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September 18, 1934 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEP

tadio Season.
['o Start With'
3arent Program
pening Broadcast Will
Be Sunday, Oct. 7; Is
Tenth Year of Series
ist Noted Speakers

Stud entt-Alum'Iuti

e ad

niversity Night
Details To Be
In Near Future

Program
Finished

The Bureau of Radio Service of the
rniversity will open its 1934-35 sea-
on Sunday, Oct. 7, with the Parent
|ducation program, continuing for
he tenth successive year its func-.
on of co-operation with. the citizens
nd schools of the State in the field
f education.
bight distinct series of programs
ave already been arranged, and a
inth, termed the University night
rogram, will be announced in the
ear future.
Mrs. D. W. Stewart, president of the
Zichigan Congress of Parents and
eachers, and C. A. Fisher, assistant
irector of the University Extension
ivision will give the opening talks;
n the Parent 'Education program,
hich will be presented every Sunday
t 1:30 p.m. up to March 31. W. D.
:enderson, director of the Extension
ivision will follow with a talk
'ctober 14 on "Taxation and the
chools."
Prof. Joseph E. Maddy of the
chool of Music will continue to
nduct the music-instruction classes
hich have been under his super-
.sion for the past four years. Classes
i stringed instruments will be held
[ondays at 9:15 a.m.; wind instru-'
ents on the same day at 2 p.m.;
nging on Tuesdays at 9:15 a.m.
The Michigan My Michigan series,,
hich has been planned to inform
ichigan students and citizens of the
atural resources, industries, educa-
onal facilities, and recreational op-
ortunities of their State, will be
>ened by Prof. Armand J. Eardley
fthe geology department, who will
peak on "Ore Deposits and Why
hey Are Here." He will be followed
y other members of the faculty on
Uesdays at 2 p.m.
Dr. Robert G. Rodkey, professor
banking aind investments in the
chool of Business Administration,
ill give the opening address in the
ries on vocational guidance October
7. Dr. Rodkey's topic will be "The
anker."
The vocational guidance series has
en held the most popular of the1
:'ograms by the high schools of the
tate in answers to a quiz sent out by
e Extension. Division last year. The
urpose of these programs is to pro-
de high school students with in-
)rmation that will be helpful in
Noosing their vocations. Talks will
e given on library work, aviation,
mitary engineering, and social serv-
e work early in the year by men in
ie faculty specializing in these fields.
The language series will be opened
ct. 18 by Prof. Fred S. Dunham of
ae Latin department who will discuss
he question, "Why Study Latin."
ater talks will be made on succes-
ve Thursdays at 2 p.m. by men in
ther language departments.
Carl G. Brandt will open the speech
pries October 19 and will be followed
y Prof. G. E. Densmdre the following
eek. A Varsity debate will be broad-
ast Nov. 2.
Six programs will be given on
ie student health series, which will
e opened by Dr. Emory Sink.

Prof. Henry C.' Anderson, of the
College of Engineering, last year was
appointed director of all student and
alumni relations, with broad advisory
powers relating to every activity in{
which students take part.
Track Squad
California To
Meet In 1935
The Board in Control of Physical
Education last week gave formal ap-
proval to the University of Michigan-
University of California track meet
to be held April 13, 1935, at Berkely,
Calif.
The Wolverine track team, which
probably will be composed of 22 men,
under Coach Charlie Hoyt, will leave
Ann Arbor immediately upon the
close of classes for spring vacation.
The proposed schedule calls for the,
arrival of the team in Los Angeles
in sufficient time to guarantee two
days of conditioning there.
The trip will be the third which a
Michigan squad has made to the
Pacific Coast since 1902. In 1902 a
Michigan football team. vanquished
Stanford, 49 to 0, in the first of the
series of games which are now held
as a part of the annual 'Tournament
of Roses.
In 1921 the first Michigan track
team to journey to the coast was de-
feated by California, 95 to 43.
The Board also approved the
awarding of a Varsity golf letter to
Dana P. Seeley, '35, who tied for sec-
ond low medal honors on the Michi-
gan teams in the National Inter-
collegiate golf meet.
bl

Regents Play
And Leoislate
At Frankfort
Various Activities Are
Combined During Stay
At President's Home
All work and no play makes Johnny,
a dull boy.
Hence, the Board of Regents tossed
aside their dignity for a week-end
and, held a house party meeting com-
bining the business of administrative
legislation with the pleasure of a two-
day visit at the summer home of
President Alexander G. Ruthven at
Frankfort, Mich.
The practice was inaugurated last
year by President Ruthven and now
each summer he invites the regents
and their wives to spend two days in
Frankfort. At this time they hold
their annual summer meeting.
Friday evening the Ruthvens enter-
tained the week-enders at dinner at
the nearby Crystal Downs Country
'Club.
The more ardent mashie-wielders
took to the golf links Saturday morn-
ing, after which the President and
Mrs. Ruthven entertained at the
ranch house of the Rolling-R Ranch,
the name which the President has
ascribed to his summer home.
The ranch was the scene of a rodeo
in which all members of the Ann Ar-
bor summer colony at Frankfort took
part in the afternoon. The Presi-
dent disyplayed his ability and that of
his horse as jumpers while the Presi-
dent's son, "Bud," excelled in the
usual cowboy gymnastic riding..
A couple of steers were borrowed
from a neighboring farmer to give the
real, far-western touch to the pro-
ceedings but only one steer would bive
a really worthwhile exhibition, tum-
bling the President's son into the
dust on several occasions.
In the evening the whole party had
dinner at a hotel in Frankfort which
overlooks the harbor and Lake Mich-
igan beyond.
NEEDS STEPLADDER
NEW YORK, Sept. 17. - (R) - Pete
Bostwick may be one of the best polo
players in the land, but he'd never be
able to prove it if he didn't get some
one Ito help him on his horse. The
stirrups are almost as high as his
head.
--

Prizes totalling approximately $10,-
000 are offered each year by the Uni-
versity for the best work done here in,
creative writing. The winning manu-
scripts are those which have been
chosen above others in an annual con-
test known as the Avery Hopwood
and Jule Hopwood Awards, or more
familiarly as the "Hopwood Contest."
By reason of the terms of the
will of the late Avery Hopwood, prom-
Looks Like It's
Re-Deal Time In
NamingO f Cities
WATERTOWN, Mass., Sept. 17. -
(P)-Frank G. Richardson's hobby
brings to light some oddly named
places in the United States. He saves
postmarks.
To begin with he has Coffee and
Toast, which are in Georgia and
North Carolina, respectively. He also
has Nine Times, South Carolina, Eve,
Ky., Ono, Georgia, and Eve and O.K.,
Ky.
Richardson says his collection will
be only Soso, (Miss.), until he adds
his own name which is Frederick
Gleason Richardson. He knows there's
a Frederick, Ill., a Gleason, Tenn., and
a Richardson, Ill.
Others in his collection are Top
(Ore.), Bottom, (N.C.), Diamond,
(Pa.) Hart (Michigan) Spade, (Ind.),
and he's after Clubb (Mo.). To com-
plete his cards he has Ace, (Texas),
King (N.C.), Queen, (Pa.), Jack
(Ala.), and Joker, (Va.).

inent American dramatist and play-
wright, and a graduate of the Uni-
versity in 1905, one-fifth of his estate
was set aside for the purpose out-
lined above.
The contest itself embraces four
felds of effort in writing, namely,
poetry, drama, fiction, and the essay.
Awards are made in each field. Fur-
ther there are two main divisions of
the Hopwoods, known as the major
and minor awards. The major awards,
totalling the largest amounts, are
open to graduatestudents and seniors
only.
Minor awards, given in all four of
the fields, are open to all properly
qualified undergraduate students, and
carry awards as high as' $250 each.
In addition, there has recently been
established a special contest for fresh-
men and open only to freshmen. This
also embraces work in all of the four
fields, and carries awards of $50, $30,
and $20 in each.
The Hopwood Contest for 1934-35
will be the fifth since the original
one was given in 1930-31. The con-
test for, freshmen was started in
1931-32 and has continued success-
fully since.
Prof. Roy W. Cowden of the English
department heads the committee
which is in charge of the awards and
contest proper. Further details of the
Hopwoods will be given at a later date
and will include more definite rules
for this year's contest.
EXTREMES
Yellowstone Park experienced the
driest May and the wettest June in
its history this year.

Hopwood Awards Give Student
Prizes In Creative Writing

THE LAUNDRY DOES IT BEST
It costs so little to have your clothes perfectly
laundered. Get them back crisp and clean.
Phone us today.
MOE LAUNDRY .
Phone 3916 204 N. Main St.

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HANDKERCHIEFS, STAPLE and FANCY TOWELS,
BATH TOWELS, and LINENS

Prices are always reasonable.

f ;I
In classrooms, in ballrooms, in the stadium as
well as in the more intimate realms of sor-
ority and fraternity rooms Michigan is con-
cious of what is right in apparel and appear-
ance. Any garment's natural beauty and'
brilliance is dependent upon being properly
cared for.
For more than a score of years,
students who are acquainted with
Michigan institutions and estab-
lishments have endorsed the me-
ticulous quality of Goldman Bros.
work.
Whether it be a roughish pair of
slacks or whether it be a delicate
fabric of a scintillating formal-
you may be assured that it will It is our sincere wish that the
return to you perfectly condition-
ed. The material will in reality class of 3'8 may enjoy
be retextured to restore newness
and glamour. Michigan and its traditions
throughout the coming year.
An additional feature at no extra'charge-
Re-Texturing
It makes your garments wear longer, keep
a better press, renders them stain resisting,
0 water repellent, and gives them .a better
general appearance.
Branches For Your Convenience PHONE 41
214 South State
115 South University No Charge for Delivery
703 Packard Br t er s
113 East Liberty * Service
701 South State ___
(Corner State and Monroe)

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