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April 22, 1934 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, APRIL 2

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
r- arm=--_rc ,

Musical Events

Screen Reflections

Pulished every 'orning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student, Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
$.oiated _____giteres_
~a1933(.'iOaNAL cjit m;;;;194
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the us
for republication of all news dispathes credited to It o
not otherwise credited in th; paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Enteredat the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
81 scripti tiduring umrner ab carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25,
Offices: Student Pubicatis Bulding, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatis,
Inc., 4C East Thit.y-Fourth, Street, New York .City; -So
Boylson Street- Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR..........THOMAS . CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............. HARTN SHAA
CITY EDITOR....................BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTSEDITOR...............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
DRAMA EDITOR ................ JOHN4 W. PRITCHARD
WOMEN'S EDITOR....................CAROL J. HANAN
]RIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Bal, Ralph G. Coulter. William
G. Ferris, John C, Healsy, George Van Vleck, E Jerome
Pettit.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: arjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Mare Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J Flaherty, Thomas A. Groehn,
"John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
G. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch,
Arthur S. Settle, Jacob C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub.
Dorothy Ge, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnson. Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ...........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER ..............-----
........................... CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuus;Circula-
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson. -
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer. John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbard. George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursiy, Peggy Cadys
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Florez, Doris Oimy, Betty.Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simond.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker. Robert Owen, Ted Wohlgemui, Jerome
Grossman, Avn'r, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hal,
Ross Levin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Hardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
NIGHT EDITOR: JOHN C. HEALEY
Ar - ~ - -
The Rockefeller
'Grant.. .
T HE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION
of the School of Business Adminis-
tration last year have secured commercial positions
either through the school or on their own initiative.
This year Prof. Ernest M. Fisher, who is in charge
of placements for graduates, predicts that the per-
centage will be raised to nearly a perfect record.
With the receipt of the appropriation there
comes the realization that Science, served by thou-
sands of tireless workers pushing forward on fronts,
more trying than Belleau Wood, must move al-
ways forward if civilization is to continue.
In respect to the fund given for archeology, let
us call to mind that past researches along these
lines have brought forth gems of literature, and
architecture, and that lurking ever behind the
impenetrable curtain of the unknown lies new
works which may give joy to generations yet to
come.
If mitigation of human suffering and trans-
portation of human minds away from the present
to a glorious world of literature and art are worthy
objectives for a man to have, surely Mr. Rocke-
feller, in making these and countless other similar
gifts is acting as a great force for the good.
The gratitude of Michigan for being allowed to
help in Mr. Rockefeller's work is sincere.

Employment Of
Michigan Graduates...
TINETY per cent of the graduates
JAof the graduates of the School 'of
Business Administration last year have secured
commercial positions either through the school
or on their own initiative. This year Prof, Ernest
M. Fisher, who is in charge of placements for
graduates, predicts that the' percentage will be
raised to nearly a perfect record.
It is indicative of three things to note this
development. First, that business in general is
definitely on the upturn, as we have heard for
some time now but have hesitated to believe, and
that banks and large commercial and industrial
firms are feeling the need for young men in
their organizations.

%xAMBER MUSIC
RECITAL THIS AFTERNOON
Tempo- Decide from the Double
Concerto for piano and violin
soli with string accompaniment . . Chausson
Larghetto Affettuoso from the
Brandenburg concerto No. 5 for piano,
flute and violin soli .:.........J. S. Bach
Anime et Tres Decide from the String
Quartet in G minor ................ Debussy
Sonata Facile for piano solo with Chamber
orchestra .................Mozart-Grieg
Allegro, Andante, Rondo
Cruise. A Mediterranean Rhapsody for
Chamber orchestra ................Pilois
On a sunny day-with full sails - carefree Italy
- solemn Greece
Allegro non troppo from the Sextet in
G mir}or for two violins, two violas
and two celli .................... Brahms
Allegro Animato from Op. 81, for piano,
harp and strings .................. Dvorak
The members of the Chamber music class par-
ticipating in this program are: Winifred Arthur,
David Burchuk, Frederick Baessler, Charlotte
Chambers, Ann Farquhar, Charles Gilbert, Doris
Hamill, Howard Hathaway, Alice Hoffman, Mona
Hutchings, Margaret Kimball, Everett Kisinger,
Sarah Lacey, Theodore Lee, Elizabeth Leslie, Ma-
retta Martinek, Loren Maynard, Kenneth Norman,
Abe Osser, Emilie Paris, Ruby Peinert, Vlasta
Podoba, Lyle Shumate, Harry Siegel, Edwin Stein,
Gretchen Wollenberg, Benton Yates.
THE RECITAL of the Chamber Music class,
under the direction of Professor Hanns Pick,
provides for both the intimate type of chamber
music, the Mozart Sonate, Bach Trio, Debussy
Quartet, and Brahms Sextet, for example, and
the complex type for a "chamber orchestra," here,
for instance, the Chaussin Double Concerta, Pillois
Rhapsody and the Movement from Dvorak's Quin-
tet, op. 81. The latter type of chamber music is
particularly favored by composers of a recent era,
since it came into existence to bridge the gap be-
tween "room-music for the small circle" and "con-
certs for a symphony audience." The Pillois Rhap-
sody is a fine specimen of this kind of "intimate
music for a larger crowd." The composition was
written in July 1932 and has been performed only
twice: at the Westchester Festival and last summer
at Chautauqua. The music is still in manuscript
and was made available through the courtesy of
the French composer, who is now living in this
country.r
Another excellent example of the more elaborate
type of chamber music is the concerto for Violin
and Piano with String accompaniment by another
Frenchman, Chausson. The soli will be played by
Emilie Paris and Elizabeth Leslie. The third of this
category, the Dvorak, has been especially arranged
for this recital for a large group of players from the
piano quintet in A major. The harp has been added
to lend more color to the ensemble. Margaret
Kimball will perform the piano part and Ruth
Pfohl the harp.
In contrast to these three numbers are the deli-
cate slow movement for Piano,- Flute and Violin
of Bach, to be interpreted by Gretchen Wollen-
berg, Edwin Stein and Charlotte Chambers; the1
impressionistic string quartet by Debussy; and the
lovely string sextet of Johannes Brahms.
There is growing a decided interest in chamber,
music, and the opportunity to hear such a well-
planned and colorful recital is most welcome.
-Sally Place.
MUsic and Drama
UNION OPERA
WILL SATIRIZE CAMPUS
By JOHN W. PRITCHARD
ANENT THE J.G.P., I recently made some unkind
remarks about campus satires. I now wish to
retract those remarks, because, if the rest of the
student body is in the same mood as that in which
I find myself, it is about time for someone to give us
a good laugh at our own expense. Our stomach
muscles are atrophied, our collective ego sated and
rapidly growing sterile. We are ripened, in fact, for
a good sneer session, and that appears to be
what the Union Opera is going to present to us,
beginning Tuesday night.
The subtitle of "With Banners Flying" is "A
Series of Burlesques Michigana." It will, according

to advance reports, satirize everything connected
with the University, from the beer situation to
the long-haired student with a predilection for
waving red flags. It thus will have (if predictions
are realized) the distinction of being the first pure
college show presented here in a number of sea-
sons.
This, of course, will be a strong attempt to revive
the old spirit which made the Union Operas such
immensely popular affairs. "With Banners Flying"
is the keynote as well as the title. It will be, it
would seem; good husky, rah-rah stuff .. .
But perhaps this statement is going too far. For,
in the pre-statements of those connected with the
opera, we find a number of points that seem to in-
dicate that the show is going to be a real show, and
not just an evening of disconnected belly-laughs,
void of any touches of urbanity. "The authors
and the composer," say those who know, "have
collaborated to give a show that has a true plot,
instead of the bare skeleton upon which the music
might be planned. With the same thought in mind,
the dance routines, comedy roles, and costumes
have been designed to contribute to the whole ex-
cellence of the opera, rather than to star unrelated
specialty numbers in the style of a revue, or to
present spectacular tableaux."
Now, so far as I am able to deduce from what
data is given, what we are to see in the 1934 Union
Opera is a very efficient combination of the best
points of all the operas of the past, with emphasis

Al Wonder .................... Al Jolson
Inez .....................Dolores Del Rio
Harry .................. Ricardo Cortez
"Wonder Bar" is massive, gathering strength
by its clever interplay of individual close-ups with
mass group ensembles, building up in intensity and
intrigue to the expected climax and then gentlyj
subsiding into darkness, peace, and tranquility.
Following the usual type of story constructed to
give this type of music-cinema its continuity, the
entire action of the piece takes place within Al
Wonder's "Wonder Bar" in the course of one eve-
ning, curiously adhering to the classic unities of
place and time. Inez, a dancer at this Paris night
club, is madly infatuated with Harry, her partner.
He, however, is tired of her and is playing around
with a prominent banker's wife. Jealously insane,
Inez deliberately plunges a knife into Harry's heart
at the conclusion of their turn. Al loads the body
into the car of a ruined speculator who, he knows,
is about to drive his car over a precipice, commit-
ting suicide and covering up the crime. This is the
bare outline of the plot.
The dance creations of Busby Berkley deserve
special mention for their originality and fluidity.
The peculiar medium of the screen is particularly
adapted to his genius of picturing movement that
is graceful despite the great numbers of dancers in-
volved.
The most interesting feature of this film is the
elaborateness and good construction in the special
numbers of "Going to Heaven on a Mule" and
"Waltz of Love." In the latter Al Jolson does his
old black-face act in a very vivid paradise of
negroes. His trip down the Milky Way along with
his mule embellished with wings is amusing and
easily the high spot of the film.
-JC.S.

AT THE MAJESTIC
"WONDER BAR"

Read The
DAILY
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FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AND TRUST COMPANY
Established 1863
Oldest National Bank
In Michigan
Every Banking Service Available
Domestic - - - Foreign
Under U. S. Government Supervision
Membe Federal Reserve System

pg-
1i - _-

The Twentieth Book in Harpers Monthly Pulpit

CAN

I

KNOW

GOD?

REV. FREDERICK B. FISHER
WAHR' S OOKSTORES

Washington
Off The Record

By SIGRID ARNE
SENATOR ASHURST of Arizona was having "job
trouble." A constituent was pounding his desk
and shouting because he felt the senator had failed
to give him attention.
"I've voted for you time and again," shouted the
man, "but you can bet this next time I won't."
"Thanks for warning me," said the unruffled
Ashurst, "I'll have to arrange to win without you."
Mrs. Roosevelt frequently gets into the White
House elevator and operates it herself.
W HEN GEN. HUGH S. JOHNSON has time for
a mellow mood he usually gets sentimental
over the beauties of the Rio Grande valley where
he did much of his youthful soldiering,
"When I get through with all this, that's where
I'm going," he says; "down where the owls make
love to the chickens, and it's starry and quiet and
peaceful."
JIMMY "SCHNOZZLE" DURANTE rather sur-
prised the commissioners of the District of
Columbia when he arrived here for a visit.
He brought his own "key to the city" with him,
handed it to Commissioner George E. Allen,
and then requested Allen to hand it back.
"Wanted to be sure you had one," explained Du-
rante.
Evidently the souvenir hunters are still working.
After a conference President Roosevelt missed a
cigarette lighter from his desk in the executive
offices.
CLARENCE DARROW was addressing a large au-
dience of woman's club members. He was
speaking of his new job on the advisory research
board for the NRA.
When he finished the toastmistress brought a
puzzled look from Darrow and a gasp from the
audience by saying, "I've heard Mr. Darrow many
times, and never before has he let me down or
disappointed me."
Darrow fiddled with his watch and a few nervous
women reached for handkerchiefs. The toastmis-
tress continued:
"Never before has he failed to throw back his
coat and stick his thumbs in his suspenders."
Mrs. Mary Connor, democratic national com-
mittee woman from Kentucky, has attracted at-
tention here with her wit.
One day after closing some business with gov-
ernment agencies she was seen rushing down a
Washington street checking a list.
"Where to?" she was asked.
"Oh, I'm torn between CWA and C.O.D.," she
said. "And C.O.D. won. Spring's here and I've got
to have a hat."
RUMOR has had Alice Roosevelt Longworth
"engaged" more times than almost any other
single American woman.
Just now the gossips are busy becausebshewas
seen at a social gathering with Gov. Albert C.
Ritchie of Maryland, who is considered one of the
country's most eligible bachelors.
When Mrs. Longworth is confronted with the
rumors she laughs and exclaims, "Just the peren-
nial rubbish."
SENATOR ELBERT B. THOMAS of Utah is one
of the two members of the Senate who has
been a college professor.
He is taking some joshing" on that score since he
is still in the Senate - not as a member of the
"brain trust."

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS ADS ARE EFFECTIVE
HURRY!1
There are still a few' ticket available
for the
MILITARY BALL
UNION APRIL 27 . v
''r'edman
antiMs fmoas
ORCH ESTRA
$"3.00
Al Unin, R.O.TRC. Headquarters, r.
dalfours, and Comnittee

I

TI
S

l E 1934

'I/kl

1.

J1

IT

}

is Li guished Players
istinguished Pr oductiois
'IX PLAYS

'1111lF

DANCE

FLORENCE REED and ITat KEITH In.
LEONTOVICH in . . . . .. . . . . . . . .
VIOLET KEMBLE-COOPER i . .. .
WALTER SLEZAK in... .......

nIECIrA S
..... .......Macbe/
. .... And So To Bed"
..The Bron/es" and
"The Shining Hour
"Meet My Sister"

GLORIA BLONDELL in.............She Loves Me Not"
together with such distinguished artists as
ELIZABETH RISDON, OLIVE OLESON, ROLLO PETERS, JESSIE
BUSLEY, AUDREY RIDGEWELL, and other

'JX I

New York players, and

I.

The Famous Dancers
CHARLES WEIDMAN and Dorius HUMPHREY

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