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April 22, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TX THE MICHIGAN DAILY NAI

V, A

Soviet Leaders
Preparing For
WarWith Jpan
President Kalinin Calls For
Training Of Women And
Children
Says Many People
IIaV(e Lost Viollatie,
Banllers Proclaim T h a t
imperialists Prepare For
War With Soviet
MOSCOW, April 21. - U) -- Under
the lash of President Michael Kalinin,
Soviet leaders pushed forward today
a vast program for defense against
war.
Returning from a country-wide l
tour, the president struck at the vul-
nerable spots in Russia's defensive

First Diesel Electric Streamline Train Is Christened

Speakers Of
National Note
Here Sunday,
(Continued from Page 1)
Methodist Church, who regards Dr.
Wilson as the votintry'x best -in-
formed authority on temperence, will
introduce him to the congregation.
"Dr. Wilson is a dynamic speaker
and a shrewd observer," said Dr.
Fisher, "and his presentation prom-
ises to be an enthusiastic but
thoughtful survey of the future pro-
gram of the dry forces." The support
of several local organizations has
been enlisted for this service to which
the general public is invited.
Dr. Fisher will preach at 10:45 a.m.
on the subject "Leo Tolstoy Imitates
Christ." This is the second of a series
of sermons on the general theme
'Christ Confronted by Modern Social
Philosophies" which will be given
during April and May at the morn-
ing services.
Dr. Charles F. Banning of
Richmond Hill Baptist Church, New
York City, will speak at 10:45 at the
First Presbyterian Church on "Do We
Need Religion?" Many students of
New York University and Columbia
attend Dr. Banning's church, which
is in the heart of New York City, and
his views are expected to be of great
importance to students of this cam-
pus.
In addition to his own church
work, Dr. Banning has been, for three
years, chairman of the New York
State Young People's Commission, a
trustee of the New York City Fed-
eration of Churches and a director
of the Long Island Extension So-
ciety.
At 10:45 a.m. Prof. Carl E. Guthe
of the anthropology department will
speak on "An Anthropologist Looks at
Leisure," at the Unitarian Church.
"New Ideals For the New Deal" will
be the title of the address by Prof.
Wesley H. Maurer of the journalism
department. He will speak at 7:30
p.m.
The usual Sunday form will be
carried out at St. Andrews Episcopal
Church beginning with Holy Com-
munion at 8 a.m. The sermon will
be delivered by the Rev. Henry Lewis,

minister of the church. The student
meeting to be held at Harr-is HAll:it
i p.m. will have Prof. Erich A. Wad-
speaker.
"Interpreters and Dissenters of
Naziism" will be the title of the ad-

dress to be givens at 11:15 by Dr. IBer-
nard lHellci'at,. the Hfillel Foundation.
At S :15 p0m. (hei'e will be 'in open
tiiom ill w\hWichJamrles Davtis, '36, will
dcelivcr a paper on "The Effects of
Anti-Nazi Boycott on German
Trade."

I

armor. He urged particularly in a
call published in the newspaper La
Pravda the training of women and
children "and others not fit for mil-
itary service" to carry on should their
men be called to fight.
"Some think," President Kalinin
said, "that since war has not yet
been proclaimed against the Soviet'
Union it will not be done at all. Those
so thinking have lost their vigilance."
He condemned rural Soviets for
their inactivity in training women,
children and men not physically cap-
able of going to war "to carry out the
work of the collective farms when all
able-bodied persons are mobilized."
Lending impetus to the drive to
emphasize the need for preparedness,
hundreds of slogans are being pre-
pared for use in May day celebra-
tions.
"Imperialists are preparing new
wars against the U.S.S.R.," one reads,
and there are others such as: "Jap-
anese imperialists are organizing
anti-Soviet provocations in the far
east"; "Workers, peasants, Red sol-
diers, strengthen the defenses of our
country. Long live the far-eastern
Red army."
Oriental Crisis Nears
NANKING, China, April 21.- (R)
-Despite reassurances by the Nation-
alist government, heightened ten-
sion between Japan and China be-
come apparent today.
The question of Japan's so-called
Asiatic "Monroe doctrine" was placed
flatly at the doors, of the ministry
of foreign affairs in the shape of a
demand from the legislative Yuan to
be informed what is going on in the
high places.
Wang Ching-Wei, foreign minister,
appeared personally before them and
gave definite assurance that neither
Chang Kai-Shek, head of the govern-
ment, nor Huang Fu, commissioner
for North China, was "paying any
attention" to Japan's recent hands-
off China pronouncement.

-Associated Press Photo
The nation's first Diesel electric streamline train, shown here, was formally christened in a Phila-
delphia ceremony attended by some of America's leading industrialists. Built for use by the Chicago, Bur-
lington and Quincy railroad, the train accommodates 72 passengers and is capable of traveling more than
100 miles an hour.

-
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FRANCIS
PHOTO C
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1

I
40

Rally Planned
Tomorrow On
Public Works,

Slisser Praises Watercolor
Exhibits At Detroit And Chicago

Southworth
Meeting In
Of County

To Address
Court Room
Building

The campaign being carried on in
Washtenaw County in support of the
$37,000,000 public works bond issue,
which will be voted on by the people
of the State April 30, will reach a
high point in a rally to be held at 8
p.m. tomorrow in the court room of
the county building.
Speakers at the meeting will include
Tracy Southworth of Lansing, head
of the Employment Recovery Council,
George J. Burke, congressional dis-
trict chairman, and Albert J. Parker,
in charge of the drive.
The measure provides for the ex-
penditure of $3,255,000 in Washtenaw
County, to be used for alterations,
additions, and construction of new
units at the State Psychopathic Hos-
pital here and the Ypsilanti State
Hospital.
Eligibility to vote in this election
is extended only to those who own
real or personal property that is as-
sessed for taxes in Michigan. Any-
one married to, or in partnership with,
a persons holding such property is
also eligible.
MacArthur Wants
LargerArmy Bill
WASHINGTON, April 21.- (P) -
Giving his "unqualified approval" to
a bill to add 48,000 men to the army,
Gen. Douglas MacArthur,chief-of-
staff, told a house military affairs
sub-committee Friday that the mea-
sure "seeks to remedy one of the most
glaring, critical defects of our military,
establishment."
The bill introduced by Represen-
tative Thompson (Dem., Tex.), would
direct an increase in army enlisted
men from 118,750 to 165,000 and the
officer personnel from 12,000 to 14,-
063.
"Enactment of this bill would en-
hance the security of the United
States," MacArthur asserted. "It
would lift the American army above
the danger line; give us an opportu-
nity to rehabilitate thousands of
young men who are now suffering the
results of the economic depression."

Chicago's Thirteenth International
Water Color Exhibition at the Art
Institute, and the present two art
exhibitions in Detroit, that of Amer-
ican water colors at the Museum of
Art, and the Independent Exhibition
in thesHudson Auditorium, are all
rated as fine collections, well worth
seeking, by Prof. Jean Paul Slusser,
assistant professor of drawing and
painting in the College of Architec-
ture.
Professor Slusser returned last
week from a tour of the three ex-
hibits.
"The Chicago exhibit," he says, "is
the event of the season. The Chicago
Art Institute has been successful in
its attempt to do for water colors
what the Carnegie Institute at Pitts-
burg has done for oil painting. Many
nations, including the United States,
England, France, Germany, Spain,
Russia and Belgium are represented,
and such eminent painters as Au-
gustus John of England, George Grosz
of Germany and Lucien Simon, Raoul
Dufy and Georges Roualt of France
have pictures on display."
In speaking critically of the exhibit,
Professor Slusser said: "This year's
show is lively, varied, and especially
notable for its freshness and vitality
of viewpoint. There is a general ab-
sence of the conventional water col-
ors one usually sees at such an ex-
hibit. The tendency seems to be to-
wards fewer sketches from nature
and more interpretive works which
give vent to the artists' own impres-

sions. Landscapes predominate, all
three prize-winning pictures being of
this type."
The Detroit water color display,
a dealer's show from New York, al-
though small and lacking the variety
of the Chicago display, is of high
quality, Professor Slusser said, pre-
senting the works of some of the best
known water colorists in the coun-
try such as Burchfield, Hopper, Marin
and Zorach.
Detroit's Independent Exhibition
has been described as a big "free-for-
all" containing some good work and
a great deal of a poor degree. A large
share of the paintings are done by
amateurs, a few from Ann Arbor but
mostly from Detroit and vicinity.
While the art display is classed as
"conservative" by Professor Slusser,
he states that every conceivable ob-
ject is drawn upon.
Film Showing Test Run
Will Be Given Monday
A sound film recording the 25-
hour endurance run made by Ab Jen-
kins, famous racing driver, in a
Pierce - Arrow stock car several
months ago will be shown under the
auspices of the Transportation Club
and the student branch of the
A.S.M.E. at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, in
Room 348 West Engineering Building.
Jenkins will be present in person
at the showing of the film.

[ey're surprisingly easy
th the fast Kodak "SS"
oto bulbs.
thal's our business
CO BOYCE
COMPANY

108 East Liberty

,!

I

M

1

E OnIM-14

q

look at these Sunday
specials fingewrle ffer

St MIkfed
Chicken Fricassee
with Home Made Noodles 19c

Grilled
Top Sirloin Steak
Butter Gravy 19c

11

Hear MR. JACK KELLMAN of E. LTrr7 Inc.
LECTURE on
"THE LEICA CAMERA"
Monday, April 23 at 7:30 P.M.

""i

better foods at more reasonable prices .

4)

(I

Delicious
Turkey a la King
with fresh mushrooms 15c'

Breaded
Veal Tenderloin
Steak 15c

Room 2054,

Natural Science Building

Under te auspices of the Forestry Club.
All interested are invited.

most other food portions are five cents .. .

FRESH
STRAWBERRY
SUNDAE

C aIkins.Fletcher Drug Co.
324 South State Street
Distributors of Leica Cameras and Accessories

Baked
Virginia Ham
"Swift's premium" 15c

Prime
Roast of Beef
"Pan Gravy" 15c

11

-1
mmmom

.i1
ML

home baked pies and cakes

five cents a cut

Continuing SLATER'S Gigantic Spring

15c

Other Fountain Features-
4 FRESH LIMEADE... 10c
" FRESH LEMONADE.. 10c
FRESH ORANGEADE l0c
North University at Thayer
Phone 9797

Clearance

Sale

Grilled
Beef Tenderloin
Steak 15c-

Hungarian
Beef Goulash
14c

dancing in the den cellar nine until eleven

Bargains On All Merchandise

Come In And Browse

the den.
,t 1 108 South University

fi ngerle
operated

the tavern
338 Maynard Street

M I
:

i

/y

fI

Alex
Says-

C

t! tr

K1

ce,
,.-

4 %

11

R&S
Lunch

that he

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