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May 29, 1934 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1933-34 Debating

Teas sOf Sigma Rho Tau

Back row, left to right: H. W. Campbell, W. G. Pierce, O. W. Steph-
enson, Jr., M. B. Hieman, W H. Jewell, F. W. Donovan, G. W. Malone,
L. M. Reading, R. A. Lowe.
Front row, left to right: S. Sommer, A. J. Stone, S. M. Ferman, J. D.
O'Brian, A. E. Cleveland, R. L. Gillilan.
Employment Guidance Program
Aids Many Students And Alumni
By SHELDON M. ELLIS tain profession. He was obliged to
Hundreds of students and alumni work his way through school and soon
have been aided during the past year became ill. The Health Service found
by the guidance program offered by that he was suffering from a chroni
the University Bureau of Appoint- heart trouble which made it impos-
ments and Occupational Information sible for him to practice his chosen
under the direction of Dr. T. Luther profession after graduation and he
Purdom and Miss Gertrude M. Mux- was referred to the Bureau's guidance
en. department for help in selecting an-
The field of the Bureau's guidance other career.
program covers a wide range of work In dealing with a guidance case,
and is divided into two main cate- account is taken of the student's
gories: first, the educational guid- score in the freshman tests, his grades
ance, having to do with all types of to date in college subjects, and all
information, both general and spe- the information that can be obtained
cific; second, the vocational guidance concerning his history. He my be
and personal adjustment division, given a personality, or a vocational
dealing to a larger extent with the interest or a vocabulary test, or other
scientific side of guidance and the examinations. He is put through a
relation of a person's fitness to the series of exercises designed to show
various professions his ability to express himself in writ-
Information concerning almost ing and the extent to which he has
every imaginable situation is offered thought analytically about himself.
a large number of students and Often the counselor confers with the
alumni who look to the Bureau for professors who know the student best
aid. In the educational field, for ex- in order to obtain incidents that indi-
ample, students are informed as to cate behavior patterns.
the opportunities in teaching; the In the light of this information, the
specific type of training most likely to student is led to consider himself in
help one secure a position; what relation to the opportunities and re-
schools, private and otherwise, are on quirements of a few occupations that
a good financial basis; what steps interest him most, and in relation to
are best taken toward a particular those professions which the vocational
goal and all other information pos- tests substantiate.,
sible. Co-operates With Other Schools
Types That Are Aided The Bureau maintains contacts with
Individuals who require a great deal units doing guidance and adjustment
of time and frequent interviews, are work in other leading universities, and
placed in the vocational guidance and the methods and techniques employed
personal adjustment division. There by these bureaus are studied for sug-
are various types of individuals with gestions. The Bureau also assists high
which the Bureau deals: those who schools and colleges in Michigan in
come on their own volition for help establishing a guidance and personnel
with their vocational and personal program.
problems; and those sent by the
Health Service, by individual faculty DANZIG RADICALS BANNED
members or former teachers in high FREE CITY of DANZIG, May 28.-
schools. In many instances alumni (') - The chief of police today order-
have brought their sons and daugh- ed the dissolution and the suppression
ters to the guidance division of the of the Danzig Communist party.
Bureau. __
Many individuals are carefully .oNTunU TrJr.D i
studied each year in different types0SA-
of work. At the present time, atten-
tion is being given to a group of eight
freshmen from the upper quarter of_______De
the class, as shown by the tests taken
at entrance, who were placed on the
warning list at the end of the first
semester. Often students who wish to
transfer from one school or college
to another come to the Bureau for
counsel at the suggestion of the dean
or others. Special effort is made to
help those who fail to find a place Starting Wednesday "MOO
where they can succeed.
Faces Complex Problems
Occasionally the Bureau is con-
fronted with a very complex problem Ldia M E N D
in vocational guidance. One case to
which the guidance department is ADDED MATIN
now giving its attention concerns a bs ie O IH
freshman who entered the University Last Times TONIGHT
with the idea of preparing for a cer- The Biggest Hit the F

i
i
Y
.
Ii
l

Local Rule For
Codes Ordered
By Roosevelt
Only Service Industries To
Be Affected By New Re-
covery Policy.
WASHINGTON, May 28.- (P) -
The NRA's burden was lightened
measurably today by a Presidential
order setting up a local self-govern-
ment rule for many of the coded
service industries.
The order created a new recovery
administration policy. It suspended
price-fixing and other provisions of
codes for certain of the service in-
dustries as may be designated by the
NRA. The hour and wage and other
clauses were left intact. Hugh S.
Johnson, NRA administrator, will
decide which industries would be af-
fected.
The service industries, those sell-
Eng services rather than goods, in-
-lude hotels, restaurants, barber
shops, laundries, and cleaning and
dyeing plants.
It was indicated this change of
policy probably would be a fre-run-
ner of other clarifications and shifts
in the NRA program.
In a statement accompanying his
latestaexecutive order, theyPresident
pointed out that while some indus-
tries could operate efficiently under
a national code there were others "to
which a greater degree of autonomous
local self-government is desired."
Leverett Leads
Geoloiists In
Aniual Outing
Led by Dr. Frank Leverett of the
geology department, the Michigan
Academy of Science held its annual
geology field trip, the largest in its
history, in the lower peninsula of
the state, Saturday, May 26.
Making the trip were Prof. W. H.
Hobbs, R. C. Hussey, and Dr. Lev-
erett of the geology department here,
and A. D. Smith, director of the State
Gecgraphical Survey, in addition to
members of the teaching staffs of
Michigan State College, Ohio State
University, and Wayne University.
Examinations of a buried peat de-
posit which formed Lake Algon-
quin 10,000 years ago, of several old
channels of glacial rivers which were
outlets of Lake Huron when it drained
across to Lake Michigan, and of de-
posits of an even more ancient nature
were made on the trip. Partially con-
clusive evidence that the climate of
Michigan was almost the same 10,000
years ago as it is today were found.
Hemlock cones at the southern ex-
tremity of the hemlock limit, and a
sycamore log at the northern syca-
more limit, both in remarkable states
of preservation for the ages through
which they have passed, were re-
garded as proof of Michigan's stable
climate.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Phone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
Classified Advertising Department.
[he classified columns close at rive
o'clock previous to day of insertions.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in Advance-le per reading line
(on basis of fives average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
l0c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone Rate-15c per reading line for
one or two insertions.
E .14c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By Contract, per line-2 lines daily, one
month................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months......3c
2 lines daily, college year......7c
4 lines E. 0. D., college year .... c
100 lines used as desired ......9c
300 lixnes used as desired........8c
1.040~ lines used as desired...7c
2.000 lines used as desired...6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch of
7%,a point Ionic type, upper bid lower
case. Add 6c per iine to above rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10 per line to above rates for
bold face capital letters.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE at once, six-piece maple
dinettesuite. Perfect condition.
Small tables, bookcase, curtains,
large mirror, glassware, lamps, vio-
lin, saxophone, etc. Leaving town.
Apartment 404, 715 Forest. 488
LAUNDRY
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the ?aundry
problem of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. 2-3478, 5594,
611 E. Hoover. 9x
UAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Gas station, rustic store,
and three overnight cabins on Pic-
tured Rocks Trail where hundreds
of cars pass daily. A good proposi-
tion for two college students. Write
Wahkonsa Hotel, Munising, Mich.
481
LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING apartments
-large airy rooms, suitable for in-
structor and wife, 555 Packard at
Hill. 6389
487
WANTED
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 5x
WANTED: Used clothing. Best prices
paid for 'men's glothes and shoes.
Phone 3317. I Friedman. 468
SIGMA DELTA CHI MEETS TODAY
A luncheon meeting of Sigma Delta
Chi is scheduled for noon today at
the Union, at which all members are
to be present to discuss plans for the
coming initiation..
At this meeting the records of the
local chagter will be reviewed before
sending copies to Chicago to replace
the records of the national organ-
ization, which lost a great part of its
records in the late Chicago fire.

Bright Spot
802 Packard Street
LUNCHEON 20c, 25c, 30c
11:30 toj:30,
DINNEDR. . 30c, 35c, 40c
6:15 to 7:45
YOU'LL BE SURPRISED

11

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,

Yori p;r ~-
Tri__

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our

T Tri Fo
N The Fair

H

o m e

This Saving Goes DOUBLE I
THE DEPRESSION may be over, but we'll bet that a few extra dollars won't
be hard to take. Here's how you can save them! Make the trip home by
Greyhound. join the thousands of wide-awake college students who make the
most of Greyhound's low fares. You'll travel first class-in modern, comfortable
coaches, with soft-cushioned, reclining chairs, wide windows.
Greyhound's service to the Chicago World's Fair isespecially attractive. Inquire
at the local depot, or ask your Greyhound student representative about convenient
Expense Paid Tours, saving time and money, both on the trip and at Chicago,.
CAMPUS AGENTS
MICHIGAN UNION PARROT RESTAURANT
John Bollock Phone 4151 338 South State Phone 4636

'I

lb

t
i

ELSSOHN Theatre
EE TODAY at 3:15!
and TOMORROW MAT.
'estivals Have Ever Known
LTER Dorothy
dZAK VERNON

__ .
i _ W

1SOCIAL.
ANCING
Toe, tap, acrobatics.
Taught daily. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
TheatreBldg.sPh. 9695
_' Open evenings.

Olive WA
OLSEN SLE

in
"Miss Olsen stops the show!"- Detroit FREE PRESS.
Opening TOMORROW NIGHT: SELENA ROYLE and
ROLLO PETERS in the current New York success: "THE
SHINING HOUR"
Matinees 50c, 75c - Evenings 75c, $1.00, $1.50

THE JOHN MARSHALL
LAW SCHOOL
Thirty-fifth Year - An Accredited Law School
Evening Law School with Day School Standards
COURSES LEAD TO LL.B. AND J.D. DEGREES
Text and Case Method Moot Court Practice

11

y e r
Ends kA CICEnds
-Tonight IMuIJ U I -Tonight
The Greatest Jungle Picture!! JOHNNY
vWEI$$MU LLE
ftuHt INJIiAW

r.r r. rm eir..a 2rrr r r

GEORGE F. ANDERSON ROBERT McMURDY
(LL.B., N. W. University) (LL.M., U. of Michigan)
ARTHUR M. BARNHART THOMAS J. NORTON
(A.B., Princeton; LL.B., Harvard) (LL.D., Knox College; LL.B., Kas.)
HERBERT BEBB LLOYD D. HETH
(A.B., U. of Ill.; J.D., U. of Chicago) (A.B., Beloit College)
CHARLES CENTER CASE NOBLE W. LEE
(LL.B., N. W. University) (A.B., Harvard)
MORTON S. CRESSY ELBRIDGE BANCROFT PIERCE
(A.B., Yale; LL.B., Harvard) (A.B., Amherst; LL.B., Harvard)
WALTER F. DODD HON. GEORGE FRED RUSH
(Ph.D., U. of Chicago) (A.M., U. of Michigan)
PALMER D. EDMUNDS LEWIS A. STEBBINS

II

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