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May 08, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MICHIGAN DAILY

A ~S

I

.,. _

"' -"

' I

. 14<,- --TD( L0A' O.IT ygTpPUAToU 7 w m Mtrcrrrwy nxu E.........., .
1'uoished every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Sessiou by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
oriated tdlle inte i resz
1933 NatIoxNL .'cofreaac)1934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
i republication of all news dispathces credited to it or
,ist otherwise credited in thi. paper and the local news
prulshed herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
aitered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
S cond Class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third A istant Postmaster-General.
- Subscrption during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
#.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mai, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publicat;'ns Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: Colege Publications Representaties.
Inc., 4G East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
B yison Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR .........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CITY EDITOR......... ...........BACKL&Y SHAW
EDITORIAL DIRECT OR ............. C. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDTOR....... ......... LBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR .................CAROL J. HANAN
EIGHT EDITORS: A. Eu Ball, Ralph G. Coulter. William
. IFerris, John C, Healcy, George Van Vieck, E. Jerome
.. Pttit,
6PORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford. Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomas A. Groehn,
John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
G. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch,
Arthur S. Settle, Jacob C, Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub.
Dorothy Gies; Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .....................
. ......,......... CATHARINE MO HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
4SSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Fiorez, Doris GimmyB etty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Si nondb.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avn'r, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Levin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Hardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
NIGHT EDITOR : E. JEROME PETTIT
The Sunmier
Session.*
SINCE THE TIME, 41 years ago,
when gardeners and repair-men
furnished the only activities on the campus dur-
ing the summer, the Summer Session of the
University has grown to one of the most justly
faiftous and popular schools in the country.
The staff for the Summer Session numbers more
than 400 members, including as many as 40 promi-
nent educators from other institutions in this
country and abroad. Approximately 700 courses
will be offered by this faculty.
One of the most popular features of the Summer
Session is the extensive program of social and
extra-curricular activities which is made available
to all students. Among the special events on this
program are a series of excursions, concerts by
the faculty of the School of Music and by the
band, a series of plays extending throughout the
session, a series of public lectures by prominent
faculty members, social nights at the League,
and opportunity for participation in sports, for
which the use of automobiles is allowed.
In addition to the instruction given in Ann
Arbor, special courses are offered each year at
the four summer camps of the University. These
are Camp Davis, the oldest camp in the country
for students of surveying, now located near Jack-
son, Wyoming; the Biological Station on Douglas
lake near Cheboygan with opportunities for indi-
vidual research as well as class instruction; the
Field Station for Geology and Geography at
Mill Springs, Ky.; and Camp Filibert Roth for for-
estry students in the Upper Peninsula near Mu-
nising.

From the financial standpoint, attendance at the
Summer Session has definite attractions. Rooming
house rates are much lower than during the college
year. Railroad rates to and from the session have
been reduced one third for students and faculty
members. Fees for the 1934 Summer Session
are on the same low basis as last year.
To the Summer Session come students and
teachers from 48 states and as many as 30 foreign
countries. When you read the catalogue, or talk to
someone who has attended it, you understand
why.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked.to be brief. confining themselves to less

iI

mentary interviews, held at different times, does
not support the headlines. I endeavored to state
only the constitutional protection of the rights of
assemblage and of freedom of speech, and to state
the limitations upon both rights.
I did not defend the police action on May Day,
for I do not know what the students did and what
the police did. In substance, I said that the police
had a right to prevent the holding of a public
meeting where it would cause dangerous conges-
tion of traffic or conduce to unlawful conduct. I
do not know that the students were guilty of un-
lawful conduct, and I should be one of the first
to condemn wrongful use of force and of coarse
brutality by the police.
Dean Henry M. Bates.
To The Editor:
When certain members of the student body
"smirch" the name of the University of Michigan
by embroilments with the police (the recent skir-
mish with the Vulcans) rarely, if ever, are these
students called before an arbitrarily selected non-
representative body of faculty members and stu-
dents "to be investigated." And rightly so. I think
these matters concern the student alone.
But when students, who are not content to re-
main isolated from the forces in society which are
making for a change in our avowedly bankrupt
social order, and go to the scene of conflict, to life
itself, abuse and invective are piled on from all
sides.
Not only violations of rights of free speech, as-
semblage, etc., were committed by our alleged
upholders of the law, but physical violence, as evi-
denced by a broken blackjack (now in our posses-
sion), was used. Profanity; confiscation of song
books, destruction of banners, and separation of
the students from their hired truck are only inci-
dentals when we consider the principles involved.
We students have lost many illusions in the past
four years. We already know what to expect from
the "Kept Press." But surely, from our own campus
paper we did not and should not expect the treat-
ment accoided participants on the trip. A small
list includes a plea for expulsion,' distortion of
facts, and sidetracking discussion from the prin-
ciples involved of brutality, free speech, etc., to
whether we "stick by our guns."
'Finally, the credit should be given to those de-
partments, (Sociology, etc.) individual professors,
and instructors who at least gave us moral
support; the acts of the administration are to be
condemned.
Yielding to the sensationalism of metropolitan
headlines (which sold out their papers completely
in Ann Arbor for three days) of "Students Face
Expulsion," "Investigation to be Launched," an
investigation was begun.
Probably the worst infringement on our rights
as students to go where we pleased was this in-
vestigation. It was conducted behind closed doors,
asecretary taking complete notes, the committee
non-representative of general student opinion. It
has all the characteristics of a medieval inquisition.
Questions as to political beliefs, purpose in going,
affiliations, communist, socialist, Vanguard Club,
National Student League, fraternity, etc., seemed
to bear pertinently on the subject.
I would have refused to testify unless the meet-
ing was open to the public and all participants
were invited to be present. By what right did the,
committee summon these students at 1:30 and keep
them in an anteroom waiting for hours while others
were put through a virtual third degree for as long
as forty-five minutes?
This trip was no "lark" as it has been called.
Nor do we merit the laughter and ridicule recom-
mended by Dean Henry A. Bates in the May 6
issue of the Michigan Daily.
It is a symptom of a decaying and dying system
when mass meetings are bared. To think in 1928
that a truck of 42 students and three private cars.
from Ann Arbor to Detroit would result in front
page headlines for three days is out of the question.
The fright of officials show they fear our finding
out things for ourselves. I suppose that's why books
are written for us; but somehow I feel this trip
taught us more than many a 4 year course in
the University of Michigan in 1934.
Karl Cannon, Secretary
National Student League.
To the Editor:
With the admirable clearness of the legal minded,1
Dean Henry M. Bates of the University Law School;
argues, in The Daily of May 6, that Mayor Frank

Couzens of Detroit had a valid reason for prohibit-
ing a worker's parade and demonstration in that
city on May i, because "it was obvious that violence
was likely to result,"
Eighty-seven worker's organizations wished to
parade and demonstrate. It should be pointed out
that any violence which was likely to have occurred
would have been between workers and police, be-
tween workers groups themselves, or between
workers and non - workers. There would have
been no violence between workers groups because
it was a successful united May Day front. There
are no civilian oppositions to workers groups in
Detroit that would have used extra-legal means to
suppress labor demonstrations. Therefore the only
possibility of the "violence that was likely to re-
sult" would have been between the workers and the
police, and for the sole reason that the police had
orders not to allow the parade and demonstration
to take place, and to use all means to break it up.
In brief if the parade had not been prohibited, no
violence would have been potentially possible.
That no violence occurred in Grand Circus Park'
or Clark Park on May Day afternoon does not
seem to have been the fault of the Detroit police
administration. Every other "worker" was a plain-
clothes man. The air was blue with policemen. The
working class leaders very rightly decided that, in
the interests of public peace they had better not
tamper with this potentially violent mob of cops.
Despite the opinion of Dean Bates, it seems
necessary to conclude that the right of assembly is
involved, for, had there been no order restraining
the people from parading, no violence would likely
have resulted.
Davis Hobbs, '35L.
Maurice J. Wilsie. Grad.

Screen Reflections
AT THE MICHIGAN
"BOTTOMS UP"
Smoothy ...................Lee Tracy
Wand ..................Pat Patterson
Hal ........................John Boles
This is another musical picture, but it is better
than the average of its type because of the fol-
lowing reasons; the presence of a new, fresh,
charming leading lady, Pat Patterson, the hilarious
character 6f the comedy, and the restraint shown
in presenting the musical numbers. The cast is also
noteworthy, having among its members the volup-
tuous Thelma Todd, the volcanic Harry Green, and
the very blank Sid Silvers.
The story is the cinderella one which concerns
itself with having the little girl make good in the
big city. The city is Hollywood, and the manner
in which she achieves her success is the basis
for the entertaining situations. She is skyrocketed
to fame by means of a sheer veneer of amusing
bluffing ot the part of her chance acquaintance,
Smoothy aind two of his questionably honest, but
unquestionably entertaining pals. These three
rollick through the picture, polishing it with a
lightness that no picture of this type could be
without. Miss Patterson and Mr. Boles take care
of the more serious parts of the picture, which
are well-related to the character of the whole
thing. The musical numbers ("Turn on the Moon,"
and "Waiting at the Gate for Katie") have been
woven into the story with considerablly more
smoothness than is found in most musical pic-
tures. "Bottoms Up" is altogether a successfully
entertaining picture. -C.B.C.
0leglate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
An ex-junior at LaSalle College now a student
at the University of Besancon, France writes that
contrary to popular belief, French dates are not so
hot. Going to a cafe recently to meet a girl, he
found that she had brought both her parents
along.
Perhaps they were hungry too. Even Frenchmen
have to eat now and then.
Here's a poem? coming from a poor little
co-ed at Northwestern University:
How sweet the co-ed!
How true! How brave!
Who will kiss a man
When he needs a shave!
v : a
And here are another columnist's pet peeves re-
garding women, voiced in the University of Wash-
ington paper: Women who look like a parenthesis
mark when they dance; who sing in the ears of
their dates; who wipe off excess lipstick on the
collars of unsuspecting males; who talk about all
their other dates; who pluck their eyebrows un-
evenly; who wear mascara which runs; who ap-
pear in sweaters which are too short; who affect
violently colored fingernails and freshly set hair
with a varnished look; who pull up their hose in
public or chew gum at dances. The critic closes by
admitting that women however are a necessary
evil.
* * .
Here's a quip coming from a kappa at the
University of Wisconsin: -
Male students are degenerating in the dust
while the co-eds are broadening above the
waste.
in itself if separated from the conditions in De-
troit that gave it importance and news value.
(2.) These conditions in Detroit were: The denial
of the civil liberty of "free assemblage."
The marking off of the proletariat as unfit to
demonstrate.
The unnecessary provocation of trouble by
massing armed policemen in the city. (I feel cer-
that that if Watkins had been Police Commissioner
an entirely different policy would have been used).
In my mind these are the crucial issues that should
be discussed by thinking citizens and students;
not the truck and the personalities in it.
(3.) I consider the action of the police both

unwise and unnecessary. Although respecting the
fact that they were under orders to prevent demon-
strations, yet I would protest their roughness and
terrorism methods.
(4.) However, the students that went to Detroit
should have been expecting trouble and should
take it like men. Conditions in Detroit were well
known in advance.
Regarding Subsequent Developments-
(1.) I brand as almost dishonest and cowardly
the attitude of some, if even a few, that went to
Detroit who now say it was merely an educational
and sociological trip. This profession now assumed
in spite of the provocative mimeographed state-
ment, "To You Students Who Think," which was
distributed widely on the Campus on April 31, is in-
defensible, it seems to me, and greatly compromises
their position. Further, it certainly will not increase
the working man's confidence in student stability
and leadership to learn that the student May Day
Demonstration was merely a harmless educational
jaunt.
(2.) The statement "Much Ado About Nothing"
will do much more harm than good. In the first
place I do not agree that the whole situation was
'nothing', as I have indicated. Secondly, it greatly
stretches the truth in presenting the incident as
merely educational.
(3.) The honest and courageous thing for the
number of socialist and communist students that
went to Detroit to do is to state their convictions
regarding labor and its cause and then take their
medicine like men.
(4.) TheĀ° attitude and conduct of The Michigan
Daily throughout this affair has been both unin-
telligent and poor journalistically. It has dealt in
ftrms of nbernnalities inster Af issin Altholugh

MAY-

,. ,

FESTIVAL
MAY 9, 10, 11, 12
Artists

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of beautiful cards for
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there are also many
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the "Mother of my
Sweetheart"MyOther
Mother"My ister on
Mother's Da/and so on,
You will derive much
pleasure in sending
these messages on
Mother's Day and think
too of the 'oy you
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Also MOTHER'S DAY
POSTAGE STAMPS
OD.Morrill
314 South State St.
GREETING CARDS
FOR ALL OCCASIONS

LUCREZIA BORI .....Soprano
ROSA PONSELLE .. ..Soprano
JEANNETTE VREELAND...
.Soprano
COE GLADE ........ Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE ...... Tenor
ARTHUR HACKETT ... Tenor

THEODORE WEBB. Baritone
CHASE BAROMEO......Bass
GUILA BUSTABO.. . .Violinist
MISCHA LEVITZKI.. .Pianist
MABEL ROSS RHEAD......
..............Accompanist
PALMER CHRISTIAN Organist

Organizations
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION...............30 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ... . .........70 Players
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS........... . ..400 Voices
THE STANLEY CHORUS...... . ....................Women
Choral W orks
SONG OF PEACE (Ein Friedenslied) ...............Robert Heger
-.NINTH SYMPHONY................ . . .. . . .........Beethoven
THE SEASONS.... . ............ .... ....... ........Haydn
THE UGLY DUCKLING ..... . ...........................English
BY THE RUINS OF BABYLON ... . ......... . ......Loeffler
Conductors
EARL V. MOORE . ..............................Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK...................Orchestra Conductor
ERIC DeLAMARTER ............ ... ......Associate Conductor
JUVA HIGBEE ......... . .............Young People's Conductor
P ROG RAMS
I. WEDNESDAY EVENING, 8:15
ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Prelude and Fugue ("St. Anne's") E-flat major ..........Bach-Stock
Aria, "Bel Raggio Lusinghier," ("Semiramide")............Rossini
MISS PONSELLE
La Mer (The Sea) ........ ....................................Debussy
From Dawn to Noon at Sea
Gambols of the Waves
Dialogue Between the Wind and Sea
Arias, "Adio del Passato" (La Traviata")...... ............ . .Verdi
"Chanson Boheme" ("Carmen")......................Bizet
MISS PONSELLE
Rapsodie Espagnole..........................................+.Ravel
Songs with Piano:
Freschi LUoghi Prati Aulenti ...................Stefano Donaudy
Marietta's Lied from "Die Tote Stadt"..........Erich Korngold
Respetto........................................E. Wolf-Ferrari
Si Tu Le Voulais................................F. Paolo Tosti
My Lover He Comes on a Ski .....................Clough-Leighter
ROSA PONSELLE
Mr. Stuart Ross at the Piano
II. THURSDAY EVENING, 8:15
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano MISCHA LEVITSKI Pianist
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
CHASE BAROMEO, Bass UNIVERSITY CORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK, Conductors
'The Seasons" ..............................................Haydn
An Oratorio for Soprano, Tenor, and Bass Soli,
Mixed Chorus, Orchestra, and Organ
MISS VREELAND, Messrs. ALTHOUSE and BAROMEO and the
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Concerto in G minor for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 22 ....Saint-Saens
Andante sostenuto
Allegro scherzando
Presto
II1. FRIDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
GUILA BUSTABO, Violinist ERIC DE LAMARTER and
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS JUVA HIGBEE, Conductors
STANLEY CHORUS
Allegro from Concerta No. 2 in F major for Trumpet ana
Strings ("Brandenberg")....................................Bach
Songs:
On Wings of Song........... . -......................Mendelssohn
Hledge Roses .........................................Schu.brt'
Blue Danube Waltz ........... . . .J. Strauss
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso for Violin and Orchestra,
IntOp2 ...........Saint-Saens
Op. 28...-..-....----GUILA BUSTABO
Cantata, "The Ugly Duckling"A...............English
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS. ih
First Symphony ....................... .... .......... .... .... Milhaud
By the Waters of Babylon... ..... .....Loeffler
THE STANLEY CHORUS
Andante and Rondo-Allegro from "Symphony Espagnole"
for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 21.............................Lalo
MISS BUSTABO
IV. FRIDAY EVENING, 8:15
LUCREZIA BORI. Soprano
CHICAGO SYPMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Fantasie. "A Night on a Bare Mountain"...........Moussorgsky
Aria, "Voi che sapete" ..... ..-.....-".--..-Mozart
LUCREZIA BORI
Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98 ...........................Brahms
Recitative and Aria of Lia ("L'Enfant Prodigue") ............Debussy
MISS BORI
"Sailor's Dance" ("Pavot Rouge")...........................Gliere
Aria, "Depuis le Jour" ("Louise").. . . ..... . ............harpentler
MISS BORI
V. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano THEODORE WEBB, Bass
COEAGLADE, Contralto UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Overture to "Cariolanus," Op. 62 ................ ......Beethoven
Symphony No. 9, in D minor, Op. 125 .......................Beethoven
MISS VREELAND, MISS GLADE. MR. IACKETT AND MR. WEBB
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Tone Poem, "Ein Heldenleben," Op. 40.........................Strauss
The Hero
The Hero's Adversaries
The Hero's Companion
The Hero's Battlefield
The Hero's Mission of Peace
The Hero's Escape from the World -- ConbCusloln

VI. SATURDAY EVENING, 8:15
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto PALMER CHRISTIAN. Organist"
PATTT. ATTTOTTSE Tenor UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION

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