100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 22, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ns

--

Tom
Kay

AT ThE MAJESTIC
DOUlBLE FEATURE
"GIRL WIThOUT A ROOM"
............... ...Charles Farrell
...............Marguerite Churchill

stay in college it is an overwhelming injustic<
to exact toll from rich and poor alike. Becaus
the poor can not utilize the Union to any great
degree without the spending of money he doet
not have. Only when equality of income is es-
tablished, and only then. can equality of expendi-
ture be morally demanded !
-Thomas M. Brown, Grad.
Musical Events
DETROIT SYMPHONY CONCERT
In Review

ViI

Mr. Brock ............. Charles Ruggles
**A MAN'S CASTLE"
Bill...................Specer Tracy
Ti ma.................. Lore ctta Young

E
S
,

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by thec Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
3JociiAtcd I o e i
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispathes credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rat of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General,
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.,
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925F
MANAGING EDITOR ..........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CITY EDITOR....................BRACKLEY SHAW
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............C. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR..................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
DRAMA EDITOR .....................JOHN W. PRITCHARD
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, John C. Healey, George Van Veck, Guy M.
Whipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie
Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Ogden G. Dwight,
Paul J. Elliott, Courtney A. Evans, Thomas E. Groehn,
John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Richard E. Larch, David
G. Macdonald, Joel P. Newman, Kenneth Parker, Wil-
iam R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch, Robert J. St. Clair,
Arthur S. Settle, Marshall D. Silverman, Arthur M.
Taub.
Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Marie
Heid, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean,
Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Kathryn
Rietdyk, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER.........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.................
.......................... CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-
mer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Florez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonds.

The Majestic presents a program this week that
would be a great deal better if it were not given
all in one dose. The first picture, "Girl Without
a Room," has a rather gay touch, having the
Latin quarter of Paris for its setting. Since Hol-
lywood has only one or two ways of handling a
Bohemian life picture, and even fewer plots for
such an attempt, this one offers nothing new and
different in this phase of entertainment. How-
ever, "A Man's Castle" is a little more interest-'
ing because its old, hashed-over plot has an un-
usual disguise, and Loretta Young is in it. Her
charm would pull almost any picture out of the
doldrums. And for the ladies there is Spencer
Tracy's sex appeal.
Charles Farrell, who always seems to resemble
a smooth-haired fox tel ier of some sort, awakens
one morning in Tennessee to find that his pic-
ture, "The Thorn," has won him a scholarship
to study in Paris. He immediately packs his
straw suitcase, sails for the Latin Quarter, and
there meets "The Girl Without a Room." He is
timid and dumb; she is wise and needs some-
thing to freshen her up a bit. They consequently
fall in love, and he goes through the usual night
club life with a siren who wants his money before
he gets wire and realizes that "The Girl Without
a Room" shoyld share his studio for a long time
to come. Charles Ruggles with his morning-after
jitters is in it, and the most amusing thing he
does is to get himself mixed up in a duel which
matures into a good comedy scene.
The castle in "A Man's Castle" is no more than
a shanty in the New York tramp residential sec-
tion. The man is Spencer Tracy, and his role is
no more than that of a tramp with a wanderlust
that seems incurable until another tramp, played
by Loretta Young, comes along and cooks her way
into his heart. This picture has very good mo-
ments, and the hero gets himself into some sit-
uations that are entertaining enough to make the
audience forget the parts of the picture that make
one squirm in his seat.
If you can stick it out for two and three-quar-
ter hours, and if you are not looking for too
much, this program should entertain you fairly
well. The news reel and the announcement of
"Eskimo" (including that catchy little advertise-
ment - wife traders - that always accompanies
the title) are the only added features that can be
crowded into this already bulging program.
-C. B. C.
Caimpus Opinion,

The majority rules in this world. Last night the
majority of the audience liked the concert, very
much. For them it was pieasurable and delightful.
More power to them. For actually it was a nice
concert, performed with tonal plenitude, r"hythmic
fluctuation, and with climaxes carefully worked
out, The brasses were sonorous and well-balanced;
they were used to advantage in each item of the
program, from the brass choir on the Choral in
the Zemachson Choral and Fugue, on through the
Rachmaninoff and of course in the familiar Wag-
ner excerpts. The strings came across with edge
and nuance. In itself, somewhat wearing in its
length and, almost conscious adoption of the lyric
manner, the Rachmaninoff was completely read;
the Wagner, The Prelude and Love Death, The
Ride of The Valkyrie, and the Overture to Tann-
hauser, sounding out sincere and strong, a little
rubato, were well received. As a kindly gesture,
Gabrilowitsch played as an encore, eagerly de-
manded, the March Slav, in recognition of re-
quests from students for it, both last year after
the concert and before this one. And that con-
cluded a program, easy to listen to, full of melody,
Gand well-loved.

The bickering and chittering minority of the
audience who always must have something to say,
felt that the potentialities of the orchestra were
larger than the results. That is, the program
verged on the trite, in view of the many times
that these things have been done, and in view
of what little symphonic meat there is available
in three symphony programs during a season, and
in view of the fact that this is a University au-
dience. The level of interest, too, was hardly
varied, since from the beginning to the end, there
was a continual richness, blandness, an emotional
gravy not quite reached in the Rachmaninoff,
perhaps, but decidedly present in the Wagner.
But, as I say, these comments are only for and
by the hyper-critical audience. -Sally Place.
SWIFT ENTERTAINMENT:
"SEE NAPLES AND DIE"
By JOHN W. PRITCHARDI
W ITH the colorful background of a Neopolitan
landscape, upon the terrace of a small inn
peopled by a cosmopolitan group of hilariously
funny characters, Elmer Rice is so good as to fur-
nish a play whose dialogue, while swift and funny
enough to stand by itself, is dependent upon an
interesting plot whose development is in evi-
dence all during the opus. This is "See Naples
and Die," which Play Production will offer Ann
Arbor play-goers tonight at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
It is not a terribly involved plot, but it never-
theless offers high dramatic possibilities. The
latter are thoroughly exploited by Mr. Rice: not
content with presenting average comedy of man-
ners which glisters but has little depth or scope,
he combines plot, lines, and excellent character
studies in order to extort chuckles from the audi-
ence. He does more than that, in fact: he inserts
a restrained sort of pathos here and there that
is subtle, yet pronounced enough to make humor-
ous moments more lofty. And almost everything
that happens is credible: this is a virtue not pos-
sessed by "The Last of Mrs. Cheyney," for in-
stance.

l

NIGHT EDITOR: RALPH G. COULTER
Stanford's Wilbur
And aternaliSm, .
S TANFORD'S President Ray Lyman
Wilbur evidently didn't catch Pa-
ternalism during his brief visit last year in Ann
Arbor. From the coast we receive information
that President Wilbur granted a request for per-
mission for co-eds to visit men's dormitory rooms
during the recent Stanford Toyan Ball.
Everyone who thinks a man's home is his castle
and who believes in the sanctity of privacy will
applaud this move toward appreciation by a uni-
versity administration that students desire to be
treated like men and women.
President Wilbur is no experimenting neophyte.
Outstanding among the country's educators, he
has demonstrated a great versatility, capacity,
and knowledge of human psychology, as Dean of
Stanford's medical school, as Secretary of the In-
terior under Hoover, and as longtime (from 1916
on) holder of his present position.
College presidents, deans, and Common Coun-
cils will do well to ponder his recent gesture of
respect for students.

People
11 Decide.

Letters published in this column should not be con-
struied as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disrearded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less
than 300 words if possible.
EASY MONEY AND
THE UNION FEE
To the Editor:
At times when money is passing freely from
the hands of employed to employer (that's the
order advocated by the New Deal), financing plans
are completed with a minimum of immediate dif-
ficulty. At such a time, about 1914-17, the Mich-
igan Union was conceived. Actual construction,.
however, was overtaken by the high prices of our
own war years and the completed cost, over $900,-
000 (swimming pool and library omitted) was far
greater than that originally contemplated. With
the laying of the last brick an indebtedness of
outrageous proportions had been saddled upon
incoming generations of freshmen.
But there was a great building set up, bringing
with it the element of fixity which is the basis
of innumerable intelligent and insidious attempts
at mass control. In the face of a 'fait accompli'
the opposition was powerless to do otherwise than
accept the necessity of paying the c a r r y i n g
charges. Fixed though the building was, the debt,
alas, was not fixed but thriving on a ration of
compound interest so staggering that the men of
1920-21 lost their enthusiasm for supplying the
goutish diet to a monster which consumed dollars
as rapidly in hard times as in easy years.
Sensing the possibilities of the historic period
of easy money from1926 to 1929 the regents in-
creased the Union membership fee to $10, stipu-
lating that $5 was to go to capital account. So
the saddle of debt was cinched so tightly upon
the future that there was no escape. But part
of what was once the future is already past.
Money is come upon difficult times and is so hard
to get that the Legislature cancelled the remain-
ing indebtedness of the Union, about $260,000, last
fall. Rationally one would expect the benefits
of this act to accrue to the contributing students.
Eut the fee has not been reduced! If I am asked
'Why?' I can only refer once more to the idea
of fixity. Voluntary change on the part of those
responsible for the original fixation is hardly to
be expected; hence, if we wish to change this
condition agitation is necessary.
It is my purpose to work not only for a reduc-
tion in the amount of the fee but also to strive
to place the membership of the Union on an en-
tirely voluntary basis. Strangely enough we could
here seize advantage of the very fixity which binds
us. The building exists, free from debt! Our
patronage is needed. It will be a white elephant,
rapidly becoming pink, if we as students refuse
to 'come through' as we have in the past. Our
first step is to refuse to pay again the indebted-
ness which was swept out by the undertow fol-
lowing the wave of 1929! Force the Union to
operate upon a voluntary membership and we will
discover prices being reduced in order that it will
be desirable for all men to willingly become con-
tributing members. Such an undertaking would
be a laudable endeavor on the part of a paper rep-
resenting the students and which gave three front

'.I

'
i
i
9
I

k

ASIT IS

w icran, aiy
Classified Ads

NEW FILM

JUST RELEASED
By and With

JULIAN RYAN
Speaking in Persom
AMERICA'S DARING PHOTOGRAPHER-LECTURER
DIRECT from CROWDED THEATRES
in NEW YORK and CHKfCAGO
CHICAGO DAILY NEWS: "Chicago has never seen a more
comprehensive and unbiased survey."
The CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR {Boston): "Mr. ?3ryan
talks like neither a tourist nor a travel eccturer, but as a man
impelled by interest in his subject to record and share it with
others. There was neither prejudice nor propaganda, but
human people swarmed the film, with almiost breath-taking
realism. No one should miss the opportunity for vivid en-
lightenment on an awakened country which he gives."
THEMOTION PICTURE YOU HAVE
WA ITED 16 YEARS TO SEE
Julien Bryan (Princeton, '21) has just returned from his fourth
extensive visit to U.S.S.R., bringing 15,000 feet of exciting and
authentic new motion pictures showing a cross-section of Soviet
life as it is at this very moment.
Prices 25c - c - 50c
Box Office Opens at Noon Tornorrow
Sponsored by the Hindustan Club, University of Michigan

HILL AUDITORIUM

What Have We Recognized?

"VI

at 8 P. M.

See and Hear the Truth

I

The reading of the play thus was sufficient to
make me eager for tonight to make its advent.
Yet there was an element which worried me. I
read a production copy, and was able to study
the cuttings. They are atrocious. Although I
have no definite data on this point, I do not sup-
pose that this can be blamed on Play Production:
the group probably was required to cut such lines
as were considered salacious by the powers that
be. But there are a number of points about such
censorship which require discussion, and upon
which I shall have more to say in the immediate
future.

I T has been the pleasant task of
The Daily to announce the suc-
ss of Citizens' Charter Amendment Repeal Com-
ittee in its drive to bring the East of -Division
eer question before the people. Through the
immittee's efforts the voters of Ann Arbor will
>w be able to decide directly whether or not
ographical discrimination is to be exercised by
ie Common Council in granting licenses to sell
e beverages of low alcoholic content.
The drive has disproved many of the arguments
the dry members of the Council. For one
zing, it has shown that the sentiment of the
eponderant majority of the faculty is against
Ze Division Street ruling: nine-tenths of thej
culty men who were contacted signed.
The reception of the committee's representa-
ves in the Seventh Ward indicated that Profes-
r Sadler's poll of last year was not representa-
ve. Professor Sadler claimed there was a three
one majority in favor of the ordinance, yet an
verwhelming majority of those residents of the
eventh Ward who were approached for signa-
ires readily gave them. One worker, by way of
xample, received 85 signatures from the 88 people
e visited.
The battle, of course, has only begun. But it
as at least been removed from the small arena
the Council chamber, where less than ten men
>uld with effrontery quash the most vigorously
>iced request of the people. The Daily believes
iat this will prove to be a long step tov ard ulti-
late victory.

11

By a great stroke of luck, the censorship does
not badly mutilate the context of the play. One
minor (although originally quite delightful) char-
acter is obliterated, and another more important
character is malformed: also, the motivation of
the plot, under the censored form, brings a hint
of incredulity. This, of course, is sufficient to
condemn the cutting, but not the production. The
bulk of Mr. Rice's delightful wit is left intact
(chiefly because most of it is irreproachably vir-
ginal), and thus the. performance is likely to be
at least as amusing as any strictly comic piece
that Play Production has presented this season.

i

Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
English prof at the University of Mary-
land: "This examination will be conducted
strictly on the honor system; please sit four
seats apart."

6
I

6
I

our Daily Offers: Fact No. I
THE MICHIGAN DAILY IS PRINTED ON A DUPLEX MODEL E
FLAT BED PRESS, THE MAXIMUM SPEED OF WHICH IS 6,000
EIGHT-PAGE PAPERS PER HOUR, PRINTED, FOLDED AND CUT.
K The Daily has one of the largest and most niodern printing plants of any
college newspaper in the country. The latest style types are employed, and
only the most modern, efficient equipment is maintained. :,The mechani-
cal department has a staff of eight highly trained technicians, who work full
time in the production of the paper. A fine physical plant is one of the
factors responsible for bringing you a modern quality daily newspaper.

Leoir-Ryne college has reserved a column in
their paper for lonely hearts, where lonesome co-
eds may advertise their plight in the hope that
some young Romeo will come along.

1 vi, T" a

University of Minnesota has a rival for an
honor that once belonged to Raleigh College. They
report a freshman who has been going to their
institution for the past 13 years.

Student Publications Building Phone 2-1214
(Watch for Future Notes on The Daily)

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan