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February 18, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MICHIG

N D AII

AILY

-114 a
... f.7.......

located outside the city limits. But the bigoted
attitude of certain mesmbers of the city council
has apparently sent the stui~dents out to places as
bad as those which they frequented during the
days of prohibition.
A fight occurred at the place mentioned above
the other night in which at least 10 students
participated. The proprietor of the place fired
at the students with a shotgun and some one
might have been killed or injured.
One could not conceive of such an event occur-
ring in the Union or the Tavern or the College
Inn. That is why The Daily believes, with the
Citizens' Committee, that the present vicious
'East of Division' charter, amendment should be
repealed. Let us bring beer back o' a respectable
level. Let us keep students out of dives. Sign
the repeal petitions if you are a registered voter
of the city.

-- - -- - - - -.'
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disrearded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as ;confidential upon request. Contrib tors
are asked to be brief, confining thems elves to Ifess
than 300 words if possible.
WHAT THE WORLD
NEEDS AND DOESN'T NEED
To the Editor:
What true world needs today is humanizing
humanity - kindness, truth, justice, honor and
tolerance.
What the world does not need is greed, selfish-
ness, cut-throat competition and-war, the great-
est of all crimes.
M. Levi,
Professor Emeritus

CIGARS, 70 Brands
are available at the
MICHIGAN UNION DESK
READ THE
CLASSIFIED ADS

PERSONAL STATIONER'
WfithName anal ddre ss

a1.I l"

STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE

JiE

77-= 7

_ . . _I

E=" f ^ PAd~. -u. - .
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board In,
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Westerfi Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
sociat ed allr tt .rgs
19J3 HATnI -4M covertG()1934
MEMBER OF THlE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusivey entitled t the use
for republication of. all news dispathces credited to it (r
not otherwise credited In tit paper and the local news
publishied herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the 2 ost Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, a
second class matter. Special rata of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
41.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3,75; by
mail, $4.25.
Office: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone-; 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street,. New York City; 80
Boylsen Street, sBoston;612sNorth' Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone ;4925
MANAGING EDITOR:........:THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CITY ETOR............"-....BRACKLEY SHAW
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR....... .. ART SCHAAF
SPORS EDITOR...............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
DRAA±IA EDITOR................. JOHN W. PRITCHARD
WOMEN'S EDITOR..................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball Ralph 1. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, John C. Healey, George Van Vileck, Guy M.
Whipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie
Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: Q. Bradford Cartr , Ode'0 Digt
Pal ni. Elliott, Courtney A. Evans, Thomas E. Groehn,
John Kerr, Thomas 11. Kleene, Richard E. Lorch, David,
G. Macdonald, Joel P. -Newman, Kenneth Parkr, Wi 1-
ham R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch, Robert J. St. Clair,]
Arthur S. Settle, Marshall D. Silverman, Arthur M.'
Taub.
Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanner, Florence Harper, Marie
Heid, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean,
Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Kathryn
Rietdyk, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER...........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOM~EN'S BI)SINESS MANAGER...,......t
...... .................CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-,
trick; Classifed A1yertlsing, Russell Read; AdvertisingI
Contract., ,Jack Bellamy; Advertising Servick, Robert
Ward; Account,;, Allen .nusirl; Circulation, Jack Ef-
royznson.t
ASSRSTANTS: - Meigs Bartmess, Van j unar lrn, Milton Kra-
mer, Johl Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Burgley Peggy Cady,
Vrgiaia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Iliore, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
JaAcson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonds.

New and Used

T -S

If the NRA does not succeed there are three
possible consequences. There may be another
period of depression and worse chaos, or there
may be Fascism or a government fashioned along
socialistic lines. - Prof. August Classens.

V0i di owmroi i u a__,_. ,.,,,n nm.. _,rsmi.nrA r .._

---2.

Screen Reflections

m x
AT THE MAJESTIC
"GALLANT LADY"
PLUS
Sally Wyndham-...... AnnHarding
Dan.............. ......OClive Brook
Mr. Lawerance ............. Otto-Kruger
Deedy ...... ...... .......Dnick Moore
Ann Harding's grand ability to act is portrayed
in this more or less grand picture that involves
a fine cast doing some more grand acting to make
it of the higher type of drama.
The Harding ability to take the many types
of roles that are thrust upon her is revealed in
"Gallant Lady" and her human appeal in this.
picture is bound to arouse your interest and
sympathy. Sally Wyndham has a child by an
Atlantic ocean flyer, who is killed while taking
off for Bagdad, and the problem of giving up her
child to a wealthy Mr. Lawerance and wife is
made easy by the kind assistance of Dan, a like-
able character, ex-convict, ox-doctor, whose help-
ing hand wins her friendship. Interior decora-
tion offers Sally a new lease on life and she be-
comes a success at it. Then a trip to, Italy, on
which she meets a charming Count, comes to a
bit of happiness in that she spends her return,
trip entertaining her son Dcedy, without his
knowledge of her identity, and learns that his
father is about to marry a rather hard sort of
woman. A big scene. in which Sally and this
woman makes it clear to her that her son can't
live with such a woman and she decides to marry
Mr. Lawerance. The finish is done with a light
touch that is bound to please and convince one
that it wasn't all for naught after all.
You will enjoy; Sally and Deedy's antics while
fishing, playing fireman, having general fun; the
character of P3an done in a first class manner by
Clive Brook; the sets in almostevery scene which
are done well in every detail; Dan's conversation.
with Miss Sherwood while getting Sally her job;
the fine photography taken in the park scenes.
Best shot; Sally and Deedy fishing.
The added features have come up a bit as
Paul Terry's "Three Bears" and the Two Black'
Crows' last picture are both humorous. . .. that
is from the usual run of humor in the theatre.
-R. E. L.
Musical Events
SACUITY RECITAL
THIS AFTERNOON
Prelude, Fugue, and Variation for Organ
and Piano.....................Franck
Mr. Christian and Mr. Brinkman
Carillon
Passacaglia, from Symphony No. 1 for
Organ ........... ..............Sowerby.
Mr. Christian
Prelude, Chorale, and Fugue..........Franck
Mr. Brinkman
Mediaeval Poem for organ and piano. Sowerby
Mr. Christian and Mr. Brinkman

To the Editor:
This letter, sir, is conventionally addressed to
you, but I hope that in it I may speak directly.
and personally to as many students as possible.
Young men, I have observed your academic be-
havior for years, and I find that you are alto-
gether too ready to believe what you hear. Par-
ticularly you are too ready to believe what you
wish were true, and to believe such things as
are discreditable about your teachers.
Let me illustrate. Having failed in a certain
course, after he had done about half the required
work very well and had not done the other half
at all, a student told his teacher that he had
understood that only the laboratory reports -
the part he had done - counted in determining
grades. The facts were that both parts counted,
and always had. Another boy devoted three and
a half pages of his final blue book to the first
question, which could and should have been an-
swered on half a page, and then had so little
time for the last three that all he wrote on them
did not fill one page. He said, being asked about
this unfortunate distribution, that his English
teacher had told him that one should write all
he could on any examination question. The Eng-
lish teacher had no right to speak thus on exam-
inations in subjects not his own, if indeed he
did so, and the boy, if he actually heard that
statement, should not have believed it. I said in
class today that if one should get an average of
95 he would be pretty sure to get A. A boy
immediately asked why the requirement for A
was so high. I had not said that 95 was required
for A, and in fact it is not.
A great many students seem to believe that
the class average is a safe grade. This is a dan-
gerous delusion. A boy told me not long ago that
he understood that the girls were always given
good marks because it did not matter if they
passed courses about which they knew nothing,
while for boys it was unfair to let them get into
a life work for which they were unfitted or un-
p-repared. So far as my experience goes, no such
double standard exists. I received once a very
touching letter from a student's mother. Her
boy had told her, she said, that I regularly failed
half my class. She pleaded for mercy. The facts
are that I never failed so much as one-quarter
of any class, and seldom have I failed one-eighth.
But students like to believe that teachers do
arbitrary and unreasonable things. A great field
for false and harmful beliefs is the quality an
content of courses. An otherwise intelligent boy
will act upon tips and "dope" about a course
given him by people who do not know enough
about the course to get a passing grade. Believe
me, those who get E in a course know little about
it, and their opinions are untrustworthy. I al-
ways announce and almost always keep consulta-
tion hours. Very few people come with ques-
tions about the subject, but I frequently hear of
students getting help from other students - help
which frequently proves rather a hindrance.
I wish to recommend an analytical scepticism
in the face of casual opinion. Particularly I
recommend, young men, that, if you want infor-
nmation, you go to headquarters to get it. Do not
accept as fact vagrant and irresponsible rumor,
no, not even if it is derogatory to your teachers.
Confidence in such unreliable counsel is extra
hazardous.
W. W. Sleator

BARGAIIN S IN USI
BOOKS DAMAGED BY

Everything for the Student at

ED BOOKS AND
THE RECENT FIRE.

WANCt'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTOR E

316 STATE STRE ET

A

r

-

.I

THE CLASS OF '1937

FRSH-

FOLIC

JACK MILES and His BAND OF BANDS

RI DAY, MARCH 9ut

MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM

Tickets: TWO DOLLARS

gw nro x .. .. .__ ...._... ..-: tai

Tickets On Sale at the Union, the League, Slater's, W.ahr 's,
a41d from Committee Memcbrs,

1

NIGHT EDITOR: A. ELLIS BALL

-vac

Ii

..

- _ _ _ - I

16k Persecuti n
)f Catholics.
SN its injdignation at th.e in-hunan
treatment acrded German Jews
the Hitler government, the world is apt to
Srlook the almost as harsh lot of German Cath-
ics. George N. Shuster, writing in a recent
sue of "The Commonweal," paints a picture of
ieir- distress that dispels any fond hope that
azi religious persecution might at least be con-
ned in one direction.
Mr. Shuster writes from monts of first hand
iservation; his authority i$ vouched for by the
titors of the publication in -which his article
)pears.
We learn from him that all public servants who
bscribed before 1933 to the German Catholic
sace Movement have been anathematized, po-
ically, socially, and even economically, by the
iw administration, for "to have been a pacifist
a clear title to an economic death sentence"
the hands of the new government.
According to Mr. Shuster, priests are closely re-
ricted in their sermon material; to preach criti-
ily on a subject of a remotely political nature,
'en when political action has infringed church
ghts, is to be incarcerated in a concentration'
imp. Over a hundred Catholic clergymen havel
en jailed to date -- and, as we might expect;
ider the Hitler government, there has been only
ie trial.
Most serious from the point of view .of Catholi-
sm and most intolerable from the point of view:
the American reared in the tradition of free-±
>m of religion and religious education is the;
'actical threat offered by the German govern-,
ent to the educational program of the Catholic
id also of other churches. Every young German
virtually forced to join an official Nazi "politi-
l education" group. Many of these groups op-
fly oppose all churches, and many of them'
quire attendance at a time that forces mem-,
rs to miss church seryices.
Mr. Shuster reports that as a result particu-
rly of these obstacles to ,Catholic education,
irnest Catholic parents have said bitterly to
im that they wish "their children had never
ten born.";
It is not in this way that Germany will restore'
erself in the respect of the world.

If, your impljorted date
No Ioti"ri' writes0

Ifyour dnistedate..
Won't answer the phone...
In f at, if you'rehavinga ny

TIHE Faculty Concert today will be devoted to
works for -organ and piano by two exponents
of modern music: Cesar Franck and Leo Sower-
by and played by Palmer Christian and Joseph
Brinkman. The Belgians and French both claim
ownership of Franck who, although greatly un-
appreciated during his lifetime when he was pro-
fessor of organ at the Paris conservatory, is now
known to have definitely influenced modern har-
mony and melody. Leo Sowerby, a contemporary'
of our own day, is not only American but be-{
longs more explicitly to Michigan, having been
born in Grand Rapids.
Dr. Sowerby's "Mediaeval Poem for Organ and
Piano," which brings the two artists in collabo-
ration, will undoubtedly be the most interesting
number on the program from the point of view
of the layman. It is based on a hymn from the
Liturgy of St. James and the composer has at-
tempted to transpose into music the heavenly,
vision imagined by the devout saint. Near the
end of the piece the unembellished choral appears
in the organ score and it is to be noted that the
entire tone poem is a rhapsody built around this
theme which, though Gregorian perhaps in style,
strictly belongs to Dr. Sowerby.
Ann Arbor audiences know Mr. Christian and
Mr. Brinkman, each as a soloist of the finest type;
it will be interesting to find how effective is their
playing in the unusual ensemble of piano and
organ.
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Ossip Gabrilowitsch will conduct the Detroit
Symphony Orchestra at its annual concert in Ann

Collegiate Observer
An economics professor at the University
of California recently made -the following
statement: "Hats have become degraded. Why
a woman thinks she looks alluring in a cold
pancake is beyond me."
* * *
All fraternities were r e c e n t 1 y abolished at
Queen's College, Kingston, Ontario, by mandate
of the Alma Mater society executive. Member-
ship in a fraternity was made an indictable of-
fense and penalties were provided for.

Fifty students at the University
two professors in a room and
then- out until they promised to
class without an examination.

of Spain locked
would not let
pass the whole

It is reported by Professor Jumblewitt of
John Doe University that the knights of yore
used baby dragons for cigarette lighters.
Huron College, situated in London, Ontario, is
probably the smallest college in existence today.
It carries an enrollment of 20 students and five
faculty members.
Add this to your list of definitions: Liquor-
an excuse for behaving as you'd like 'to when
sober, but don't dare.
-Indiana Daily
* *
FROM OUR CONTEMPORARIES
While a collge man is getting a liberal edu-
cation, his father is getting an education in
liberality. -Daily Illini

ep The Students,
it Of The Dives .

RYS on the Ann Arbor Common

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