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May 15, 1934 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETINI

L,

PIl1catloll it] the lBullrn i~colietrucWIlve notlce to F 1al ettler. G t116
Univrsity. (Copy reccelvad t the offlce ort tbeAssL-:ant to the Pft-t enL 'U~III
3 :3u; 11 ;:O3u n. aturuay.

TUESDAY, MAY 15. 1934
VOL. XLIV No. 163t
N(oLices
Notice to Seniors, Graduate Stu-
dents: Diploma fees payable now,
Early settlement is necessary for the
preparation of diplomas. Il no case
will the University confer a degree at
Commencement upon any student
who fails to pay his fee before 4 o'-
clock Wednesday, May 23.
In case the Faculty does not recom-
mend any payor, the fee will be re-
funded on surrender of receipt for1
payment.
The above applies also to fees for1
all special certificates.
Candidates for degrees or certifi-
cates should at once fill out card at
office of the Secretary of their own
college or school, pay the cashier* of
the University, have card receipted,
and file indicated section of this re-
ceipted card with the Secretary of
their own college or school. (Stu-
dents enrolled in the Literary Col-
lege, College of Architecture, School
of Music, School of Education, and
School of Forestry and Conservation
please note that blank forms should
be obtained and receipted cards filed
in the Recorder's Office, Roon 4,
University Hall.)
Please do not delay until the last
day, but attend to this matter at once.
We must letter, sign, and seal ap-
proximately 2,000 diplomas and cer-
tificates, and we shall be greatly
helped in this work by early payment
of the fee and the resulting longer
period of preparation.
Shirley W. Smith
*The Cashier's Office is closed on
Saturday afternoons .
Procedure in Case of Articles Sto-
lert or Missin g: Notice should be giv-
en at the Business .Office, Room 3,
University Hall, with the utmost
promptness whenever any article,
whether owned privately or by the
aistitution, disappears under circum-
stances which idicate theft. A
Shirley W. Smith
Special Faculty Meeting, College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts: The
Faculty will meet in Room 1025, An-
gell Hall, Tuesday, May 15, at 4:10
o'clock, for the consideration of the
Special Order on Entrance Require-
ments. Because of the importance
of this special order, every member of
the Faculty is urged to be present.
Faculty, College of Engineering:
There will be an important meet-
ing of the Faculty of this College on
Wednesday, May 16, at 4:15 p.m. in
Room 348, West Engineering Build-
ing. The special order of this meet-
ing will be the consideration of com-
bined courses in Forestry and Busi,
ness Administration; the revision of
Faculty Rules; and a report from the
Committee on Nonteclnical Elec-
tives.

sort will be held in the auditorium of
the University High School on Sat-
urday, May 19, at 8 o'clock sharp,
(The examination will not be given
also i the afternoon as was prev-
iously announced). No other qualify-
ing examination will he held until
Saturday, September 22.

Bus. Adm. 122 Tue. a.m. June 5
B;us. Admi. 152 Sat. p.m. June 2
"Pli ote that Bus. Adfi. 122,
Tie. a.m., June 5, was incorrectly
rminted June 4 in May 5 Daily) .
Exa iination hours -a.m. 9 to 12;
p.m. 2 to 5: Any class not included
in the above schedule may be exam-
ined at any time on which the in-
structor and the class concerned may
agree.
Each student taking practical work
in music in the School of Music will
be civen an individual examination.
All such students should report to
the office of the Director of Music,
and sign up, on blanks now available
thfre, for a specified examination
period.
Regular class work will continue'
until Friday night, June 1.
'his notice will appear three times
only, May 6, May 18, and June 1.
Please preserve, as no fftprints will'

Teachrc~'s Cetificate Examinaton:
All candidats. for the Teacher's Cer-
Wficate (except graduate stuidents
who will have received an adV iced
degree by June) must pass a Com-
prehenve ExarinAtion in BLd uca-
tion. The next examination of ts
kid will b! held in the auditorium
of the University fligh School on Sat-
urdlay morning, May 19, at 9 o'cock
'harp. (Students having conffli t
will take h( exanin0tion at 2 o'-
clock on the same day) The examn-
iniatipn will cover the work of Edu -
cation Al (or A25), B20, 1, bioo
andi special methods. Students en
rolled in any of the special curricula
in The School of Education will b
examined on the Education courses
covered in those curricula. Studenth
desiring to take the examination ii
Wie afternoon must leave their names
with the Recorder of the School of
Education, 1437 U.E.S .

'
{
7

Senior Engineers: The cl' a, picture
is being made ;p lthis week, To be
included yoi musi, pay your dues his
week.
Graduating Mecutanicai En'zeers:
.ir. Z. 13. Freeann of the Scott Paper
Company, Chester, Pern., will. be in
!Room 221 V;est Engineerig Build-
iu; on Wedesday and ilThliursday,
1fay i6 and 17, for the purpose of
dierviewing aiypne interested in em
>loymelnt with this company.
HWwse Show: Men and women stu-
Oents wishing to take part in the
florse Show on Saturday, May 39, at
i,:30 o'clock are asked 10 get in touch
with Jane Brucker <telephone 23203)
A 1933-34 medi(al (ard is necessary
for all entrants.
Life Saving Class for Women:
Members of the class who wish to go
to Ypsilanti for the Examiners Tests
on Tuesday and ,Wednesday, are
asked to meet at 6:30 at Barbour
, xymnnasinm.
Academic Notices
Final Examination Schedule, Tune
1934: College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts; School of Education;
School of Music; School of Forestry
and Conservation; College of Phar-I
macy; School of Business Adminis-
tration; and Graduate School.
Each course in the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts and in
the School of Music has been given a
group letter for e>: amiination pur-
poses. Many courses aJpearing in the
announcement of the Graduate

Reading Examinations in French:
Cand idates for the degree of Ph.D.
in the departments listed below who
wish to satisfy the requirement of a
reading knowledge during the current
academic year, 1933-34, are informed
that examinations will be offered in
Room 108, Romance Language Build-
ing, from 9 to 12, on the following
Saturday mornings, May 26 and Aug-
ust 4. Under exceptional circum-
stances, individual examinations may
be given at other times. It will be
necessary, in each case, to register at
the office of the Department of Ro-
mance Languages (112 R.L.) at least
one week in advance.
It is desirable that candidates for
te doctorate prepare to satisfy this
requirement at the earliest possible
date. A brief statement of the na-
ture of the requirement, which will
be found helpful, may be obtained at
the office of the Department, and
further inquiries may be addressed to
Mr. L. F. Dow (100 R.L., Wednes-
days at 2).
Master's Degrees in History: Stu-
dents who are candidates for the
Master's Degree in History may take
the language examination Friday,
May 25, at 4 p.m., in Room T3, Haven
To Graduate Students in Educa-
tion: The preliminary examinations
for the doctor's degree in Education
will be held on May 24, 25, and 26.
All students planning to take these
examinations should notify Dr.
Woody's Office, Room 4000, University
High School.

ious luncheon clubs are cordially in-
vited to be present at this meeting.
Senior Ball Coninittee Meeting:
at 7:30 p.m., Union.
Faculty Women's Group: The Bib-
liophiles will meet at 2:30 at the
home of Mrs. David Mattern, Dover
Road.
Michigan Dames meeting at 8:00
p.m., Michigan League. Last geneiral
meeting. All members are irged to
be present.-
Coig n Events
Chemistry Colloquium: Meeting
will be held in room 303 at 4:15 p.m.,
Wednesday, May 16. Mr. C. K. Hunt
and Mr. J. H. Truesdail will give
talks on:
"Quinoidation of Triarylmethyl
.a ilides. The Reaction of Tiaryl -
methyl Halides with Phenyl Magne-
sim Broimide."
Research Club will meet in room
2528 East Medical Building on Wed-
nesday, May 16, at 8:00 p.m. The
following papers will be presented:
"The Recapture of Excess Earn-
ings: A Discarded Experiment in
Railroad Control," by Professor I. L.
Sharfnian.
"A Study in Multiple Taxation," by
Dean Henry M. Bates.
Sigma Rho Tai: Last regular meet-
ing of the year tomorrow at 7:45 in
the Union. Prize contest in Hall of
Fame speaking. Elections of officers
for next year, announcements of
promotions to higher rank, and final
announcements for Tung Oil ban-
quet, Due to the special importance of
this meeting, the presence of every
member is expected.
Student Economics Club: Meet-
ing on May 16 at 8 o'clock at the
Union to discuss "Recent Banking
Legislation."

Noti d Chemist
To Confer With
PharmaeyMe
. .
Dr. Lyman F. Small, Heat]
Of Search For 1orphiiw
Sitltitute, Coine Here
Dr. Lyman F. Small, one of the,
leading American chemists, andi heal
of the search for a non-addicting
morphine substitute sponsored by the
Rockefeller Foundation will confer
here Thursday with members of the
pharmacology department and rep-
resentatives of the drug addiction
committ e of the National Research
Council, on th c experiments con-
ducted tihs far in tue dlrug investi
gatioll.
Four years ago, after experiment-
ing for a short time in search of a
non-habit forming substitute, the
Federal Bureau of Social Hygiene
turned the problem over to the Na-
tional Research Council. The coun-
cil sent to Vienna, where Dr. Small
was studying.
For the last three years, in his lab-
oratories at tile Umversity of Vir-
ginia, he has sought to find com-
pounds as closely allied with mor-
phine, chemically, as possible. He
has sent about 225 of them here to
the pharmacological laboratories,
headed by Dr. C. W. Edmunds and
Dr. N. B. Eddy. Certain of the com-
pounds, ir. Ednmuds pointed out in
an interview yesterday, possess prop-
erties which seem to indicate their
having the necessary, requirements,
but, he added, the addicting qualities
"will have to be settled later by clini-
cal investigation."
Dr. Small will also speak Thursday
before a closed meeting of chemistry
graduate students on "The Chemis-
try of Morphine."
C. Of C. Moves
To License City
Ad So0ijitato'n

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
P'hone 2-1214. Place adverti fem ents with
Cias',Iled Advertisins Dtepartment.
Tire classfied ColUrrmIS clNse at five
o'clock previous to day ofInsertions.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
etra charige.
Cash In Advance-11c per reading line
(on ba,:):: of flvty average words to j
line) for ogre or two Insertions.I
10c per reading line for three or more
Insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone Rate-15c per reading line for
one, or two Insertions.
14c per reading line for three or more
insertion .
10% dlsdeount if paid within ten days
from the date o last insertion.
Minimum three ines per inertion.
By Con tract, per line- -2 linies daily, one
month .... ................ c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months .....:.C
2 lines daily, college year. 7c
4 lines E. 0. D., college year ... .7e
100 ines used asdesired......9c
1,0 lines ued as desired...... le
2,000 lines used as desired ......6c
The above rates 'are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch of
71 point Ionic type, upper and lowert
ease. Add tic per line to above rates for
all capitaliletters. Add 4coper line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10 per line to above rates for
bold fade capital letters.
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Cook for Northern Mich-
igan summer resort. June 23 to La-
bor Day, $25 per week. Give experi-
ence. 14500 Abington Rd., Detroit.
457
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Saturday afternoon in Hil
Auditorium pair of Parisian Opera
glasses in suede case. Finder please
call 4331. Reward. 459
LOST: Dark blue spring coat with
cape at, Sigma Chi party. Owner
went home with similar coat. Call
9710. 454
TAXICABS
ARCADE CAB. Dial 611"6. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates. 2x
UniersiyRear
Are Low For Year;
Total Near $86,000

PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problem of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. 2-3478, 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 9x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darred.
Careful work at low price, 4
WANTED
WANTED: Adjustable sketching easel
that will hold large canvases. See
Tracy - "Millers," 533 S. Main.
45f;
WANTED: Portable typewriter. Give
price and make. Box 49, Michigan
Daily. 458
WANTED: Canoe: Old town or equiv-
alent. Write giving price, equipment,
and description of canoe. J. B.
Spiers, 9510 Grand River, Detroit.
455
WANTED: Woman wishing to go to
Southern California after 'Univer-
sity closes would like to be a paying
passenger in automobile. Call Box
48, Mich. D.:aily. 453
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Arn Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 5x

LAUNDRY

Forestry Club: Final meeting of the
year Wednesday evening. Election of
officers for 1934-35. Report on Mich-
igan Forester, and final Treasurer's
5Itateinel)t. Field Day awards.
Sociedad Hispanica final meeting of
the year Wednesday evening at 7:30
in the Michigan League. A program
will be presented by various members
of the club, nominations for next
year's officers will be held, and re-
ireshments will be served. Everyone
is cordially invited to attend.
Polonia Literary Circle meets for
the' last time this year at 7:45 in the
League on Wednesday, May 16. All
members and friends of the Circlef
should be on hand to meet the incom-
ing adrninistration elected for the fol-
lowing year.

,;.

University Bureau of Appointments
& Occupational Information: The
Bureau has received notice of the
following U. S. Civil Service Exami-
nations:
Supervisory of Secondary Educa-
tion, Indian Field Service-$4,600.
Public Health Nursing Analyst -
$3,200..
Announcements are on file at the
office, 201 Mason Hall.
Choial Union Members: Members
of the University Choral Union are
requested to return their music books
to the office of the University School
of Music, Maynard Street, between
the hours of 10 and 12 and 1 and 4
daily, not later than Friday, May 18,
in order to receive back the deposit
of $2.50. After May 18, no refunds
will be made.
Graduate School: All graduate stu-
dents who expect to complete their
work for a degree at the close of the
present semester should call at the
office of the Graduate School, 1014
Angell Hall, to check their records
and to secure the proper blank to be
used in paying the diploma fee. The
fee mu.st be paid by May 23.
G. Carl Huber, Dean
Students of the Cllege of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts: A meet-
ing will be held in the Upper Amphi-
theatre of the Dental Building at
4:15 on Tuesday, May 15, for students
in the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts and others interested in
future work in Dentistry. The meet-
ing will be addressed by Dean M. L.
Ward of the School of Dentistry.
Students of ,i College or tijera-
ture, Science, and te Arts: A meet-
ing will be held in Room 1035 Angell
Hall at 4:1' on ''Vursday, May 17, for
students in the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts and others in-
terested in future work in Library Sci-
ence. The meeting will be addressed
by Librarian W. W. Bishop, head of
the Departmnen t of L 1ibrary Science.
Directed Teaching - Qualifying
Examination: No student will be ad-
riitteL to work i Directed Teaching
(Educatsion DlOy n or Dim) until he
hasl passised a Qu-alifying Examination

School carry
Group
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J
K
L
M
N
R
P
Q

these group letters also.
Date of Examination
Wed. a.m. June 6
Fri. a.m. June 8
Mon. a.m. June 4
Sat. a.m. June 2
Mon. am. June J11
Mon. p.m. June 11
Tue. a.i, June 12
true. p.m. June 12
Fri. p.m. June 8
Sat. am. June 9
Tue. p.m. June 5
Sat. p.m. June 2
Wed. p.m. June 6
Thu. a.m. June 7
Thu. p.m. June 7
Tue. a.m. June 5
Mon. p.m. June 4
Sat. p.n. June 9
Each course in Group

Events Today
Physics Colloquium: Professor Ray-
mond T. Birige, of the University of
California, will speak on "The Present
Status of the Values of e, h, and e-m"
at 2:15 p.m. in Room 1041, East
Physics Bldg. All interested are cor-
dially invited to attend.
Spteial Assenbly: There will be a
special assembly for students in edu-
cation in the University High School
Auditorium at 4:10. The program
will be presented by students in the
correlated Course in Education.
Professors Bromage and Dorr have
kindly agreed to meet with the gradu-
ate students in political science for
the purpose of informal discussion
at 7:30 p.m., room 319 in the Union.
Druids: There will be a meeting at
8 p.m. today in the Union.
Alpha No initiation will be held in
the Alpha Nu room, Angell Hall, 5:00
p.m. Initiation banquet will be held
at the Union at 6:15. Members de-
siring to make reservations may do
so by calling Frank Aldrich, 8472, or
William Groening, 4145, or Charles
Rogers, 4872.
Varsity Glee Club: Special rehear-
kal at the Union at 7:30 p.m.
Cer ele Francais: Important meet-
ing at 7:45 p.m. at the League. The
annual election of officer:; will be fol-
lowed by a card party. All members
are urged to be present.
Christian Science Organization:
Meeta at 8 o'clock this evening in
the Chapel of the Michigan League
hi ilding. All faculty and students
imOt reste'd are invited to attend.
Millet Players meeting at 7 p.m. to
elect officers for next year. It is ab-
soluitely necessary i hat everyone at-
tend.

Black Quill: Important
Wednesday, 8:3'0 p.m. All
are requiredi to attend.

U. of M. Outdoor Club: The clubc
is sponsoring a party Saturday at the
Sylvan Estates Country Club. The
main group will leave about 2 p.m.3
and spend the afternoon at golf, hik-
ing, baseball, and swimming as de-
sired. After dinner at the clubhouse;
there will be games and dancing the
remainder of the evening. Those
wishing to be present for dimner must
make reservations at Lane Hall and
leave a deposit of 25 cents in order,
to be assured a place. Approximate
total cost 65 cents.
Stalker hall:
Wednesday, 4:30, Devotions De-
par tmnent. All students urged to at-
tend.
5:30, Hike and outdoor supper,
weather permittinlg. Meet at hall.
All invited. Cost 15 cinits.
Band Concert: The Varsity Band,
under the direction of four student
:onductors, will present the first of
the series of spring concerts at 7:30
p.m. Wednesday on the bandstand in
the center of the Diagonal. Con-
certgcers are respectfully urged to
take copies of this program to the
soncert, as there will be no printed
programs. The co-operation of skat-
2rs in remaining away from the vicin-
ty of the bandstand durming the con-I
cart will be appreciated. The pro-!
;ram follows:
Keler-Bela: L:iustsliel overture; Bi-
.et: Carmen 1 selections);. Reissiger:
The Mill on the Cliff, overture; King:
overture, Princess of India; Safranek:
overture, Atlantis-- The Lost Conti-
nent. These numbers will be inter-
;ipersed with military marches.

meeting
members

A move by Ann Arbor retail mer-
chants to restrict undesirable ad-
vertising and solicitation was an-1
nounced yesterday by the Retail Mer-
chants division of tihe Chamber~ of
Commerce.
The agreement follows:
"We, the .undersigned, agree that
on and after this date, May 1, 1934,;
we will discontinue the purchase of
advertising space in programs, church
publications, group sign boards, fash-
ion sh.ows, etc., or the donation of
cash, ierchandize, or prizes to all
entertainments such as bazaars, pic-
nics, athletic meets, etc., unless passed;
upon and approved by a special com-
mittee of the Chamber of Commerce
which will issue a card to the solicitor
if the cause is considered profitable
advertising or of sufficient impor-
tance to justify solicitation of dona-
tions."
The action, taken as a result of an
increase in demands for donations
and advertising, will shift the trou-
blesome task of, investigating such
i'equests to a special committee, the
personnel of which will not be re-
vealed.
Professr* hobbs Is 'To
Atttic RQ,rf, Wieering-
P of., William 7I. Thob' of the ePe-
ology department will attelid the
Regional R.O.T.C. Confere de to be
held at Purdue Ulniversity on May
18 and 19. Professor hobbs, who is
chairman of the University Military
Affairs Committee, is going in place
of Lt. Col. Frederiik C. Rogers, com-
mandant of the local R.O.T.C. unit,
who is unable to attend.
WEgBSTER ARTiCLE APPEARS
Harvey C. Webster of the English
department is the author of an ar-
ticle, entitled "Facing Futility," which
appeared in the April number of the
Sewanee Review, literary and critical
periodical.
"Facing Futility" is a discussion of
the philosophy of Aldous Huxley, pop-
filar English author. Mr. Webster con-
cerns himself with each of the au-
thor's novels and the references made
to problems of human existence.

Repairs and maintenance of the
University's buildings and grounds
cost $86,740 last year, according to
figures issued yesterday by E. C. Par-
don, superintendent of the buildings
and grounds department. . .
This figure, Mr. Pardon said, is but
one-thud ,of the maximum two per
cent replacement value that the State
allows the University each year for
its repairs per building.. A survey
conducted by the department as to
the type of building which necessi-
tates the least number of repairs
shows that fireproof buildings are
cheapest in their repair costs which
amount to only .58 per cent, while
semi-fireproof buildings ai'e shown
to be the most expensive in their up-
keep.
Other statistics show that a total
of $98,620 was the cost of janitor serv-
ice, and $15,110 was spent for care
of the campus grotinds and hospi-
tal.
Dr. McKenizie to Teach
At Staiford in Sinim er
Dr. Roderick D. McKenzie, head
of the sociology department, and for-
merly of the University of Washing-
ton, willmreturn to the coast this sum-
mer to teach courses in Human Ecol-
ogy and in Population and Race Prob-
lein at. Stanford University.

Russian Star
Says Theatre
Has ImprToved
(Continued from Page 1)
Mendls~sohn Theatre. When asked
what she thought of this play, she
exclaimed :
"Oh! it is a classic! Fifty years
from now it will rank with Moliere.
It is marvelously constructed and
hangs together so beautifully; it is
not so much the play, the action, that
make it great; there is really ve y
little action, but the air, the atmo-
sphere, and, above all, the language,
make it very worth while., The play
has.been kept so beautifully in the
period of which Samuel Pepys wrote
in his diary, The man who wrote it is
a great scholar."
This gorgeously alive actress was
famous in Russia in the Imperial
Theatre at Moscow and St. Peters-
burgh. She was first trained in the
Royal Dramatic Academy in Mos-
cow and was later decorated for- her
artistry by the Czar. After the revo-
lution, her brother and first husband
killed by the Bolsheviki, she fled to
Paris and later came to the United
States. She first won the praise that
is hers in "Grand Hotel."
Garbo, said the critics, gave a pale
imitation of Leontovich in her ren-
dering of Grushinskaya, the dancer.
Last season she was starred in Ben
Hecbt's "'twentieth Century,"
Mine. Leontovich has never played
before a predominantly college audi-
ence. She is looking forward, she
says, to the experience.
"You know," she went on, "we can
play before any, crowd. If the people
cannot understand us now, in three
or .four yegrs they will grow in dis-
crimination until they can appreciate
good theatre. You see, so many of
them have existed for years on the
'leg-shows' of the movies. Now they
must become accustomed toj worth-
while drama and already they are
intensively interested."

I

X may be examined at
any time mutually
agreed upon by class
and instructor.
courses not carrying the let-

Other

ters will be
Classes

Mon.
Mon.
Mlon.
Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
Tue..
'i'ue.
Tue.
'Tue.
Tue.
Tue.
Tue.
Fur

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
1~1
1
2_
3

examined as follows:
Date of Examiintion
Wed. a.m. June 6
Fri. a.m. June 8
Mon. a.m. June 4
Sat. a.m. June 2
Mon. a.m. June 11
Mon. p.m. June 11
Tue. a.m. June 12
Tue. p.m. June 12
Fri. p.m. June 8
8at. a.m. June 9
'Tue. p.m. June 5
Sat. p.m. June 2
Wed. p.m. June G
Thu. a.m. June '7

While Dr. McKenzie was at the
University of Washington, he made
a survey of race relations on the Pa-
cic coast, his observation of racial
problems being based on a back-
ground of world travel. The study of
these race problems was made while
he was in the Orient.
Dr. McKenzie will leave the middle
of June and will teach until the end
of August.
If you grits, iwe bae it.#
Core rspondn e Stationery,
FnttA Pexs, Ink, etc.
S ters all kes.
t reeti* r r e boar,,
0 . D. M RU 0

21 si
i

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pp4;
1( ' " 1' G
c 4;y~~

314 " . to 19

St., An Arbr.

_ __,

Freshmen Luncheon Cl b:

The

final banquet
Union at 6:15.

will be held at the
All members of prev-

ii.

rther, the courses listed

below

__. _
__ .

A

_.
'8 ai MY is + u l a . -.- -.__ % i 115 di -

will be examined as follows:
Education Al Tue. a.m. June
Education B20 Thu. a.m. June'
Education Cl Mon. p.m. June
Bus. Adn. 102 Mon. p.m. June
:t -4--- : --

W

12
7
4
4

Th1ESIS PA R
Ro d 'eii 3rd Clss Tourist
I NCAi'.D..........14.50 $188.00
'-.............$17.0) $190.00
tusarANY r......... r161.e $200.00
ITALY.......$P2.50 $210.00
C ,.Ear classe., uoted frec..
'.ours and C vuisc4; a Ivertised anywbere.

ITNEY
Daily 1:30 to 11 P.M.
15c to 6 - 25c after 6
NOW
FIRST ANN ARBOR
SHOWING!
JOHN BOLES
GLORIA STUART
,, , 44

ENDS
TON IGHT

MAJESTIC

ENDS
TONIGHT

MICHI GAN
The 1934 Pulitzer Prize RIay - Now a Great
Picture, Winning the Acclaim of the Campus
MYRNALO

P%~~A~~ ~yi~fOQ.:
Of UA$"1jt' rnnVo -t~
n f -!C
..............~E 1A I~

17

11

IN
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