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April 04, 1934 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-04

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THTEMICHIGANDAILY

]HIGAN DAILYI

I'l

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leavened her performance, bringing out qualities
of tone, or suggested moods. Not only has she
assimilated the technique of her violin, but she
has assimilated the feeling for what she is play-
ing, the result being a complete performance.
The most satisfactory work of the accompanist,
Raymond Kondratowicz, cannot be relegated to
mention in the last paragraph, for this pianist
proves adaptable. withal positive and imagina-
tive. There was a nice blending between the
two instruments, a friendliness between the per-
formers in the common interest, which contrib-
uted to the pleasure in the recital.
Beginning with the ever entrancing Franck
Sonata Mrs. Leslie and Mr. Kondratowicz demon-
strated the co-operation of their performance, as
well as their independence as soloists, in a ma-
ture approach, so that the lilt, the depth, the pure
melodiousness of the Sonata appeared in all their
beauty. Mrs. Leslie's "Largo and Allegro Assai"
from a Bach sonata, particularly indicate her ca-
pacity for drawing contrasts. Schubert's "The
Bee" and "Chanson Triste," by Kalinnikow pro-
vided a pair of sketches, opposing in nature, both
delicately executed. Mrs. Leslie has a graciousness
in melodic passages, and dexterity in the speedy;
a creativeness in climaxes; and a sensitiveness to
color and rhythm, as in the Lalo "Symphony
Espagnole."

oimL-:k 7s- sww w- - ---
Published every morning except Monday during the
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and the Big Ten News Service.
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1933 tN iNl cKvG i 934i
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Mustard, Betty Simonds.
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Hiardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
NIGHT EDITOR: GEORGE VAN VLECK

National Lobbies And
A Weakened Senate . .

.0

T HE SENATE, by its pusillanimous
action in concurring with the House
to override the Independent Offices Bill -contain-'
ing the veterans' relief provisions, has once again
acted counter to the principle on which it was
founded.
Conceived by the framers of the constitution
as a check upon the more democratic house, and
to be apart from and above the passions of the
hour, the Senate has proved its amenability ,to
current passions by submitting to the pressure of
a veterans lobby which' promised "the helpful
support .of opposition of strongly organized mi-
norities in approaching elections."
Without regard to the ultimate effects of this
flagrant rebuke to the president or to the value
or harm of the measure in question, the whole
incident presents an indictment of the high-pow-
ered lobbies and presents a commentary on the
altered status of the Senate.
Musical Events
GRADUATE ORGAN RECITAL
THIS AFTERNOON
Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C......Bach
Fantasie in A....................Franck
Mater Dolorosq sa (from
Symphony for Organ) ............... Weitz
Prelude from Suite Op. 14.. .....Mailengrau
Landscape in Mist (Sven Pastels from
Lake of Constance)..........Karg-Elert
Finale (Symphony, No.-8) ...........Widor
KATHERINE FUNKHAUSER will give her
graduation organ recital, this afternoon at
Hill Auditorium, in place of the regular weekly
Twilight Recital. Miss Funkhauser has worked
but an excellent program,; that has much color
and interest and contrast between its individual
numbers. The four names that appear promi-
nently in organ literature Bach, Franck, Karg-
Elert, and Widor, are here represented with typi-
cal works. Weitz is the organist at Westminster
Cathedral in London; the feature of his symphony
is that the movements are named after traditional
Latin hymn-tunes. Paul de Meilengrau writes
music of an intellectual type, with no bowing to
popular appeal. This prelude is seldom used in
student recitals.
VIOLIN GRADUATION RECITAL
A REVIEW

About Books
FOUR SAINTS IN THREE ACTS: An Opera to
be Sung, by Gertrude Stein. New York: Ran-
dom House (1934). $1.-A Review.
By CARL E. W. L. DAHLSTROM
(Assistant Professor of English)
THIS REVIEW of Gertrude Stein's "Four Saints
in Three Acts" is an obbligato to sinusitis.
The association, as anyone will readily grant, is
a happy one, for the "strange and baffling prose
cadences" of the one harnonize perfectly with
the familiar throbbings of the other.
"Four Saints" is a puree of dadaism, which in
turn is a puree of expressionism, which in its pro-
per turn is likewise a puree of objecto-subjectiv-
ism. For some readers, this may be a little diffi-
cult to grasp; but, as Oswald Spengler frequently
reminds us, "either you understand this or you
don't." "Die eine Seele erlauscht das Welterlebnis
in As-Dur, die andere in F-Moll; die eine empfin-
det es euklidisch, die zweite kontrapunktisch, die
dritte magisch": and for Gertrude Stein's soul the
world is sublimated dadaism. Thus "Four Saints"
is solely for the initiate. One should not even
attempt to open the covers unless he could read,
for example, Rudolph Blumner's absolute poetry
and understand every word of it.
Even a reviewer should pay sufficient homage to
literary aesthetics to observe the objective repre-
sentation of the rhythmized prime elements; to
wit, situation, plot, theme, character, setting. To
omit this analysis of "Four Saints" would be an
aesthetic misdemeanor, inasmuch as Gertrude
Stein has provided the open sesame to lallation
with the consequent inhalation of essence and
comprehension of the sensible world. Paradoxi-
cal as it may seem, we shall proceed to examine
the structure of a structureless work.
I. Situation. In "Four Saints" the conflict is
particularized in the opposition of hylotheistics
and theanthropics (limned by characters, their
doubles, and vestiges). The situation is universal
in aspect, of course, inasmuch as it is generalized
into the polarity of stuff and soul.
2. Plot. While there is nothing esoteric about
the situation, the plot - the rhythmic develop-
ment of the situation in a given direction -is so
tortuous, sinuous, attenuated, and variegated that
only an expert in the field could hope to move
with certainty through the labyrinthic maze. I
speak ex cathedra, however, as I point to the fol-
lowing divisions: (a) The praeludium (pp.xvi-xxii)
furnishes a broad example of urishness in dada-
istic development of plot, for gluteus maximus
is revealed as tormented by steatopygia (this ac-
tion is carried on without employment of voice
or instrument or pantomimic device before the
raising of the curtain); (b) the pre-exposition
(pp.5-10) by Nimbus-wearer Vechten is self-evi-
dent; (c) the exposition proper (pp.15-21) repre-
sents a sinistral approach to those early chapters
in the life of Gertrude Stein prior to the time that
the authoress encountered her doubles, their im-
ages, and the contemporary saints and their im-
ages; (d) the complication is carried on from
page 21 to the incomparable Lucy Lily lines of
page 47; (e) the climax is attained in the sym-
bolic transition from pigeons to magpies (pp.47-
9); (f) the denouement is found in the act of
the third act, and in the first scene of Act IV;
and (g) the postludium (pp.60-6) represents the
inner reality, gluteus maximus, prepared to en-
dure the outer reality, steatopygia at fifty.
The reader must be warned that to see the plot
as rhythmic structure he must peer through the
lines of "Four Saints" as he studies the scores
of a symphony.' A dozen readings of the text on
page 40 will help to place the reader in the
proper mood.
3. Theme. Throughout "Four Saints" one will
fail to discover a proposition, or theme, formu-
lated. It is perfectly clear to those of us who
understand Gertrude Stein, however, that the
theme is built up of letters taken from certain
pages. Reconstructed, it reads as follows: "Atha-
nah Yishaq-lo!"
4. Character. In dadaistic works, all charac-
ters emanate from the artist conceived as urman-
urwoman. In "Four Saints," the characters rep-
resent the ursoul of the authoress, or St. Therese
I, and the urbody of the same, or St. Therese II,
and their masculine variants. All are born of
the ursoul-urbody conflict of the urartist. The
apparent inconcinnities will vanish if the reader
will take pains to get this concept of character

clearly in mind.
5. Setting. This is very simple, although, nat-
urally enough, one must disregard that which is
set forth by Gertrude Stein and Carl Van Vech-
ten. Apprehended lallationally, the setting may
be described in terms of a house constructed with
external walls of transparent glass and inner par-
titions of mirrors. Only with such a material
enstaerpment rn c1l this rama hprmnm Pwhat it

Screen Reflections
AT THE WHITNEY
DOUBLE FEATURE
"OFFICER 13"
"SATURDAY'S MILLIONS"
For the last times today, the Whitney Theatre
is offering a mixed bill of entertainment, parts of
which cannot fail to please most of its patrons.
"Officer 13" is being shown here for the first
time, whereas, "Saturday's Millions" is a second
run. Therefore my comments will for the greater
part be confined to the former.
I have purposely not attempted to rate "Officer
13" by our usual system of stars because I feel
it would not do the picture justice. This film
will not be liked by students or the faculty. To
these elements it will appear silly, emotionally
childish and exaggerated. "But it must be remem-
bered that the film Was not produced for these
elements. It was made to entertain what we of
the movie trade call "the family trade." This
means that it has something in it which each
member of a family might enjoy, but which taken
as a whole and analyzed intelligently amounts to
a concoction of sentimentalized drible and ar-
tificial and labored excitement.
Monte Blue as "Officer 13" undertakes to bring
to justice the gambler murderer of his brother
officer. Lila Lee is forced by her conscience to
repudiate her false testimony after visiting the
heartbroken mother and child of the dead officer.
The criminal is, of course, brought to his just
deserts in the end. Intertwined in this plot are
all the types calculated to pull at the average
citizen's heartstrings: the orphaned child, the
tear-stained mother, the virtuous motorcycle of-
ficer, and the repentant, conscience-stricken hero-
ine. Townspeople of the less intelligent sort will
no doubt get some amount of enjoyment out of
it, but we may as well admit that such obvious,
unconcealed pretenses at human interest would
be snickered upon by our more sophisticated -
to be frank - tastes.
"Saturday's Millions" has many genuinely dra-
matic moments in it in addition to much comedy
and much misinformation with regard to college
football. But it is a story, and should be taken
only as such. Robert Young contributes a good
piece of characterization, as do Andy Devine and
Grant Mitchell.
-J. C,S,
"ROAD TO LIFE"
BEGINS TONIGHT
The Art Cinema League is presenting tonight
and for the following two nights the "Road to
Life" at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Prof.
John Dewey, eminent American philosopher and
educator, in introducing the film on the screen,
calls it a "historical and dramatic document of
Soviet Russia." The picture tells the story of the
reclamation of the "wild children" who were Rus-
sia's heritage of the war and famine. The experi-
ment of allowing these young savages to work out
their own salvation by self-government and sym-
pathetic guidance in learning a trade is shown by
a series of dramatic incidents which are faithful
to the facts.
Nikolai Ekk, the director, has produced the life
of these "wild children" in accurate detail. They
came back from their schools and were given their
old rags and sheepskins. Their ferocious appear-
ance in the early scenes of the picture is 'thus
authentic. The raid on their sleeping quarters in
an abandoned cellar is the record of a real round-
up of the "wild boys" Dec. 20, 1923.
One of the charming features of the "Road to
Life" is the use of Russian songs - folk songs
of the past, and the dynamic, thrilling working
songs of New Russia. Many of these are sung
by the boys themselves. In one scene they sing
the haunting "Bezprizornie Song," which became
a sort of "national anthem" of the "wild chil-
dren"
I was left an orphan
Forgotten, alone.
A hcild among strangers,
I have no home.
I was left to wander,
I inherit sorrow,
No one will grieve for me,
If I die tomorrow.
I will lie forgotten
In the fresh spring.

Over my unknown grave
Little birds will sing.
But they were not forgotten. Their rebirth is the
subject dramatized in this film.
Art Cinema League officials wish to advise their
public that this is the last film they will exhibit
this year. They would appreciate suggestions
handed into the box office any night of the show
which will aid them in making up their schedule
for next year. There will be two shows each night,
the first at 7:15 p.m. and the second at 9:15'pm.,
but the shows will be continuous and the public
will be permitted to enter whenever they like. In
addition to the feature film will be presented
"Noah's Ark," a Walt Disney cartoon, and a "Bat-
tle For Life," short No. 3.
-J.C. S.
Koledges are skools ware one tenth of the stew-
dents go 2 akwire noledge & the other nine tenths
go 2 tell the teachers a few things abowt wats
wat.
Ther are several cowrses at Koledge such as
football, gud times, etikette, and noledge. Nobody
ever gradewated from the last one with onors.
The football cowrse incloods lessens 4 girls in
how to akt at the gaims, such as never akt inteli-
gent. The fellows not on the teem find this
cowrse very helpful in explaneing how they cood
have made the touchdown. The gud times cowrse
has the most starr pewpils 4 obvious reesons.
-DePaulia Weekly
of Gertrude Stein's felicities. Her lallations are
frequently superb. At the same time, however, she
has not yet reached the sublime heights of a
Rudolph Blumner; and she will have to go far
+o rannhth a actaen +f vanTTnmha'c nietrieh"when

Before
April
$4..50

After
April 6
$5.00

4-

Make Second and Third Payments
at the Pub lications Buildinig NOW

IIwo1
__________ s
El ~i fl

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WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY

HILL AUDITORIUM

1"", w

' - - --- lint

Wednesday Evening, May 9
ROSA PONSELLE ......,.. . ..... Soprano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK. . .. . . .... Conductor
Thursday Evening, May 10
THE "SEASONS". . ..........Hadyn
JEANNETTE VREELAND Soprano
PAUL ALTHOUSE ..... . . . ..... . Tenor
CHASE BAROMEO ...... ... . . ....... Bass
PALMER CHRISTIAN .. . . . . ... .. . . . . .Organist
MISCHA LEVITZKI... . . Pianist
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK .Conductors
Friday Afternoon, May 11
GUILA BUSTABO . Violinist
"THE UGLY DUCKLING" Granville English
BY THE WATERS OF BABYLON . .... Loeffler
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS - THE STANLEY CHORUS
ORCHESTRAL ACCOMPANIMENT
ERIC DELAMARTER and JUVA HIGBEE ....Conductors
Friday Evening, May 11
LUCREZIA BORI . ..... ... . ..Soprano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK ..... . ........... Conductor
Saturday Afternoon, May 12
"NINTH SYMPHONY" Beethoven
JEANETTE VREELAND Soprano
COE GLADE ... . .. Contralto
ARTHUR HACKETT .... Tenor
THEODORE WEBB Baritone
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
FREDERICK STOCK . . .................,Conductor

Saturday Evening, May 12
"A SONG OF PEACE" (Em Friedenslied) Heger
JEANETTE VREELAND ...Soprano
COE GLADE .. .... . .......Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE .............Tenor
CHASE BAROMEO B . . . . ........ .Bass
PALMER CHRISTIAN . Organist
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE .. .. . . .. ..Conductor

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