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May 10, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'HE

CHIGAN DAILY

nondescript delegates should be invited. Such a
monthly meeting would be pleasant and broaden-
ing, and would in all probability both encourage
the formulation of other worthwhile projects and
engender the spirit that would be necessary to
make them successful.
Screen Reflections

I

- V1.4,,~.

Puwished every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.

!1

$5tzia ,d 4 .rF
'- 1933 (uio u covEauc 1:34
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is mncusively entitled to the use
frr republicationofat rll news dispathos credited to it or
not otherwise credited inthil paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
.. dispatches Are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third A'.listant Postmaster-General.
Sbscrltion during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$150. Duing regulat school year by carrier, $3.75; by
-. mal, .$4M.".
Offices: Student Pub icatioys Building, Maynard Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-2A,.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives
Inc., 4C East Thirty-Fourth Street, New Yrk City; 8
Boyson Street, Boston ; h12 Nrth Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.'
EDiTRIAL STAFF
.Telephone 425"
MANAGING EDITOR .......THOMAS K. CONNELLAlat
CITY VDITOR...........BKACKLEY SAW
EDITORIALDIRE0:OR.... .....C. HART SCHAAfi
SPORTS 'EDITOR.................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.....................CAROL J. HANAN
ZIGHT EDITORS: A. Eis Bal, Ralph G. Coulter, William
. Ferris, John C, Healey, George Van Vleck, E. Jerome
l'ttit.-
SPORTS ASSISTANTS. Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSSTANTS: 4arjorie Beck, Eleanor Blun
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomas A. Groehn
John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
0. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch
Arthur S. Settle, Jacob C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub
Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider
BUSINESS STAFF
' elephone 2-l 14.
BUSINESS MANAGER ............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ........:...BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.....................
.............................. CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbardc, George Atherton.
:Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Florez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard. Betty Simondi.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt; Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avncr, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Levin, Willy Tmlinsen, Dean Aseelin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Hardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
NIGHT EDITOR: A. ELLIS BALL
A New In terfraterni ty
'Council
HE STORMY SESSION of the In-
terfraternity Council Tuesday night
brought to the surface an opinion which has been
forming in the minds of a number of those who
have worked with it through this and past years.
This opinion is that, as it now operates, the Inter-
fraternity Council is an inept, uninteresting, and
impotent organization.
No one who has attended many meetings of the
Council can question the validity of this criticism.
To wait regularly for periods of an hour or more
until a quorum can by dint of a great many tele-
phone pleas be assembled, to listen to intermediate
discussion of projects which never seem to fructify,
is to reach the point where other than an unfa-
vorably critical conclusion is impossible. It would
be a marvel that so many as seventeen votes were
cast at the meeting Tuesday for continuation of
the council, were it not for the conviction that
most of the seventeen voted either as inexperienced
delegates of a congenitally conservative bent, as
persons hopeful of the hollow spoils of office, or
as men who out of pride felt they had to defend
their handiwork.
Any consideration of the just criticism which
must be levelled at the Council as it has existed
points to the recommendation that the Council be
abolished; we agree with the decision of the ma-
jority in Tuesday's unofficial vote, which favored
radical change in the Council's set-up, i.e., the
substitution for it of a new body.
We believe that two factors are at the base of
the Council's unworthiness. It must be emphasized
in passing that neither of these concerns the offi-
cerial personnel that has functioned during the
current year. The two factors which we condemn
are first, the official connection of the University
with the Council, specifically through the Coun-

cil's Judiciary Committee; and second, the activ-
ities which the Council has deemed its proper
goals.
The first fault, the one which was most heavily
scored night before last, is luckily very easy to
overcome. The evil of University interference can
be cured, once and for all, by the simple expedient
of eliminating it. In whatever body takes the place
of the present council, that is, let there be no con-
nection, official or unofficial, direct or indirect, with
the faculty or administration of the University. We
are not at liberty to divulge names, but we wish
to tender the information that several persons
high in the administration believe that such a di-
vorce would be logical and healthy.
The second criticism is susceptible of more

AT THE WHITNEY
Double Feature
C "KING FOR A NIGHT"
Chester Morris Helen Twelvetrees
"King for a Night" is a picture with a punch
in it, being the story of a small town boy who
fights his way to the light heavyweight champion-
ship of the world. Executed with quite a good
amount of novelty and restraint, it has some gen-
uinely good moments for which it should be com-
mended. However, there are several weak spots
which reek of sentimentality and shades or trite-
ness that prevent its being as good as it could
have been. Chester Morris gives an admirable per-
formance in portraying an egotistical but sin-
cerely purposeful young man' whose success is his
tragedy. He is ably assisted by the blond Helen
Twelvetrees, who this time is not the sweetheart
but the little sister whose adoration of him
gets him into all sorts of trouble. Alice White
(remodeled nose and all) is cast as her usual self,
and she fits in quite well with the general trends of
the picture. "King for a Night" is slightly above
being mediocre, but is not far enough to be con-
sidered valuable entertainment.
E "CROSS STREETS"
John Mack Brown Claire Windsor
Anita Loos
If you miss the old days of the movies in which
college sentimentality and loose women were para-
mount in importance in the lives of old grads,
don't miss this rank, impossible, rottenly-executed
story of a drunken doctor who gives his all for
the happiness of the woman he once loved. In it
you will see the complete degradation of John
Mack Brown as an actor, the resurrection of Claire
Windsor as a leading lady of no worth whatever,
and the most awful direction you ever witnessed
in a moving picture. E represents extinct in this
case. -C.B.C.
Musical 'Events
-
TONIGHT'S FEATURES
Mischa Levitski, pianist
"The Seasons"
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock and Earl V. Moore,
Conductors.

FIRST CONCERT
In Review
THE FESTIVAL went off with fireworks last
night, with Rosa Ponselle, colorful, brilliant,
dramatic as she is, the chief display of the eve-
ning.
The arrangement of Stock's came as a surprise,
accustomed as we are to hearing Bach treated in a
conservative style, with no harp, no gong, or glock-
enspiel, celeste or triangle. Whatever its relation-;
ship to the original, the Bach last night had res-
onance, color interest, and clearly marked voices,
especially in the Fugue. "La Mer" of Debussy, for
those who know the sea in its calm or its sparkling
moods, felt the movement of the water, then light
and sound that play within it. This sea was not ter-,
rorizing even though full of strength and power.
The Ravel "Rapsodie Espagnole," full of insinuat-
ing rhythms, under Stock's organizing left hand,
was another descriptive piece, gay and alluring.
Of Ponselle it can be said that "charm strikes
the sight but merit wins the soul." Bringing opera
to the concert stage in her arias, using her voice
with every nuance, securing smoothness, she com-
bines, as has been said many times and much bet-
ter, personal captivation with technical excellence.
Her last encore could have been omitted in order
to allow the concert to end on a high psychological
point.
The concert proved the aavantage of personal
appearance and contact with an audience, over
the radio, where, until television is perfected, the
show of such a performance is lost.
-Sally Place.
Campus Opinion
- = - - - - ----- ~~n
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The names of commutnicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less
than 500 Words if possible.
COMMITTEE FOR THE THIRTY-EIGHT
DESCRIBE MAY DAY DEMONSTRATION
To the Editor:
At a meeting held Monday night twenty-three
students in person and ten more by proxy, elected
us, a committee of eight, to present to the campus
the true story of the May Day trip to Detroit. We
were instructed to protest against our maltreat-
ment by the Detroit police, the misrepresentation
by the Detroit press, to voice our special disap-
proval of the vicious editorial in the Daily written
with the view to influence opinion against us
before the facts were known, and to demand an,
investigation of the police rather than of the
students.
It has been the custom during the last few years
for a group of students to participate in the
May Day demonstrations. This year a group of
thirty-eight students composed largely of radicals
and liberals who wished to show their solidarity
with the working class and to protest the infringe-
ment of civil rights, several students of sociology,
and a few others interested in observing the dem-

The Theatre
CORRECTED DRAMATIC
SEASON PROGRAM
FOLLOWING IS THE FINAL revised program
of the Dramatic Season to be presented during
five weeks beginning next Monday at the Lydia
Mendelssohn:
First Week:
Monday, May 14: - The American premiere pro-
duction of "The Brontes" with Violet Kemble-
Cooper, Elizabeth Risdon.
Tuesday, May 15-"The Brontes."
Wednesday Mat. and Night, May 16 -"The
Brontes."
Thursday, May 17 - "The Brontes."
Friday Matinee and Night, May 18 - "The
Brontes."
Saturday Matinee and Night, May 19-- "And So
To Bed," with Madame Eugenie Leontovich,
Rollo Peters and Roberta Beatty.
Second Week:
Special Monday Matinee, May 21- Dance Recital,
Charles Weidman, Doris Humphreys.
Monday Night, May 21- "And So To Bed."
Special Tuesday Matinee, May 22 - Dance Recital,
Charles Weidman, Doris Humphreys.
Tuesday Night, May 22 - "And So To Bed."
Wednesday Matinee and Night, May 23 - "And So
To Bed."
Special Thursday Matinee, May 23-Dance Re-
cital, Charles Weidman, Doris Humphreys
Thursday Night, May 24 -"And So To Bed."
Friday Matinee and Night, May 25- "Meet My
Sister," with Walter Slezak, Olive Olsen and Dor-
othy Vernon.
SaturdayMatinee and Night, May 26-- "Meet My
Sister."
Third Week:
Monday, May 28- "Meet My Sister."
Tuesday, May 29 - "Meet My Sister,"
Wednesday Matinee May 30 -"Meet My Sister."
Wednesday Night, May 30- "The Shining Hour"
with Rollo Peters, Violet Kemble-Cooper and
Jessie Busley.
Thursday Night, May 31- "The Shining Hour."
Friday Matinee and Night, June 1- "The Shin-
ing Hour."
Saturday, Matinee and Night, June 2 - "The Shin-
ing Hour."
Fourth Week:
Monday, June 4--"The Shining Hour."
Tuesday, June 5 - "Macbeth" with Ian Keith and
Florence Reed.
Wednesday Matinee and Night, June 6 -"Mac-
beth."
Thursday, June 7- "Macbeth."
Friday Matinee and Night, June 8 - "Macbeth."
Saturday Matinee and Night, June 9 -"Macbeth."
Fifth Week:
Monday, June 11 -"She Loves Me Not" with
Gloria Blondell.
Tuesday, June 12 - "She Loves Me Not."
Wednesday Matinee and Night, June 13 -"She
Loves Me Not."
Special Thursday Matinee, June 14 - "She Loves
Me Not."
Thursday Night, June 14 - "She Loves Me Not."
Friday Matinee and Night, June 15 - "She Loves
Me Not,"
Saturday Matinee and Night, June 16 - "She Loves
Me Not."
Monday, June 18- "She Loves Me Not" (Gala
Closing).
Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
A chemistry instructor at the University of
Maryland asked a student for the formula
of water. The student answered HIJKLMNO.
When asked what the big idea was he ex-
claimed, "That's I to O isn't it?"
Graduates at the University of Kentucky are
listed in a pamphlet called "Bargains in Brains,"
in which the picture of each graduate, his age,
height, chief interest, and experiences are listed.
The plan was used last year with the result that all

but two graduates were placed.
Here's a pet tongue twister from a Speech class
at the University of California. If a student gets
through this one without biting his tongue he can
qualify to take the course: Theophiles Thistle, a
successful thistle sifter, in sifting a sieveful of un-
sifted thistles, thrust three thousand thistle&
through the thick of his tongue; now, if Theo-
philes Thistle, a successful thistle sifter, in sifting
a sieveful of unsifted thistles thrust three thousand
thrcugh the thick of his thumb, see that thou
in sifting a sieveful of unsifted thistles thrust
not three thousand thistles through the thick of
thy thumb.
*I * * *
Next year at Missouri University special flunk-
proof course are offered for "dumb" students and
others not interested in a college degree. Students
of low college ability often make good if allowed
to enter special work in which they are interested
but almost never get through school if they are
forced to take required subjects.
of police prevented the Detroit people from assem-
bling in the park. Seeing that there was no meet-
ing we drove through part of the park and the
neighboring streets cheering and singing workers'
and school songs. A squad of motorcycle police
surrounded the truck and ordered us to follow them
out of the city. Instead of leading us out of the
city the police forced us down a side-street border-
ing the river where they ordered us out of the
truck. Although we obeyed orders explicitly and
gave no provocation for attack, two policemen
boarded the truck, addressed us with obscene lan-
guage, struck several of us with blackjacks and

MAY

FESTIVAL
MAY 10, 111 12
Artists

i

LUCREZIA BORI .....Soprano
ROSA PONSELLE .... Soprano
JEANNETTE VREELAND...
...................Soprano
COE GLADE ........ Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE ...... Tenor
ARTHUR HACKETT ..Tenor

THEODORE WEBB.. Baritone
CHASE BAROMEO...... Bass
GUILA BUSTABO....Violinist
MISCHA LEVITZKI... Pianist
MABEL ROSS RHEAD .....
...............Accompanist
PALMER CHRISTIAN Organist

Organizations
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION .................30 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA......... ...70 Players
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS . .... . . .......400 Voices
THE STANLEY CHORUS .......................... ..Women
Choral IWorks
SONG OF PEACE (Ein Friedenslied)..............Robert Heger
NINTH SYMPHONY.................... . .........Beethoven
THE SEASONS.............................. . ......Haydn
THE UGLY DUCKLING ......................... . .....English
BY THE RUINS OF BABYLON .....................Loeffler
Conductors
EARL V. MOORE...................... . .....Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK ......................Orchestra Conductor
ERIC DeLAMARTER ....................... Associate Conductor
JUVA HIGBEE ,............ ..........Young People's Conductor
PROGRAMS
11. THURSDAY EVENING, 8:15
TEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano MISCHA LEVITSKI, Pianist
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
DHASE BAROMEO, Bass UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK, Conductors
"The Seasons" ..................................................Haydn
An Oratorio for Soprano, Tenor, and Bass Soli,
Mixed Chorus, Orchestra, and Organ
MISS VREELAND, Messrs. ALTHOUSE and BAROMEO and the
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Concerto in G minor for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 22 ....Saint-Saens
Andante sostenuto
Allegro scherzando
Presto
111. FRIDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
GUILA BUSTABO, Violinist ERIC DE LAMARTER and
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS JUVA IIIGBEE, Conductors
STANLEY CHORUS
Allegro from Concerta No. 2 in F maor for Trumpet ana
Strings ("Brandenberg")...............................Bach
Songs:
On Wings of Song..............................Mendelssohn
Hedge Roses ...........................................Schubert
Blue Danube Waltz...................................J. Strauss
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso for Violin and Orchestra,
Op. 28.................... ......................... Saint-Saenis
GUILA BUSTABO
Cantata, "The Ugly Duckling" ...... .....................Engsh
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
First Symphony ........................Milhaud
By the Waters of Babylon ...............................Loeffler
THE STANLEY CHORUS
Andante and Rondo-Allegro from "Symphony Espagnol .
for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 21...........................Lan
MISS BUSTABO
IV. FRIDAY EVENING, 8:15
LUCREZIA BOR, Soprano
CHICAGO SYPMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Fantasie, "A Night on a Bare Mountain" ..............Moussorgsky
Aria, "Vol che sapete........ ....... ...............+Mozart
LUCREZIA BORI
Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98 ..........................Brahms
Recitative and Aria of Lia ("L'Enfant Prodigue")............Debussy
MISS BORI
"Sailor's Dance" ("Pavot Rouge").........................Gliere
Aria, "Depuis le Jour" ("Louise")...................... Charpentier
MISS BORI
V. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano THEODORE WEBB, Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Overture to "Carlolanus," Op. 6 ......................Beethoven
Symphony No. 9, in D minor, Op. 125.................Beethoven
MISS VREELAND, MISS GLADE, MR: HACKETT. AND MR. WEBB
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Tone Poemr"Ein Heldenleben," Op. 40.....................Strauss
The Hero
The Hero's Adversaries
The Hero's Companion
The Hero's Battlefield
The Hero's Mission of Peace -
The Hero'.4 Escape from the World - Conclusion
VI. SATURDAY EVENING, 8:15
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, EARL V. MOORE, Conductor

If I A Rna o P~p f inP ipl Qi d I .............. ee~r

PRINTING
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LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4
FOR RENT
COSTUMES and wigs rented, Wuerth
Theatre, second floor. 450
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: A white poodle puppy. Last
seen on corner of State and Huron

Streets at noon Wednesday. Phone
4624. Reward. 452

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