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May 02, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MICHIGAN DAILY opinion to a high pitch can statesmen and others
plunge us into war.
In the bright light of a sensible peace-loving
public opinion such attempts to release unreason-
- fing forces can be seen as they are. Only by refusing
to become excited and by counting to ten slowly in
r- L ,a crisis can we hope to keep our young men at
home and our nation at peace.

5
x
3
r
a

The Theatre

Ill

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
xgoeiatd ( oli¢iate urezs
-OF Xey C a..- .
_, 1933 ein~aYWNAL - coVERA 43
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispathces credited to it or
not otherwise credited in thi. paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Enatered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
S scription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
#1.50. During regula school year by carrier, $3.75; by
m.ail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Pub lications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,j
Inc., 4G East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 801
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ..........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR.............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR......................BftACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR..................ALBERTH. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.....................CAROL J. HANAN
IGHT EDITORS: A. Eis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, John C, Healey, George Van Vleck, E. Jerome
Pettit.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: .Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J, Flaherty, Thomass A. Groehn,
John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
G. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch,
Arthur S. Settle, Jacob C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub.
Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUISNESS MANAGER ..................
.................CATHAINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Florez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonds.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer; William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avn r, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Lcvin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Hardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
NIGHT EDITOR: GEORGE VAN VLECK
Mouldy
Laws..
E VERY ONCE IN A WHILE some
ambitious soul, delving into the ar-
chives, comes up with a legal monstrosity that for-
tunately is no longer enforced, but unfortunately
still remains to clutter up the statute books and
confuse law enforcement matters.
In the city of Milwaukee, now famous as one
of the best-governed cities in the country, a news-
paper discovered recently that an existing city or-
dinance makes it illegal to play baseball on a
city playground.
"The throwing, catching, or batting of baseballs,"
the law reads, "in any of the streets, alleys, school
grounds, or other public grounds is hereby pr6-
hibited," Of course this ordinance is no longer en-
forced, but any citizen has the right to demand it
enforcement.
Other obsolete laws in the Milwaukee code which
has not been revised since 1914 are that making
it unlawful "for any person to skate with or move
by the aid of roller skates, pushmobiles, or any
noise-creating device whatsoever upon any side-
walk, street, or alley after 8 p.m.," and that provid-
ing a fine of 50 cents for each horse, mule, cow,
sheep, goat or hog found at large on the streets. A
stray goose, however, costs its owner only 25 cents,
while each offense committed by a chicken costs
$1 to $5.
Even in Ann Arbor, although its ordinances have

been more recently revised, it remains unlawful for
any person under 16 to be on the street or in any
public place after 8 p.m. and any such person
found "loitering, wandering, or rambling . . . or,
who shall or do congregate for any idle purpose
or conversation" are deemed to be disorderly per-
sons, guilty of disorderly conduct.
So considerate have the City Fathers been of
the squirrel, that even to chase one within the
city limits is an unlawful act.
With the great confusion of municipal and other
laws everywhere in need of revision and codifica-
tion it is small wonder that laws are misunder-
stood and disobeyed, that litigation is slow and
prohibitively expensive, and that confusion an(,'
differences of opinion may exist in regard to sucl,
matters as the applicability of the State Liquor
Control Act to local regulation.
Money For
TheNavy...
P RESIDENT ROOSEVELT recently
urged Congress to increase its ap-

Musical Events
FINAL WEDNESDAY
ORGAN RECITAL
Choral in D minor . . . ........... Andriesson
Benediction...................Karg-Elert
Sonata Eroica ...................... Jongen
Minuet-Scherzo .....................Jongen
May Night .......................Palmgren
Chant de Printemps ..... . ............Bonnet
Siciliane ............................. Bach
Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor ...... Bach
PALMER CHRISTIAN will appear in the final
recital of the Twilight Concert Series this
afternoon, including in his program two seasonal
sketches: one, the well known May Night of Palm-
gren, and the Chant de Printemps, a joyous expres-
sion of delight at the passing of winter. With what
has come to be known as Bach's greatest organ
work, the C minor Passacaglia and Fugue, the re-
cital will close.
RECITAL AT
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN TONIGHT
Tonight the initial concert for the benefit of the
Albert Lockwood Memorial Fund will be given by
Joseph Brinkman, pianist, in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre, at 8:15 p.m. Mr. Brinkman will play
three Beethoven Sonatas, the Pathetique, the Ap-
passionata and the Hammerklavier.

Screen Reflections
AT THE MICHIGAN
On the Stage "The Mimic World"
On the Screen "This Man Is Mine"
Tony ......................Irene Dunne
Fran .............. Constance Cummings
Jim .................... Ralph Bellamy
To stage starved Ann Arbor "The Mimic World"
is offered as an oasical relief. At the performance
witnessed the audience seemed willing to accept
anything, and laughed and applauded at the least
resemblance of a joke. As far as the imitations
of the radio, stage and screen stars went, there
were little similarities to the originals. To extend
oneself, they were junk. There were, however, two
points in the show that were good. The first was
the chorus and the second was the agile dancing
of the featured female, whose name we do not
know. The latter's body was supply and graceful
and successfully weathered many difficult rou-
tines.
In "This Man Is Mine" is found one of the few
genuinely modern and genuinely fresh domestic
comedies of the year -so far. Were it not for
the fact that men are shown as emotional weak-
lings, and that this reviewer happens to be a man
and strongly prejudiced in favor of his own sex,
all the orchids available would have been hurled
at its personnel ranging all the way from authors
Chapin and Murfin, to Director John Cromwell,
to star Irene Dunne, and to supporting cast Con-
stance Cummings, Kay Johnson, Vivian Tobin,
Ralph °Bellamy, Charles Starrett, Sidney Black-
mer, and Louis Mason.
Adapted from the play, "Love Flies in the Win-
dow," the film tells the story of a courageous wife
who deliberately throws her husband into the arms
of a former sweetheart of his to give his love for
her the acid test. Miss Dunne is excellent as the
wife who teaches her husband a lesson in fidelity.
Mr. Bellamy, following the script as best he could,
portrayed his romantic-wavering-husband role
well. From an analytical point of view the comedy
was almost perfect because of its faithful adher-
ence to a single theme and its total lack of un-
comic material. -J.C.S.
AT THE MAJESTIC
. . "YOU CAN'T BUY EVERYTHING"
Hannah .................. May Robson
Elizabeth ..................Jean Parker
Donny ....................Wm. Bakewell
May Robson wears the pants in this outfit and
if you are n May Robson fan, it's a pushover. Mor-
alistic only so far as the title goes, this film will
be a good tester of the saturation points of your
handkerchief. It is old stuff but put over in such
a way that no one minds.
Miss Robson portrays a woman who, jilted by a
young banker in her youth, has two thoughts -
to become the richest woman in the world and get
revenge. She pinches pennies, sends her crippled
son to a free clinic, all to save for the great day.
She finally has her chance, through stock manip-
ulation, to wreck the lover of her youth, only to
find out that her son and his daughter are in
love. Eventually she learns that mother-love comes
before love for money, and a gripping climax solves
her problem.
The only thing wrong with this film is that May
Robson at times tries to lay it on a little too thick.
The acting of Lewis Stone, Jean Parker, and Wil-
liam Blakewell is good. "You Can't Buy Every-
thing" is not as powerful as "Lady For A Day"
in which May Robson was perfect. But comparisons
are odious anyway, so go and see it, and have
a good cry for your money. -J.C.S.

EXPERIENCED CAST, MANY FAREWELL
PERFORMANCES IN "LITTLE LOVE"
WHAT IS BELIEVED to be one of the most ex-
perienced casts ever to appear in a campus
show has been assembled by Comedy Club for its
production tomorrow, Friday, and Saturday nights
of Vincent Wall's thousand-dollar Hopwood prize
winner, "Little Love." The play, a modern, fast-
moving comedy built about the theme of a flippant
marriage for money, necessitates light expert act-
ing; the author, a graduate student in the English
department, insisted when it was cast that parts
be given only to persons who have had a long
association with campus theatre.
Consonant with their experience, six members
of the cast will make in "Little Love" their fare-
well Ann Arbor performances. They are Ruth Hus-
sey, Grad., Barbara Van Der Wort, '34, Frances
Manchester, '34, Jay Pozz, '34, Clarence Moore,
'34L, and Lester Griffiths, Grad.
Miss Hussey, one of the leads in "Little Love,"
is something of a newcomer to the campus, having
come here this year to do graduate work in
English. She was active for four years in dramatics
at Pembroke College, Brown University, where she
did her undergraduate work, and has appeared
here this year in Comedy Club's "The Last of Mrs.
Cheyney," and Play Production's "Uncle Tom's
Cabin" and "The Round Table."
Barbara Van Der Wort, graduating in June, has
acted in four plays since she came here from Grand
Rapids at the beginning of her junior year. She
did the lead in Play Production's "Three Times The
Hour," and has also appeared in "The Last of Mrs.
Cheyney" and in Play Production's "She Stoops to
Conquer" and "Once in a Lifetime."
Frances Manchester played the leads in Play
Production's "Beggar on Horseback" and Comedy
Club's "The Last of Mr, Cheyney," two highly
successful shows, and has in addition done big parts
in "Meet the Prince," "Hay Fever," "Uncle Tom's
Cabin," in which she was Topsy, "The Round
Table," and "See Naples and Die."
Jay Pozz, another who will receive his diploma
next month, and one of the leads in "Little Love."
has appeared in the lead in a host of Ann Arbor
shows, including Play Production's "Journey's
End," "Elizabeth the Queen," "Romantic Young
Lady," "Hippolytus," and "All's Well That Ends
Well."
Lester Griffiths will be remembered for his
Simon Legree in "Uncle Tom," for his Hugo in
"See Naples and Die," and for his parts in "Once
in a Lifetime" and "Elizabeth the Queen."
Clarence Moore, leaving the Law School and Ann
Arbor in June, did one of the leads in "The Last of
Mrs. Cheyney," and has in addition had large parts
in "The Streets of New York," "Pierre Patelin,"
"Three Times the Hour," "Murray Hill," and, with
the children's theatre here, "The Pied Piper," and
"Jack and the Beanstalk."
Those in the cast who will not end their campus
careers in "Little Love" are Ann Verner, '35L, Da-
vid Zimmerman, '35, Mary Potter, '37, and Hart
Schaaf, '34.
Miss Verner, who plays one of the leads in
"Little Love," has appeared in "The Last of Mrs
Cheyney" and "Three Times the Hour."
David Zimmerman, also a lead in this week's
show, has appeared in "Elizabeth the Queen,"
"Once in a Lifetime," "Journey's End," and "Uncle
Tom's Cabin," and in leading roles in "Three Times
the Hour" and "The Last of Mrs. Cheyney."
Mary Potter and Hart Schaaf of all the cast
are new to campus dramatics. Miss Potter, a fresh-
man, has acted in one previous show here, when
she did "Truda" in the Children's Theatre produc-
tion of "The Pied Piper." Mr. Schaaf will make his
initial appearance.
THE OPERA-
Owing to the length and thoroughness of yester-
day's article on the opera, there will be no further
criticism, favorable or unfavorable, by Daily ed-
itors. We continue, however, to welcome the opin-
ions of others. -The Editors
Collegiate Observer

III
I
I

If you have a
Thesis to be

Typed

*w r

If you are
Typing theses
Advertise
through the
through
The Daily

Clas sifiedts

. .,.

CASH RATESi
IlIc aLINE

I

LONG ISTANCE
RATES ARE
SU RP RISING LY LOW
Telephone Home: Tonight!
BELOW are shown Station-to-Station Rates for
calls from Ann Arbor to representative points.
Rates to other points are proportionately low.

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
19 34 mDramatic Sasn
S WEEKS - MAY 14 through JUNE 16 - 6 PLAYS
Season Tickets
The Six Plays for $3.00, $4.00 and $6.00
Alumnx Council Office, Michigan LEAGUE Bldg.

DAY
(4:30 a.m.
7:00 p.m.)

P
O

BAY CITY .......
CHICAGO .......
DETROIT ........
FLINT ...........
GRAND RAPIDS..
IONIA ...........
JACKSON ........
KALAMAZOO ..
LANSING.
L ANSING . .. , . .. .
MT. CLEMENS....
MARQUETTE

.70 .......
1.05 ........
.30.....
.45 ........
.80......
.65 . ..
.30 .......
.70 .......
.45 ...... .

EVENING
(7:00 p.m.-
8:30 p.m.).
.55........
.90......
.30.......
.35........
.60 ........
.50 . . . . . . ..
.30 . . . . . . . .
.55........
.35 ........

NIGHT
(8:30 p.m.-
4:30 a.m.)
.35
.60
.30
.35
.40
.35
.30
.35
.3:
.35

. . . .

.45 ........

1.80.

.1.35 ........

NILES

.90

The
Michig~an
Daily
Student Publications
Building
420 Maynard Strect
Phone 2.1214

NEW YORK
PORT HURON.
PONTIAC

2.15.
.60 ...
.30.

.70 . ......,
1.80 .. .
.45 . .
.30.

.90
.45
1.20
.35
.30
.80
.60
.35

SAULT STE. MARIE 1.55.

1.15.
.85.

TRAVERSE CITY

1.15

TOLEDO ............40........35.

100

Rates to other points are proportionately low.
MICHIImo ELL

evb ._ .. __....__ _ .. _ . , _ _ _ _ . .. . _ . _..

I

By BUD BERNARD
One of the lesser members of the R.O.T.C.
at Ohio State University had been having
trouble with his teeth. It seems he finally had
to go to the dentist to have something done.
He got into the torture chair and opened his
mouth as wide as he could - and he could do
this very well. He waited but nothing hap-
pened. At last the dentist said, "Excuse me,
but you need not open your mouth any fur-
ther. I expect to stay outside while I pull the
tooth.
A professor at the University of Delaware has
decided that the dictionary is the most useless
-book in our schools. We've always known that. If
you can't spell a word you can't look it up, and if
you can spell it there's no reason for looking it up.
According to a senior at the University of
Illinois Economics professors have a hard time
putting abstract ideas in concrete heads.
College graduates make good policemen be-
cause of their sense of responsibility and bribe.-
proof intellects according to the president of the
Educational Press Association of America.
* * * A
There is the story coming from the Univer-
sity of Illinois about the nitwit who thought
"sheet music" meant snoring.

TELEPHONE

CO.

The LAST
MICIl 6NIAN

CAMPS

SALE

Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re-

of the Year!
TODAY

as the historical record of this nation, the student
possessed of both a respectable amount of patriotic
pride and common sense can hardly choose any
but the last statement, I will support my country
in anv war'."

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