in these
orts should consult the Orientation
eek Sports Program, obtainable in
e I. M. office, for details concern-
g places and instructors.
Bowling enthusiasts may turn in
e scores of two games to be bowled
the Union anytime during the week
id the highest score will be awarded
*e I. M. title.
Golf and tennis tournaments will
crt on Saturday, September 22. The
lfers will tour the 18-hole Ui-
rsity course in quest of the low
edal score which was won last year
Bob Gault. The tennis matches
11 commence at nine on Saturday
orning and continue through until
e champion is discovered.
Freshman Codeball
Ray Fisher, freshmen football
ach, requests all men who plan to
me out for freshman practice to
port to him at Yost Field House at
p.m., Monday, September 24. The,
-st session will be limited to the
ing out of equipment and a light
nbering up drill, but a large squad
anticipated and drills will continue
stiffen until the team is paired
wn to manageable size. The aim of
rich Fisher will be to whip the frosh
to shape for the annual tilt with
e Varsity which usually takes place
out a week before the opening game
the season.
All freshmen to place first or sec-1
.d in the I.M. tourney in any of the
heduled events will receive ribbons
recognition of ability.
To the freshman who makes the
ghest total score on the rifle range
er a three-day period the R.O.T.C.
11 present a .30 calibre Krag rifle.
The swimming and bowling facili-
s of the Michigan Union will be
en to the freshman class during
dentation Week without charge, and
usual will be taken advantage of
a large group of incoming men.'
Sigma Delta Psi

Both freshmen and upperclassmen
e eligible to try out for Sigma Delta
i, national honorary athletic frater-
ty. In order to secure membership,
'teen athletic tests must be success-
lly passed. All men interested in
is fraternity should report to Mr.
ebster at the Intramural Building
me time during the week of Sept.
Participants should wear old clothes
.d gym shoes when they report at
e I-M building during Orientation
ek. With the exception of tennis
cquets and golf clubs, all playing
uipment will be furnished by the
partment. During the tour of in-
ection, personal belongings such as
cquets and golf clubs may be
ecked.
Should rain mar the festivities,
eshmen are instructed to come to
e Intramural Building regardless,
d take part in the indoor activities

To Lead Wolverines' 1934 Title Race

m lw

F'

.'

Hurls No-Hit Game

STAR *

AUSTIN
Tackle

i

Captain Thomas Austin, regular tackle on the championship Wol-
verine teams of the past two years, who will attempt to lead the 1934
squad to its fifth consecutive Western Conference title and its third
consecutive national crown on Mid-West gridirons this fall. Austin's
home is in Columbus, O.
Michigan Brings College Golf
Title To West For, .First T'ime

* DUST
*-By ART CARSTENS-*
WHEN PRESIDENT ALEXANDER,
RUTHVEN came out of his office
the other day looking as though he
had just heard that the enrollment
had jumped to 20,000, someone asked
him why the jubilant expression?
"Boy, oh boy, did you hear that ball
game?" he answered. "They won in
the ,twelfth on Gehringer's homer!"
We feel the same way. It's a real ball
club that Mickey Cochrane is leading
toward the World Series. Star Dust
cannot, we feel, open the year more
auspiciously than by toasting the
Tigers. May they win the World
Series!
* * *
STARDUST is glad to offer its wel-
coming hand among the many
that are outstretched in greeting to
the class of '38. We hope that in your
four years here you will witness as
many athletic triumphs as we have
seen in the past three and Star Dust
places itself at your service as inter-
preter of those triumphs - and the
defeats that inevitably must come. If
you are an athlete yourself Star Dust
will record your exploits, if only a
spectator, Star Dust will acquaint you
with the feats of your classmates.
* * *
And here's our salutation to
the king of sports - football. Let
the Tigers and Yankees scrap
over that pennant, soon the thud
of toe on pigskin and the thun-
dering stadium crowds will drown ,
all Patsy O'Toole's and the rest
of that baseball hulabaloo.
., * *
On the strength of seeing little
more than than the distribution of
uniforms to fifty football candidates
we're going to discuss the prospects
for this year's Wolverine outfit. Two
points of doubt stand out: 1. Will Bill
Renner be able to stand the physical
punishment of another national
championship campaign? 2. Can Kip-
ke find a capable blocking back?
ON RENNER, we feel, hangs
the fate of the ball club. Bill
left school at the end of the first
semester last year after having
his appendix removed. The last
we heard of him last spring he
had lost considerable weight and
did not seem to be regaining it as
fast as was expected. Renner has
always been rather fragile and
the loss of even a few pounds may
be disastrous. He is apparently
ready to go now and it is obvious
that he will start the season as
first string quarter and number 1
passer.
If Renner does fail to come through
(continued on Page 13)

By SHELDON C. FULLERTON
Another National Intercollegiate
cup, a trophy born in the east and
bred in the east, has at last, like
so many others before it, moved
west of the Alleghenies. After
thirty-seven years spent in knock-
ing around the trophy cases of Yale,
Harvard, Dartmouth and Princeton
the Maxwell Cup, comes fittingly to
rest in the already overstuffed trophy
rooms at Ferry Field.
June's sporting events seldom
make good reading in September's
football - filled chronicles, but to
Wolverine followers the National
Intercollegiate Golf Championships
of 1934 carry a real punch. Staged
in June on the tortuous rolling and
wooded fairways of the beautiful
Country Club course in Cleveland,
they produced, for the first time in
history, a western golf champion, a
champion wearing the Maize and Blue
of Michigan.
Malloy and Seeley Tied
Paced by their brilliant number one
man, Charley Kocsis, the remainder
of the Wolverine quartet, Woodrow
Malloy, Clarence Markham, and D.
Seeley stuck doggedly to their guns to
oust Yale from its three-year stay at
the top. Only three strokes was the
margin separating the two teams,
and thanks for those few deciding
points go to Kocsis, who led the en-
tire list of 123 entrants after 36 holes
of a two day qualifying round. Koc-
sis shot a steady 74-73-147, part of
it in a driving electrical storm, to
take the pole position away from
Charley Yates. of Georgia Tech, Ed.
White of Texas, and Bob Ryden of
U. C. L.A.
Malloy came in with a 77-77-154
to deadlock Seeley, whose 78-76 for
another 154 placed him five strokes
ahead of Markham's 80-79-159. This
gave the Wolverine entry a team total
of 614 to beat out Yale's 617 with
the veterans Oliver Transue and Law
Weatherwax showing the way. Georg-
ia Tech, with Yates and Berrien
Moore as pacemakers, also threat-
ened Yale's hard-pressed sharp-
shooters, but fially had to be con-
tent with 618, one stroke behind the
Bulldogs. Other team totals were
Notre Dame 623, Texas 635, Prince-
ton 636, Minnesota 657, Washington
664, Pittsburgh 665, Georgetown 667,
Cornell 667, Buffalo 692, and Dart-
mouth 699.
Koesis' Play Sensational
Michigan, with one championship
tucked safely under- its belt, threwv
Kocsis, Malloy, Markham, and Seeley
into the fight for the individual
crown as well, but a combination of
brilliant play and the breaks proved
too big a barrier for them to over-
come. Charley Yates of Georgia
Tech, a tow-headed protege of Bob--
by Jones, finally crashed through in

COACH RAY FISHER
* * *

much as a perfect golf machine, he
had been sending towering tee shots
and pin-splitting irons dead to the
greens all week. He had pulled bird-
ies out of the bag when they were
needed; he had substituted a mashie-
niblick for a putter to sink his ball
when the greens had taken on the
appearance of fish-ponds in the pour-
ing rain. In the first round of match
play he had eliminated the well-
thought-of Burt Resnick of Yale, 3-2.
Berrien Moore, one of Georgia Tech's
aces, felt the power of the Wolver-
ine's play in the second round, bow-
ing by a similar score of 3 and 2. The
quarter-finals found Kocsis paired
against his own team-mate, Woody
Malloy, who labored futilely to hold
his own. The score of that match
was 9-8.
Meanwhile White had taken Fred
Towne of Yale, A. F. Kammer, Jr., of
Princeton and Johnny Banks, the
Notre Dame sensation, over the coals
in his three matches.
Battling tooth and nail for every
stroke, Kocsis and White tangled, in

°There Is Life In
The Old Arm Yet"
--Fisher Proves It
Ray Fisher, Michigan's Varsity
baseball coach, still has a few good
games in the 47-year-old right arm
which for many years twirled for the
New York Yankees and which ended
its major league career with the Cin-
cinnati Reds in 1921.
And the folks up around his home
country in Vermont are the best sup-
porters of that belief. For the Ver-
monters, as loyal fans as any to be
found according to Fisher, today be-
lieve that Ray could beat the Giants.
All this in view of a little perform-
ance he put on last week, in a game
between Vergennes and the Queen
City Blues of Burlington.
Ray went out that day, expecting
to work three or four innings. Fifty-
five minutes later, for Fisher has al-
ways worked fast in the box, he had
hung up a no-hit no-run game, and
seen his teammates score four runs.
The box score also showed that only
one opposing player reached first
base, on an infield error.
Georgia Tech
Faces Suicide
Grid Schedule
To Encounter Michigan,
Alabama, Duke, Tulane
Florida, andGeorgia
Led by their 135-pound quarter-
back, "Shorty" Roberts, who has
called the Georgia Tech signals for
two years, the Yellow Jackets are
faced with the problem of building
an organization powerful enough to
carry them through a schedule in
which they must face Vanderbilt,
Duke, Michigan, North Carolina, Tu-
lane, Auburn, Alabama, Florida, and
finally their arch-foe, Georgia. The
technocrats will be a bit battered by
December 2.
Although he has lost Captain Poole
and Bob Tharpe, outstanding line-
men of last year's team, and "Wink"
Davis, one of the best of last year's
backs, Coach Bill Alexander faces this
season with a great deal of confi-
dence.
"Sundial" Martin, a mountaineer,
from the hills of South Carolina, who
got his nickname trying to get water
out of horological ornament on the
Tech campus turned out to be the best
of Coach Alexander's backfield pros-
pects.
pects. With the Wilcox brothers at
guards and "Pee-Wee" Williams at
tackle Tech has the nucleus of a good
line. Jack Phillips, an extremely dan-
gerous triple-threat man, is the chief
Tech offensive threat. It will be in-
teresting to note what the Michigan
line will do to "Shorty" Roberts,
whose 135 pounds have already car-
ried him successfully through two
bitter football campaigns.
Coach Alexander thinks that the
Yellow Jackets will at last shake off
the one-point defeat jinx. Last year
Tech dropped four games by three-
point or less margins, and despite this
had a fairly successful year.
DUNLAP IS EXCEPTION
NEW YORK, Sept. 17. - M) - Golf
experts preach, "hit from the inside
out, don't cut across the ball." But
George Dunlap, National Amateur

(continued on Page 12)

__

wolverine Squad List

Following is the 1934 Michigan:
the first practice Saturday:

football squad as it reported for

Amrine, Robert O.
Aug, Vincent J. .
**Austin, Thomas I
Barnett, David G.
*Beard, Chester C.
Bissell, Frank ....
*Borgmann, Willia
Bolas, George.
Brandman, Charle
Carr, Carl W., Jr.
Ellis, Joseph 0..
Everhardus, Chris
Fisher, Joe ......
**Ford, Gerald ..
**Fuog, Russell J.
Garber, Jesse G.. .
Grauer Robert

Class
..........'37
........ '37
D. (Capt.) '35
..........'37
..........'35
..........'37
*m F. ....'35
.'36
5.........'37
. '37
. '37
.'37
.... '36
..........'35
.'35
. '37

%X ui i, U C G . . . . . . . . . . . o
Hanshue, Cloyce E. ........'37;
**Hildebrand, Willard H.....'35
*Jacobson, Tage O.........'35
Jacobs, Phillip H. ..........'37;
James, Richard H............36
Jennings, Ferris............'37,
Johnson, Ernest C. ........'3
Kidson, James .............'36
Lett, Franklin .............'37;
Liffiton, Jack K.............'3
Meyers, Earl J.............'37;
Mumford, John ...........'37;
**Oliver, Russell D. ........'35
Oyler, Thomas T. ..........'37;
Patanelli, Matthew L. ......'37;
Pederson, Ernest A. ........'37;
Pillinger, Harry J...........'36
Pope, Vincent .............'36
**Regeczi, John M.........'35
Remias, Steve ..............'36

r
5
5
'7
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
5
7
6
6
5
6

Pos.
HB
HB
T
HB
G
G
G
QB
QB
HB
QB
HB
T
C
C
G
E
G
G
T
HB
HB
QB
E
HB
E
FB
E
FB
FB
E
E
G
QB
FB
FB
FB

Years on
Squad
0
0
2
0
2
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
2
2
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
1

Home
London, O.
Cincinnati
Columbus, O.
Detroit
Youngstown
Pittsburgh
Ft. Wayne
Chicago
Findlay, O.
New Rochelle
Eagle River
Kalamazoo
Ann Arbor
Grand Rpds.
Chicago
New York
Maumee, O.
Kalamazoo
Hartland
Detroit
S'lt S. M'rie
Detroit
Ann Arbor
Grand R'pds.
Chicago
Battle Creek.
Lakewood, O.
Detroit
H'land Park
Pontiac
Cincinnati
Elkhart, Ind.
Grand Blanc
Whitehill
Dearborn
M'kegon Hts.
Chicago

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