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April 05, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

--: 1 l L "AL1 VGA 1 1MV 11 1\ j, 11T1 V

1 .i

MICHIGAN DAILY Michigan Gets
A New Telescope.. .
MICHIGAN is keeping up with the
parade of progress. Universities
_ (he world over are constantly improving their
= s -. scientific equipment. A recent trend has been in
- 19gigantic telescopes. And this week witnessed the
pouring of the mirror for a new telescope for
Michigan - an 34-inch reflector, the third largest
in the world.
For years the Michigan astronomy department
under Dr. Heber D. Curtis has ranked among
the best nationally. Its courses and its teachers
have been nowhere surpassed.
every morning except Monday during t Until now, however, it has not had very abun-
ear and Summer Sessou by the Board in dant technical equipment. The new telescope is
tudent Publications E at last something commensurate with the de-
the Western Conference 1Edt rial A : ilof artmn' aiiy
ren News Service.artment's ability.
Wsooiated Pout putt r Michigan students may well be proud of their
Of -=' institution's astronomical division.
A RI At l r ."Z£

-- - - -
Musical Events
VOICE GRADUATION
RECITAL
Lungi dal caro bene................ . Sarti
Rendi l'sereno al ciglio.............. Handel
My Lovely Celia ..................... Munro
Clavelitos ........................Valverde
Verbogenheit........................Wolf
Wie Melodien....................Brahms
Feldeinsamkeit...................Brahms
InZitternden Mondlicht ............. .Haile
Die Nacht ........................Strauss
Zeugnung .........................Strauss
Beau Soir-.........................Debussy
Claire de lune............ ...........Szulc
I preuvait ............ ........... Massanet
Crepuscule-................ ...... Massanet
Ouvre tes yeux bleus............Massanet
Black Roses......Sibelius
The First Kiss...................Sibelius
The Fuschia Tree.................Quilter
Siesta...........................Besley
Wild Bird.....................Greenfield
MARGARET SWETNAM will be assisted by
Margaret Kimball, pianist, and by Janet Wil-
loughby, harpist, in the group of French songs.
The program as a whole, covering four languages
and as many "schools" demands musicianship as
well as technique.
ORGAN GRADUATION RECITAL
In Review
KATHERINE FUNKHAUSER gave a most cred-
itable recital yesterday afternoon. Her first
degree was from the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts and not the School of Music. Con-
sequently it is especially gratifying to find that
a practical interest in music can be something
more than a hobby, and that by concentration a
graduate degree can be earned in a field outside
the center of a previous interest.
Miss Funkhauser performed the opening Bach
Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C admirably, the
high spot in the Toccata was the famous pedal
passage comfortably executed. She built up the
Adagio; and followed the Fugue with her "eye on
the ball," with the result that it had a thorough-
ness and solidity that was particularly desirable.
The Karg-Elert, to show that Miss Funkhauser
has an aptitude for a different kind of applica-
tion than was required in the Franck, Weitz and
Mailengreau, was kept a pastel with the pale dis-
sonances carefully breathed. Miss Funkhauser
brought her program to a joyous close with the
Widot Finale. The playing of the organ must
be more than a punching of buttons; this recital
is greatly to Miss Funkhauser's credit, in that her
control of the potential power was more than a
process of grabbing for the nearest stop. She
knew what she wanted.
creen Refecions
AT THE LYDIA MENDELSSON
"THE ROAD TO LIFE"
MINUS
(ART CINEMA LEAGUE)
The above evaluation is one over which I puz-
zled long. I should, if possible, have preferred to
place the rating about midway between two and
three stars. In its mass effect, "The Road to
Life" acts like a pile-driver; but technically it is
rather a cranky machine, filled with flaws and
halts. Nevertheless, it is a pile-driver, rugged
and crude in its construction, but endowed with
immense power. It is also, in a sense, like a vast
army - officered by good lieutenants and cap-
tains, weak majors, a few very foul colonels, and
highly strategic generals-which overcomes sheer-
ly by the power of mass action, despite unitary
vagaries. Replace technical flaws with technical
excellencies, and you will have a four-star cinema.
"The Road to Life" details the work of the
Soviet government in reclaiming hoodlums and
making good citizens of them. But it is not
merely instructive propaganda; it is a story, not
of individuals, but of a movement. There are
individual personalities injected--too many of
them, in fact -but it is the personality of the
whole movement that gives life to the picture.
There is a thrill in watching the human salvage
work move upward, take a sudden dip, progress

slowly upward (with a hint of forboding) until
it reaches a still higher point, lapse again mo-
mentarily and more seriously, and finally straight-
en out at the close of the picture on a direct
course and a promise of complete success.
In analyzing this piece of dynamic rough-cast,
there is one point that is outstanding. Among
the details which the cinema is able to handle in
a more extended manner than the stage is three-
dimensional drama: fine nuances of psychological
motion exposed starkly in close-ups. "The Road
to Life" attempts to carry this ability to its com-
plete end; thus there are more close-ups than
over-all shots. Many of these close-ups are rele-

the moving volume of the story; the highly hu-
man personalities of shrewd Sergeyev, the or-
ganizer, and colorful and tragichMustapha, the
boy gang-leader; the life-like shots of boys in
action; the frankness of the propagandist-pro-
ducers in presenting the early weaknesses in the
movement. Defects: occasional incoherence;
mingling of impressionism with realism; too much
emphasis on singing; absurd minor inconsisten-
cies; the introduction of much irrelevance for the
sake of its neatness; ridiculous time-wasting sub-
titles.
-John W. Pritchard
S - -- ~
Art Reviews
KRAMER EXHIBITION
AT LEAGUE
I)UE to the popular reception of Albert John
Kramer's collection of water-colors at the
showing at the Art Exchange last week, a few of
the favorites are being continued this week.
Mr. Kramer, a former decorative design stu-
dent in the College of Architecture, shows an
impressionistic handling of a difficult median.
His palette is extensive; he uses a wealth of rich
reds, striking blues, brilliant yellows, and lovely
combinations of these hues. Each color scheme
is perfectly appropriate for the scene portrayed;
cool, restful tones, harmoniously blended, depict-
ing country spots; dashing, vivid colors show all
manner of fruits, flowers, and draperies.
Besides examples from life, there is a collection
of beautiful still-lifes. Of these, the flowers are
outstanding. The artist has a faculty of making
them extremely alive by mere contrast of lights
and darks.
Albert Kramer is a product of the University
of Michigan, having studied here from 1930-1933.
The amazing fact of this exhibition is that it
is the result of an extremely short perod, work
accomplished last year under the tutorage of Jean
Paul Slusser. Some of his beautiful country land-
scapes were created this summer when he travelled
with Professor Slusser through New England.
Kramer is unquestionably an impressionist. The
observer is not confused by minute detail, but
rather receives the impression of simplicity. His
technique is ]:old, free, and decidedly masculine.
-E. M. N.
About Books

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Ciussl fled Ad vert;Ing Departmnit.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to daty of insert1li.
l~ox N, Gibersnuy be seured at no
extra tcharge.
la sii In Advance -11c per reading ln<te
(on basis; of I vt; averag~e word-, to
line) for onle or two in::rrtliis.
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insertions.
Minirmm three lines pei- insertion.
Telephone Rate-15c per readting line for
onie or two inrtio ns.
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Insertilons.
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By (OIE.rw., per-)le'Z L('i; daily, (u-
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The above rates are per readlzig lie,
baed on eIght reaiang lines per Inch u
72 poit;. Jouic type, uppe' atd lwer
ease Add^GC per lne to above rate; ior
fill capital lettters;. Aidd Gic'per Hi-ir h
a bov~e for bold fare, nuliper atiid ihwt-r
Cs. Add 10 per Hlnetuov#- r) ,b, f,,r
bold lace caitalltters.~n"
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x

WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4. 5, 6 and 7 dol-
lirs. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
c:Ago B~uyers:. Temporary office. 200
North Main. 5x
FOR SALE
PACKARD sedan for sale cheap. Call
I l 318 Earst Jefferson after 5 p.mn.
Suitatblc for boys driving hiome.
411
NOTICE
RETURN TRIP to Philadelphia.
Women or men. $13. Call 3155.
AUTO LOANS AND REFINANC1TNG
lirinu your title
As:;oci.alted Motor Services, Inc
311 W. h1uron, Ph. 2-2001
12x
A RE YOU GOING HOME?
hidi n Trail Stages
of'fers low rates
Call Milnel' Hotel. 329:3
405
LOST AND FOUND
WILL GIRL who took wrong white
gloves at D. U. formal please call

LOST: Left half of pair of Oxford
glasses. If found, call 2-1156.
LADIES' white gold wrist watch and
bracelet on or near Michigan The-
atre Sunday night. Reward. Phone
7331. 417
LOST: Green Eversharp pen last
Thursday p.m. Reward if returned
to F.B.S. Daily Office. 413
TAXICABS
TAXI - Phone 9000, Seven-passenger
cars. Only standard rates. Ix
ARCADE CAB. Dial 6116. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates. 2x
PRI NTING
PRCESm 1THAT W1TJ PIEASE YOUI
THE ATHENS PRESS
Downtown -- 206 North Main St.
Dial 2-1013 Ne\t to Downtown Postofftie
TypewritingPaperat.kedtced Prices
FUR COATS made up, re-
paired, clea ned, stored, or
remodelled into Jacquettes,
Capes, etc.
E. L. GREENBAUM
448 Spring St. Phone 9625

FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Four room
apartment, first floor;
fireplace. Ingallside, 209

2-3281-257, 418 M----. -- -------.--_ -

r"

. . ..-.. Y ' . . ".
- ...

furnished
Frigidaire,
N. Ingalls.

r

MUSIC STUDENT: Room withl piao
for l ent. Call Kasle. 5613. 412
WANTED
WANTED: Passengers to Phila-
delphia or vicinity; leaving 1riday,
Call 5033. 409
DRIVING to Somerset, Ky., April 7,
via Lexington and returning April
14. Have room for 2 students, share
expenses. Dial 6364 after 6:30.
416
WANTED: Careful driver wishes to
rent car for part or all of vacation
for local use. Call Bourland, 7617.
415

Ann Arbor' Largest estaurant - Establshed 1899
wV.1-1 i be serov ingduig aation
Dacng Il)heresumed

11

it

Sunda April 15

AMONG THE LOST PEOPLE, by Conrad Aiken:
Scribner's (1934) $2.25. A Review:
By THEODORE HORNBERGER
"' MONG THE LOST PEOPLE" is a collection
of 12 short stories, presumably Mr. Aiken's
best efforts in that kind since 1928, when he pub-
lished "Costumes by Eros." It is not, I think, a
book which will enhance Mr. Aiken's reputation
as a writer of short fiction.
'Three of the stories are unusual. "Bow Down,
Isaac" is an interesting but not very powerful
tale about a drink-impoverished New England
farmer and the wife and daughter whom he drives
insane. "Mr. Arcularis" is a. genuine thriller
which Mr. Aiken spoils, for me at least, by a
sophomoric ending. "Silent Snow, Secret Snow"
is described in the blurb as "a breathlessly beau-
tiful study of the thoughts of adolescence." If I
understand it, it is actually an attempt to portray
the arrival of dementia praecox from a subjective
viewpoint.
The other nine stories in the book are largely
in Mr. Aiken's earlier manner; that is to say,
they deal with the pathos which Mr. Aiken finds
in the "lost" people who seek for beauty or sin-
cerity or something (it is not clear just what) in
a hard-drinking, loose-living society. Most of the
tales are concerned with moments when the ro-
mantic soul, usually self-analytic and passive,
discovers that reality does not lie in too many
cocktails, or in seduction, or in the other amuse-
ments with which these characters occupy them-
selves. The general effect is to suggest that it
is a pity (a) that life is so sordid, (b) that the
evanescent moments of beauty (i.e., love at first
sight, the first sip of Benedictine, inter-stellar
dream-trips, etc.) are so rare, and (c) that the
individual has so little really to hang on to in
this world. All this is no doubt pitiable, but it
also suggests that it is a pity that Mr. Aiken's
range is so limited. He has told the same story
that he told six years ago. Surely even these
people must have changed somewhat during the
yea's 1928-1934.
I do not mean to say that Mr. Aiken's stories
are not interesting. His writing is workmanlike,
and in detail is usually delightful. He deals with
subtleties of feeling and human relationship that
are the stuff of fiction. His wistful, pathetic
characters, who find that experience and drunk-
enness are equally as unexciting as innocence and
sobriety, are real enough to hurt. Students will
particularly enjoy the college types of "Pure as
the Driven Snow" and "No, No, Go Not to Lethe,"
But it seems to me very doubtful that the stories
of "Among the Lost People" will warrant re
reading.

. y..r. : 4 " -.-. i. A. '. I,.Jw . y..A . ...s .w ,.w ..... _ . .+ -.v-.dam

I]

- - __
l __

AL

HILL AUDITORIUM

Wednesday Evening, May 9

ROSA PONSEL LE ...... . .
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK...........................
Thursday Eveming, May 10

Soprano
Conductor

I

THE "SEASONS". . . .Iladyn
JEANNETTE VREELAND . ......Soprano
PAUL ALTHOUSE . .Tenor
C H A S E B A R O M E O -. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --. .a s s
PALMER CHRISTIAN ..Orga.. .st
MISCHA LEVITZKI .......Piattist
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK..............Conductors
Friday Afternoon, May 11
GUILA BUSTABO ..-. . . Violuiist
"H-c UGLY DUCKLING" Gra..ille English
BY THE WATERS OF BABYLON Loer
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS -- THE STANLEY CHORUS
ORCHEST RAL ACCOMPANIMENT
ERIC DELAMARTER and JUVA HIGREEConducors
Friday Evening, May 11

LI JICPI7ZtAG ORI

Soprano

I

Collegiate Observer
A course in horseshoe pitching has been offered
at Los Angeles Junior College. Credit is given
for the course by the physical education depart-
ment and the students are promised a strenuous
season of tournaments with other schools and
clubs. We wonder how many ringers will bet
needed for a Varsity letter?
Says a University of Southern California
columnist: Sitting Bull had a dog. . he was
a setter.
* *

FIR DERICK S I OCK ......................C.d....... ....Cndct
Saturday Af ernoon, May 12
«NINTII SYMPI-IONY".. Beethovn
JEANETTE VREELAND------------------Soprano
COE GLADE ....Contralto
ARTHUR HACKETT---------T-------. ...enor
THEODORE WEBB . . . . .Bartone
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
FREDERICK STOCK.....................................Conductor
Saturday Evening, May 12
"A SONG OF PEACE" (Ein Friedenslied)----------- - . . Heger
J EANETTE VREELAND . ........................Soprano
CO E GLAD E -........ ............ . ......... ... .Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE.................................... . .Tenor
CHASE BAROMEO . .......... . . ..... . Bass
PALMER CHRISTIAN :.....Organist
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION

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