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May 05, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MICHIGAN DAILY

1j

to be determined in proportion to the number at-
tending, they would have to teach something or
starve to death.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less
than 500 words if possible.

Puoished every morning except Monday during the
university year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
'$50ciated _oU eiato nte re -
.__19 3 Cw nATK-HALjw. ~134
s -en gav>na
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Entered at the rost Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
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Offices: Student Pubicatiuns Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives.
Inc., 4G East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue.
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.......... .THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CITY EDITOR....... ... ........... BAACKLSY SHAW
EDITORIL DIRiETOR......'.....C. HAKRT HCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR...................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................C.CAROL J. HANAN
RIGHT EDTORS: A. Eils Ball, Ralph 0. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, John C, Healey, George Van Vleck, E. Jerome
Pettit.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blun,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J, Elliott,
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Arthur M. Taub.
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Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
I&VSINESS MANAGER............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .....................
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DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-l
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertisingj
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tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rgthbard, George Atherton,
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Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louisel
Florez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret;
Mustard, Betty Smondb.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome1
Grossman, Avnr, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Levin, Willy Tomlirison, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Hardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
NIGHT EDITOR: WILLIAM G. FERRIS
V.lcans Distur
,The Peace...
T RADITIONAL CEREMONIES of the
Vulcans' initiation raid resulted,
Thursday night in a warning by Ann Arbor police
force that such activities must be conducted "in an
orderly manner." Complaints, the police charged,
had been made by residents of this fair city "Where
Education and Commerce Meet" against the dis-
turbance of the peace.
We doubt that the action of the police force is
in accord with the wishes of a majority of the
people. We hope not.
Ann Arbor people know this is a college town.
They also know that if they intend to get all thel
commerce they must put up with some of the edu-
cation, and honor society initiations, which,l
whether they like. ior not, are a part of education
at Michigan.
If the good people of the city don't like it, our
best suggestion is to get on their children's roller
skates, after the kids have come home from dis-
turbing the libraries, and see how far they can
ride in any one direction without stopping.
Another Kinch'
Of Cran.Min. ..
PROBABLY DR. HUTCHINS did not
realize, last week, that he was at-
tacking a Michigan tradition when he deprecated
reduction of the process of education to a problem
in fancy accounting to determine if the students

have taken enough of the right courses to grad-
uate.
Perseverence is ours, for despite the repeated as-
sertion by leading edpcators throughout the world
that education must come naturally and cannot
be jammed down the throats of the unwilling stu-
dent, we of Michigan have here compulsory class-
room attendance. The fact that many instructors
indulge in the practice of not reporting more than
three absences, as they are instructed to do, is
only an expression of dissatisfaction with a rule
for compulsory attendance and an admission of its
futility. The rule is there.
The faculty, of course, cannot criticize openly;
they might lose their jobs.
Nevertheless, compulsory attendance is a thorn
in everyone's side; its champions are scarce. The
University is an institution for education. It makes
no difference whether such education takes place
in the students quarters, in the library, or in the
recitation room. That the class rooms at the Uni-
vesito nf Chieago are considered a gnnd ne to

DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE
To The Editor:
The unprecedented event of the Interscholastic
Michigan Peace Conference in Ann Arbor yesterday
and today offers an opportunity to begin on the
ground-work necessary to an effective understand-
ing of the complex and challenging situation facing
the world on the baffling problem of war.
Those students who have worked to make this
Conference possible represent not one, but many
attitudes and opinions. The fact that the Michigan
League Against War and Militarism has enlarged
so rapidly and has brought in students of such
diverse ideas is an indication of itsmerit. For the
purpose of those who are sincere in this question,
and who are informing themselves, and thinking
through a program of action, is that students must
bring their energies to bear in purposive results.
There are many organizations such as the Amer-
ican Association of University Women, and the
National Council for Prevention of War that are
carrying on as best they can to inform the mass
of citizens on the Victories of Peace as opposed to
those of war. It is our aim to co-operate with these
organizations in a reasonable way, using non-vio-
lent means to turn back the machinery of war by
substituting the machinery of Peace.
We believe that it will pay us as students to put
our backing to this movement that is already repre-
sented by the earnest and progressive elements of
our country. We feel that we must surround the
Peace movement with all the picture, song and
story that has enhanced the military in the popular
mind in the past. We invite you to hear the
orchestra that will play Friday night to give us
the atmosphere which we should have and that has
been too long neglected in this regard.
We believe that UNITED ACTION from youth
will carry much weight in the victories of Peace,
that not only our present influence, but our coming
votes will benefit us all. We must stop unlicensed'
armaments; and direct taxation into civic, and
honest and open channels.
Is it possible that any student will stand on this,
side line without lifting a single utterance or mak-
ing a single effort in fact-finding and in individual
initiative for so tremendous and so crucial a cause?
Are we to allow a handful of "crime makers" to
delude us with their lobbyists, their secret and
highly-paid representatives to wreck Peace and
disarmament conferences, and continue to rob us,
and disgrace us with the world?
It cost, as estimated, $25,000 to kill a man in the
World War. Much of this amount went to enrich
the armament makers. Is it possible that a great
people cannot find means of uniting with the other
peoples of the world to license, restrict, and con-
trol munitions?
What are you willing and ready to contribute in
this program of UNITED ACTION? In this time of
scientific mastery the victories of Peace are more
than ever in history, greater than the victories
of war. We submit to you the necessity for your
individual and earnest effort in UNITED ACTION'
AGAINST WARR!!--GF.
IN THE REV. KLAER'S DEFENSE
To The Editor:
In the Michigan Daily of May 3 there appeared
in an editorial entitled "Trouble Seekers Usually
Find It," an opinion, which, because it might carry
weight with those whose knowledge of Rev. Klaer
is no greater than the Daily's deserves a brief an-
swer from the students of the Presbyterian Young
People's Society. We have from rather long ac-
quaintance with the Rev. Klaer conceived for him
great admiration and respect. It was implied in
the Daily's Editorial that "the student pastor who
drove the truck" was "too weak to stick by his
guns."
To those who criticize Mr. Klaer's part in the
Detroit trip as ill advised, we suggest a more care-
ful investigation of his original conception of the
expedition. But toward those who, without that
knowledge, attack the Rev. Klaer's sincerity and
honest courage we have only a feeling of impa-
tience.. In turning from his personal integrity and
active realization of the demands of Christian liv-
ing to the misrepresentation of his statements
which have appeared in a metropolitan paper and
to the editorial comment which slipped into The
Michigan Daily on the basis of very inadequate
facts, we feel that the standards of journalism
which have been revealed in covering this story
might have something to gain from the idealism of
the Rev. Klaer.

President, Presbyterian
Young Peoples Society

The Theatre
DETROIT'S NEWEST
STOCK COMPANY
AFTER MORE THAN A YEAR of doldrums, the
dramatic stock company business in Detroit is
beginning to pick up; and this is a blessed thing
in our eyes. The present organization is The De
Forest Famous Players, which has an indefinite
engagement at the Wilson Theatre, and which is
presenting a new play each week. Their current
offering is P. G. Wodehouse' frothily neat parlor
comedy, "By Candle Light." Monday evening they
will open with "The Dark Tower," which Broadway
accepted very graciously from the joint pens of
Alexander Woolcott and that collaborator of col-
laborators, George S. Kaufman.
Directing these productions is Ainsworth Arnold,
a trouper who has done almost everything imagin-
able in the acting line. He will be most recently
remembered for his work with the Robert Hender-
son productions at the Detroit Cass and the Ann.
Arbor Majestic last fall; particularly felicitous, it
will be recalled, was his Oliver Jordan, the tired
business man with the diseased heart, in: "Dinner
at Eight," and his Sergeant Totty, an unusual sort
of police sergeant who is both dumb and invested
with a sense of humor, in "Criminal at Large," the
two productions which played Ann Arbor. Mr.
Arnold is no stranger to this locality: he has ap-
peared in most of the Henderson Dramatic Seasons,
and has done some direction for Comedy Club.
Also in the company, as featured players, are Mar-
garet Fitch, Melva Gerard, Martin Burton, and
Phillip Dakin.
Since the opening of the fall season in 1932, the
following stock companies have played Detroit:
The Detroit Civic Theatre, under Robert Hender-
son; a revamped Civic Theatre, directed by Thomas
'Wood Stevens; and Robert Henderson's Cass The-
atre season. That blessed with most longevity was
the Henderson Civic Theatre. These engagements
have punctuated long periods of dramatic torpor.
Perhaps the De Forest Famous Players will bring
Detroit a New Theatrical Deal.
Musical Events
A.
BAND CONCERT
IN DETROIT
T HE SAME CONCERT that was given April 2 in
Hill Auditorium plus the addition of three
Michigan marches will be played by the Varsity
Band under the direction of Leonard Falcone at
the Naval Armory in Detroit, 8:15 p.m. Joseph
Brinkman, as before, will perform the Liszt Hun-
garian Fantasy, arranged by Nicholas Falcone.
The three marches are: "M-Men" by Falcone;
"Varsity" by Moore; and "Victors" by Elbel. Leon-
ard Falcone, instrumental music director of Mich-
igan State College and director of the M.S.C. Mil-
itary Band, is guest conductor, in the place of h§
brother Nicholas the regular leader of the band.
The proceeds of the concert will be turned over
to the Starr Commonwealth for Boys.
As Others See It
* C ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~~-- - --~

FESTIVAL
MAY 9, 10, 11, 12
Artists

Look to
State and

MAY

LUCREZIA BORI... Soprano
ROSA PONSELLE .Soprano
JEANNETTE VREELAND...
.Soprano
COE GLADE.......Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE ...... Tenor
ARTHUR HACKETT ...Tenor

_.I

THEODORE WEBB.. Baritone
CHASE BAROMEO...... Bass
GUILA BUSTABO.... Violinist
MISCHA LEVITZKI. . .Pianist
MABEL ROSS RHEAD..... .
.. .........Accompanist
PALMER CHRISTIAN Organist

WHY WE NEED
A BUILDING REVIVAL
The country's housing shortage at this time is in
the paradoxical position of being more real than
apparent. That is, there are greater statistical evi-
dences than visible signs of its existence.
The observer sees many "For Rent" signs, but
he should also consider these facts: Of the 30,-
000,000 families in the United States, 4,000,000, it is
estimated, have "doubled up" with others since
the *depression began, and 3,000,000 more live in
slums unfit for habitation. If the average life of a
residential unit is taken as 50 years, then some
600,000 are due for replacement annually. James
S. Taylor, chief of the housing division of the
Department of Commerce, estimates conservatively
that 350,000 single family homes are needed an-
nually to fill the normal demand and the losses
from fire, storm, obsolescence, etc. Yet total build-
ing in the last four years has provided homes for
only 280,000 families! The country may have been
overbuilt in some respects, but such a terrific slump
in home construction makes normal demand sur-
pass supply.
The return of normal repair and modernization
work alone would produce a substantial boom.
From the peak of $522,479,000 spent for this pur-
pose in 1925, the amount fell to $48,570,000 in 1932.
The back-to-the-farm movement offers a rich
field for improvement of rural homes. There are
thousands of others that lack modern appliances
and conveniences.
Granting the points made by a writer in the let-
ter column today about our country's approach to a
stationary population, let us note an opinion on
what economic recovery would mean to the hous-
ing situation at the present time. The speaker
is Arthur J. Mertzke, economist of the Federal
Home Loan Bank Board. He says: "Were normal
industrial conditions to prevail within the next few
weeks, we should experience a shortage of housing
vastly more acute than that which followed the
World War."
Thousands of families are now living in unde-
sirable quarters, some because of unemployment,
others because suitable financing is unavailable.
The National Lumber Manufacturers' Association
recently reported the results of a survey among
dealers in 883 counties in 48 states. These dealers
reported they had 300,000 prospects with cash on
hand, ready to start construction whenever they
obtained reasonable financing. The problem of
rebuilding the slums, to rescue thousands of fam-
ilies from squalor, is a crying need, now being at-

I Organizations
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION .................30 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ............70 Players
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS.............400 Voices
T HE STANLEY CHORUS ............. . .......... . .... . Women
Choral Wo rks
SONG OF PEACE (Ein Friedenslied) ............... Robert Heger
NINTH SYMPHONY .................................Beethoven
THE SEASONS....................................Haydn
THE UGLY DUCKLING .................................English
BY THE RUINS OF BABYLON . ............... .... . . .Loeffler
Conductors
EARL V. MOORE...........................Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK ............... . .....Orchestra Conductor
ERIC DeLAMARTER ......................Associate Corguctor
JUVA HIGBEE .......... . ..... . ...Young People's Conductor
PROGRAMS
. WEDNESDAY EVENING, 8:15
ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Prelude and Fugue ("St. Anne's") E-flat major ...,..Bach-Stock
Aria, "Bel Ragglo Lusinghier," ("Semiramide") ..........Rossini
MISS PONSELLE
La Mer (The Sea) ............................... ...........Debussy
From Dawn to Noonat Sea
Gambols of the Waves
Dialogue Between the Wind and Sea
Arias, "Adlo del Passato" (La Travlata")...................Verdi
"Chanson Boheme" ("Carmen") ........................Bizet
MISS PONSELLE
Rapsodle Espagnole......................................Ravel
Songs with Piano:
Fresehi Luoghi Prati Aulenti.................Stefano Donaudy
Marietta's Lied from "Die Tote Stadt"........Erich Korngod
Resetto ................................... ..E. Wol-Ferrari
Si T4 Le Voulais..... P101 Tosti
My Lover He Comes on at Ski ...................Clough-Leg'ter
ROSA PONSELLE
Mr. Stuart Ross at the Pano
II. THURSDAY EVENING, 8:15
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano MISHA LEVITSKI, Pianist
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
-HASE BAROMEO, Bass UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK, Conductors
"The Seasons" .................................................Haydn
An Oratorio for Soprano, Tenor, and. Bass Soli,
Mixed Chorus, Orchestra, and Organ
MISS VREELAND, Messrs. ALTHOUSE and BROMEO and the
UNIVERSITY CHOAL ,UNION
Concerto in G minor for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 22 ....Saint-Saens
Andante sostenuto
Allegro scherzando
Presto
III. FRIDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
GUILA BUSTABO, Violinist ERIC DE LAMARTER and
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS JUVA HIGBEE, Conductors
STANLEY CHORUS
Allegro from Concerta No. 2 in F major for Trumpet ana -Bch
Strings ("Brandenberg")...............................B
Songs:Mendelssohn
On Wings of Song..............:...............M.ndelseoh
Hedge Roses.................. .....,.,.......,........ Schubert
Blue Danube W altz ..................J.S ra
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso for Violin and Orchestra,
Op. 28..........--28-.-...-
Cantata, "The Ugly Duckling".............Engsh
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS.......nl-
First Symphony.........--.. -. ........-....Milhaud
By the Waters of Babylon........ .......Loeffler
THE STANLEYCHRUS,
Andante and Rondo-Allegro from "Symphony Espagnole"
for Volin and Orchesta Op 21 ..:..................... .....Lao
MISS BUSTABO
IV. FRIDAY EVENING, 8:15
LUCREZIA BORI, Soprano
CHICAGO SYPMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Fantasie, "A Night on a Bare Mountain"............Moussorgsky
Aria, "Voi che sapete" .. .... -....................Mozart
Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98..... ... .............Brahms
Recitative and Aria o Lia ("L'Enfant Prodigue")...........Debussy
MISS$ BORI . Sio'
"Sailor's Dance" ("Pavot Rouge') ......................Gliere
Aria, "Depuis le Jour" ("LouIe... ......". - - " " -"-.. .. . . Charpentier
V. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano THEODORE WEBB, Bass
COFE GLADE, Contralto UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Overture to "Cariolanus," Op. 6.... .. . .Bethoven
Symphony No. 9, in D minor, Op. 125 ..............Beethoven
MISS VREELAND, MISS GLADE, MR. HACKETT, AND MR. WEBB
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION'
Tone Poem, "Ein Hedenleben," Op. 40..... ...... .....Strauss
The Hero
The Hero's Adversaries
The Hero's Companion
The Hero's Battlefield
The Hero's Mission of Peace
The Hero's Escape from the World - Conclusion
VI, SATURDAY EVENING, 8:15

JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
'PA T TT. A nT. ' M TTITVERRSTTY CHORAL UNION

... . ._ ! t

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10

Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
Three University of Washington students were
arrested, jailed and released on bond for putting'
up anti-war posters. All three were members of the
National Student League and the Legion Against
War. One of the same students was also arrested
last week on a charge of disturbing an American
Legion parade.
* * * *
My letter for the lovelorn last week seems to
have influenced a young co-ed on the campus.
here is her letter:
Dear Mr. Bernard:
I have a date to go on a canoe ride and a
picnic with a Deke Saturday. He said he is
going to bring aloni the food anl music (Vic-

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