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April 05, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Expect Council
Action On Two
Liquor Clauses
Meeting Tonight To Take
Up 500-Foot Restrictiol,'
Closing Hour Ruling
Two clauses in the Ann Arbor
Liquor Ordinance arehexpected to be
definitely completed at the City
Council meeting tonight.
The Ordinance committee will
probably recommend to the council
that it permit unlimited sale of liquor
in the downtown area with a restric-
tion of 500 feet elsewhere through-
out the city. The continuance of the
Division Street restriction by Mon-
day's election may, however, brin;
the council to reduce the distance to
300 feet.
Action is expected on the closing
hour clause. The State Liquor Control
Commission ruled last week that loaa1
authorities could not in any way alter
the State 2 a.m. closing hour. This
will probably cause the council to
strike out its midnight closing clause.
Tonight's meeting dwil e the last
for four retiring aldermen: William
C. Hollands, First Ward; Walter L.
Kurtz, Second Ward; Leigh H.
Thomas, Third Ward and William H.
Faust, Sixth Ward.
The new aldermen will be sworn
in by City Clerk Fred C. Perry next
Monday, and will be in attendance at
the Council at the next meeting May
16.
American Policy IS
Blamed For Recent
Uprisings In Cuba
That American imperialism has
been responsible for the strife in Cuba
is the view of Walter Relis, National
Student League member who has just
returned from a three months' trip
throughout the island, and who spoke
recently in Natural Science Audito-
rium on "Students in the Cuban Rev-
olution."
He traced the rise of political and
economic unrest in Cuba since the
accession of Machado to the presi-
dency in 1925, saying that Machado
was only the tool of large American
sugar and power interests.
"Students," said Relis, "took a lead-
ing role in the revolution. Such re-
forms as have been accomplished are
due to them and to the organized
workers of the country."
Robbins Compiles Books'
On Parliament, Barset
Dr. Frank E. Robbins, assistant to
the President, has just completed a
chronology of the Barset and Parlia-
mentary novels of Anthony Trollope,
which he has entitled "A Trollopian
Chronology. It was highly praised by
William Lyon Phelps in an article ap-
pearing in the most recenu Scriber's.

Congress Pays Final Tribute To Pou, DenI Of House

Harvard Freshmen
Favor Abolition Of
compulsory Sports
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 4. -
Seventy-five freshmen signed a peti-
tion recently favoring the abolition of
compulsory athletics for Harvard
freshmen. At least 50 more students
expressed a desire for a change in the
present system, but they were unwill-
ing to advocate outright abolition.
Present regulations tgoverning
freshman athletics provide for com-
pulsory exercise at least three times
a week. Students who signed the pe-
tition said that they considered three
hours of compulsory exercise as
prep-schoolish."
Other students endorsed the "ath-
letics for all" program, but they said
that the compulsory feature was a
great inconvenience at times because
of scholastic duties. Individual de-
termination of time and amount of
exercise was the desire of all stu-
dents questioned.
FERA Workers To Aid
In Cleaning Of Campus
FERA student workers will work
side by side with the regular build-
ings and grounds laborers during the
spring cleaning of the University
campus this vacation, according to
Edward C. Pardon, superintendent of
the Buildings and Grounds Depart-
ment.
The work will consist of the usual
raking of the grounds, washing win-
dows, and redressing of trees. Mr.
Pardon stated that there are certain
elm trees around campus that are
now infected, a condition which must
be remedied immediately.

Two Books Are
Issued By Men
InMathematics
Life Insurance Treatise Is
Published By Menge And
Glover Of Department
Two publications, written by three
members of the mathematics depart-
ment, both books which are being
utilized in the classroom, have been
issued this year, according to Prof.
H. C. Carver, of the mathematics de-
partment.
"An Introduction to the Mathe-
matics of Life Insurance" was the
title of a booklet written by Profes-
sors James W. Glover and Walter C.
Menge published in January of this
year. "Correlation And Sampling,"
a pamphlet, was also published by
Prof. William D. Baten.
It was further announced that the
combined examinations of the Actu-
ary Society of America, and the
American Institute of Actuaries will
be held April 16 to 20. Students who
sent in applications early this spring
are eligible for fellowship in either
society, or both, depending upon ex-
aminations chosen.
"The examinations constitute a
LIVE in FRENCH
Residential Summer School (co-educa-
tional) June 27-Aug. 1. Only French
spoken. Fee $150. Board and Tuition.
Elementary, Intermediate, Advanced.
Write for circular to Secretary, Residen-
tial French Summer School
McGILL UNIVERSITY
Montreal, Canada

recognized aid fo ofuturc positions in
actuarial work," said Theodore E.
Raiford, instructor in mathematics.
The difficulty of these examinations
may be realized when it is seen that
out of approximately 30 who applied
for a fellowship last year, only two,
or about .06 per cent, passed the test
successfully.
See
for
OFFICE SUPPLIES
302 S. State St.
.you want extra
dolarsfor your
e1 J
Go By Greyhound
Take a Greyhound bus this va-
cation . . . you'll save precious
dollars and have a comfortable,
time-saving trip.
Round Trip Fares
NEW YORK CITY.....$16.20
BOSTON .............20.70
PITTSBURGH... ........9.45
CLEVELAND..........6.30
BUFFALO ............. 9.00
CHICAGO............6.00
John Bollock
Mich. Union Ph. 4151
Bill O'Neil
The Parrot Ph. 4636

-Associated Press Photos
Members of the Senate, the House of Representatives and the Supreme Court joined in a final tribute
to Rep. Edward W. Pou of North Carolina, dean of the House who died of a heart attack. Vice-President
Garner and Speaker Rainey may be seen on the rost um of the House chamber, back of the flower-banked
casket.

'ivil Service
Jobs 'Opened'
For Students
Examinations Announced
For Posts In National
Museum, Warehouses
Announcements of Civil Service
examinations for three positions have
been received by the University Bu-
reau of Appointments and Occupa-
tional Information from the United
States Civil Service Commission,
Washington, D.C. Offices which are
open are that of junior scientific aid
in textile arts at the National Mu-.
seum. Smithsonian Institution and
associate and assistant associate
warehouse examiners in cotton, pea-
nuts, and grain. .
Applicants for the position as jun-
ior scientific aid in textile arts must
have completed 14 units of high school
work acceptable for college entrance
and must have either one year of
museum experience in textile arts or
in the use of textiles in interior dec-
orating, or have completed one year
in a college of recognized standing in
that line of work. Applications for the
position, which pays $1,440 a year,
must be on file with the United States
Civil Service Commission at Washing-
ton not later than April 18, 1934.
One thing is very certain. We are
not going back either to the old con-
ditions or to the old methods.-Pres.
Roosevelt.

Calif ornia Sophomores
To Educate Freshmen
The revival of hazing as a means
of bringing back class spirit received
a setback, when sophomores at the
University of California met to or-

ganize a new honor society which will
serve to educate freshmen to the ad-
vantages of their class customs.
The new fratcrn;y plans to de-
velop a rebirth of class pride by aid-
ing the freshmen to organize and by
developing an active interest in extra-
curricular activities.

t ___ ____ ___

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