100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 03, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TTHE MICHIG.AN I)AILY

N DAILY

-_r

PubWi hed every morning except - Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publioations.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
cioated o+dltiatt rtzz
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
'The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
fol' republication of all news dispathees credlted to it or
not otherwise credited in thi paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.,
Entered at the ) ost Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
'Third AS~istant Postmastfer-General.
8i'Ilscriltion during sumnmer by. carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular sehool year by carrier, $.75; y
mal, $4.25.
Ofllces: Stuient Pubilcat.ns Building, Maynard Street,
Anna Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Pi bications Representatives,
Inc., 4GNast Thirty-^ourth Street, Newh or City; 80
Boylson Street, floston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.FF
:telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR..........THOMAS KCONNELLAN
EIDITORIALDIRECTOR.... ..C. HART SCHAAP
CITY EDITOR............ .... ..BAACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR... ............. ALBERT Hl. NEWMAN
DRAMA EDITOR...............JOHN W. PRITCHARD
WOMEN'S EDIT'OR.....................CAROL .1. HANAN
INIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Bali, Ralph G. Coulter, Wiliam
0. Ferris, John C. Healey, George Van V leek, Guy M,
Whipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: :Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomua A..Groehn,
John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
G. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Anwitch,
Arthur S. Settle. John C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub.
Dorothy Ge", Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnon, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schnelder.
BUSINESS STAFP
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREIT MANAGER .........BERNARD E. SCIfHNACKET
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER
..................CATHARINE MOCHENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Class'fied Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; Accounts,, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
tion andi Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
entihal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
VIrginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevlevu Field, Louise
D'lore2, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Bille Grifflths, Janet.
Jaucsron, Louliie Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simnonadr.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Lois Gold-
smith, David Schiffar, WilliaM Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avncr, Kronenberger, Jim loriskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Levin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittinan, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Ilardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.

be bad literature for the band to attempt, not
that it was badly played but that it can not be
played to best advantage in the absence of string'
color.
The distinct hit of the evening was the "Hun-
garian Fantasy." In this Joseph Brinkman, Leon-
ard Falcone, and the Varsity band combined their'
talents, to make a very colorful performance. In
word of praise to N. Falcone, who is sick in New
York, may we say that the Fantasy as arranged
for band by him did not suffer when compared to
thy original treatment for orchestra. Nor can we
be too lavish in our praise of Mr. Brinkman who
gave a faultless interpretation, as he has done
many times before. This work which proved to
be the best received on the program, needed com-
plete co-operation between soloist, conductor and
band, and most important is the fact that it re-
ceived it. Mr. Falcone's direction was faultless,
and at all times achieved the effect that he was
after. Thanks again to Mr. Brinkman and to
Leonard Falcone and the band for the fine per-
formance,
_W. B.
SUNDAY AFTERNOON Mrs. Mabel Ross Rhead
and the University Symphony orchestra pre-
sented a program which combined the brilliance,
intensity, and glorious peace associated with the
Easter season. Constant solor variety and rapid
alterations of mood so prominent in Rimsky-Kor-
sakow's "Russian Easter" met a sharp contrast
in the intensity and, sustained quality of the Par-
sifal "Prelude." The University symphony or-
chestra played the "Russian Easter" excellently.
Mr. Moore received all the co-operation he could
have wished for.
The Wagner music was not as successful. The
orchestra allowed the prelude to become chopped
up so that thle music seemed to "sag" instead of
sustaining, the emotional pitch which is so neces-
sary for powerful effect.
Mrs. Rhead and the orchestra played as the
conclusionto the concert the difficult Tschaikow-
sky "B-Flat Minor Piano Concerto." Mrs. Rhead's
forceful, playing combined with the strength of
the orchestra resulted in a very effective inter-
pretation. The first two movements, both marked
allegro, were played without pause. The brilliance
f these movements almost labels them Liszt. The
beautiful andantino semplice which follows was
one of the climaxes of the concert. The simple
lyricism of this movement, placed between the
loud, splendid, and exciting introductory and con-
cluding passages, demands a great change in the
artist's interpretation. Mrs. Rhead caie so nat-
urally and swiftly down to this andantino that
it became a true climax. The allegro con fuoco
which follows the andantino brought the concerto
to a tremendous conclusion.
The interesting program, the playing of the or-
chestra, and the excellent interpretation of Mrs.
Rhead all combined to make this one the most
successful faculty concerts of the year.
-W. P.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The names of communticants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to lass
than 300 words if possible.
"MURMURING MICHIGAN"
NOT FAIR TO CO-EDS
To the Editor:

As Others See It
A WORD FOR THE WEATHER
FORECASTERS
Believe it or not, the weather forecasters are
batting between .850 and .900, and that it a figure
god enough for any league. Dr. C. C. Clark, acting
chief of the United States Weather Bureau, says
so. It is ex parte testimony, and no doubt many of
the malcontents who are always throwing figura-
tive bricks at the forecaster would like to cross-
examine him. We, for one, are willing to let
it go at that. We have been known to mutter
on such occasions, for example, as when "fair and
warmer" turns up, as Mr. Shakespeare used to say,
in "thunder, lightning and in rain," but even Babe
Ruth strikes out, even Homer nodded and Napoleon
lived to witness Waterloo.
-St. Lonis Post-Dispatch
Screen Reflcti0ns
AT THE MICHIGAN
,qr "SPITFIRE"

Ne M
INCLUDING BIOGRAPHY, TR AVEL, POLITICS, ETC.
Re,(tilirly Priced from $2.50 lo

I

I

I

Now

SEVERAL HUNDRED VOLUMES OF

pei )look

11

WAHR'S BOOKSTORE

State Street

I

dams,
..:

1
i
i
1
1
i
+
3
1

Trigger ............. Katharine Hepurn
J. Stafford .............Robert Young
Q. Fleetwood ...........Ralph Bellamy
Etta Dawson .............. Sara Haden
"Spitfire" itself is not an exceptional picture,
but Katharine Hepburn's characterization over-
shadows its weak spots and makes it highly rec-
ommendable.. This young lady is difficult to speak
of, because she has a charm that is akin to Gar-
bo's, but she is by no means limited to that. She
is saturated with an ability and a versatility so
rare and remarkable that it makes one wonder
how high the greatest height is that such an
actress can achieve.
In "Spitfire" Hepburn is a strange young moun-
tain girl,; living alone in a cabin in the woods.
Her neighbros ostracize her because she has been
rumored to have the powers of a witch. Near her
cottage a dam is being built, and two of the men
in charge come into contact with her through her
escapades about the dam and because of her bat-
tles with her fellow mountaineers. Secretly she
prays for the health and well-being of her neigh-
bors, and she is so full of faith that she seems
to produce miraculous results. However, she gets
into trouble when she steals a baby in order to
nurse it to health.
The plot of this picture lacks a fullness and
completeness that would have made it a work of
art. There are sequences that are handled weak-
ly, and the subordinate characterizations are so
thin that their importance in the picture is some-
what confusing, because they are brought in and
dropped rather mechanically, and they are not
given the depth that is needed to round the. pic-
ture out.
This has been done, of course, to focus the
attention on Hepburn, and since it is Hepburn, it
is almost forgivable. If you have seen her in
"Christopher Strong," "Little Women," "Morn-
Glory," and any of her other pictures, you will
be able to appreciate her genuine sincerity as a
real actress of the most valuable sort. "Spitfire"
proves that she does not need clothes, back-
ground, or. eccentricity to bring her out. She is
simple, charming, and alive in anything she does.
A word should be said for Sara Haden's por-
trayal. As the ignorant, dumb mountain girl she
performs beautifully, and adds a contrast that is
effective in bringing out hepburn's characteriza-
tion. Robert Young and Ralph Bellamy are good
as far as it is allowed them, but their opportunities
are not as great as they could be.
-C.B. C.

G unipiii1pu joiiiper Hezziehees
April 'time we're gettII i anther
.Kip roariibut navvy ripe Wi rwissue o
. n .
G- argyeI ' lm 5(1
0i .y e th s s-a ve rw h elm iii Co n e to e s 's a [ l a 1
spend a
Yjell OP wso if lie's surlie theres a
Litebtween the covers, sides what
E eoild r'ead in a dirt sheet Or Wallyboo.

~4~

I

I

I

_ _- -- - x-1
. _- - - -

iA

_a

NIGHT EDITOR: WILLIAM G. FERRIS

-"meter

ir

Lm

Ian( ReviewI
Makes Its Appearance ...
U NOFFICIAL student publications
are usually short-lived; but a mag-
azine of a good deal of vision and solidity is cur-'
rently making its first appearance, and, at the'
same time, a strong bid for permanency. This is
The Inland Review, a literary quarterly, the con-
tents of which are divided between creative writ-
ing and critical opinion.
The title immediately suggests that of The
Inlander, existent on campus several years ago;
and, in fact The Inland Review is intended partly
to carry on the functions of its predecessor. The
present magazine, however, is in all respects in-
dependent of the defunct publication; it is not
a revival, but a new literary venture.
A university campus without a student literary
magazine is rather a sorry spectacle. This has
been the condition of the University of Michigan
for too long a while. All honor and success to
Editor Coon and his enterprise.
Musical Events
VIOLIN GRADUATION
RECITAL TONIGHT
Sonata for Piano and Violin . ... Franck
Allegretto ben moderato
Allegro
Recitativo-Fantasia
Allegretto poco mosso
Largo and Allegro Assai from Sonata
inF ........ ... ...........Bach
Air from Violin Concerto .... ....Goldmark
L'Abeille .. ..... ............. Schubert
Chanson Triste.. . . . . ....Kalinnikow
Perpetuum Mobile ................ Novacek
1ymphonie Espagnole................Lalo
Allegro non troppo
Andante
Allegro
Elizabeth Allsop Leslie is fortunate in the se-
lection of her program for it is colorful, violinistic,
the most of it having been written by violinsts,
full of melody and bright effects.
BAND CONCERT
IN REVIEW,
IF IT HAS not been proven heretofore that
Michigan has a capable concert band within
its folds, it was proven beyond doubt last night.

I am writing you to say that I am sorry youl
did not see fit, in your editorial on the article
"Murmuring Michigan" appearing in Saturday
Evening Post," to make mention of the very scur-
rilous manner in which the young women on the
Campus were written about. While it is not neces-
sarily your duty to defend them, still it would seem,
fitting and, suitable that any editorial appearing
should mention something about it, and I am
regretting that you did not, for this reply may go
to. places in answer to -the "Post" article, and
stand for the "come back" of the University.
As a former graduate living here for the time,
I am interested in the reputation and the action
of the University where I received so much. Al-,
though I was in the Medical Department where
we were obliged to work hard, I had many friends
who lived where I did, in the Alpha Phi House.
This was in 1898-1901, a long time ago. I have
followed the accounts of Michigan since, and can
recall many brilliant students among the girls
some of whom have made a name for themselves
and have been an honor to the University. I can
mention physicians of reputation all over the
country, and I know of them as I have been on
National Committees and have met many of them
at meetings of the A.M.A. and other scientific and
medical bodies, even abroad in time of the War
where they distinguished themselves. One gradu-
ate, Dr. Bertha VanHoesen, has a large part of
the largest hospital in Chicago; her clinics are
attended by medical students and I have heard
that she pays an income tax on over $1,000,000
all due to her own efforts. Others are prominent
and have large and important practises and posi-
tions. Dr. Eliza Mosher, the first Dean of Women,!
was prominent and respected in her Brooklyn
home. This is of course not the Department
criticized by the man writing in the "Post."
But, to picture the women of this University as
exhibiting themselves in "Hairpin curves" in a
dancing restaurant and to say little further ex-
cept to mention overdressing is to say the least
superficial, do you not think? I think the numer-
ous women filling teaching positions of impor-
tance upon graduation, the many married and
influential in their localities as leaders in edu-
cation and thought, should have been described
in the making here.
Then, too, the girls who have won the Hop-
wood prizes surely might have had some mention
as coming from the despised "Literary Depart-
ment." I recall the reputation made by a per-
sonal friend of mine in college, who wrote "The
Father" and won a large prize among many
other stories and novels printed in the best mag-
azines in the country for years-Katherine Hol-

HILL AUDITORIUM

Wednesday Evening, May 9

Collegiate Observer
During a politeness survey at the University of
Illinois, the question "Could you tell the correct
time?" was asked of girls from various sororities.
The following answers were received:
Alpha Chi - "We're fresh out."
A. D. Pi -"Time for you to hang up."
Alpha Phi -"Go jump in the lake."
Tri Delt -- "What do you think this is, Bulova
Watch?"
Kappa Delta - "Wot? I haven't the slightest
idea."
Kappa Alpha Theta--"All right, what's the
gag?"
Fifteen sororities gave the correct time.
Here's good advice to co-eds, coming from
one who knows at Ohio State University:
Never let a fool kiss you and never let a
kiss fool you.

ROSA PONSELLE .Srano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK .............................. Conductor
Thursday Evening, May 10

THE "SEASONS".
JEANNETTE VREELANID
PAUL ALTHOUSE.
CHASE BAROMEO.
PALMER CHRISTIAN
MLSCHA LEVITZKI . .
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK..... .

. .iadyti
Soprano
. Tenor
CnuBass
Organist
Conductors

Friday Afternoon, May 1
GUILA BUSTABO . . . . . ... . .....V.i ieist
"THE UGLY DUCKLING" . ........ ...Gr.avlil le English
BY THE WATERS OF BABYLON . Loefler
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS -- THE STANLEY CHORUS

11

The
ing to

chant of the Phi Beta Kappa, accord-
the Georgia Red and Black:
Great and small
Admire you;
But none at all
Will hire you.

ORCHESTRAL ACCOMPANIMENT.
ERIC DELAMARTER and JUVA HIGBEE.... . .
Friday Evening, May 11
LUCREZIA BORI
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK ............... .
Saturday Afterinoon, May 1

Conductors

Conductor

How's this for turning the tables. A professor
at Oklahoma A. & M. recently dropped a course.
His reason- - "This class is lousy."
Love is that emotion which make a young
man want to pay some girl's board bill when
he can't pay his own.
-Annapolis Log'
Nearly one-third of the women students at theI
University of Wisconsin go through four years
without having a single date. This situation is
blamed on an inadequate social program.
* * *
Here's a little advice coming from a co-ed
at the University of Maryland:
Young men who hang onto their dollars,
Find neck is only a place for collars.

"NINTH SYMPHONY" . . JleethvCn
JEANETTE VREELAND Soprano
COE GLADE ...,. .............. . .. Contralto
ARTHUR HACKETT.......Tenor
THEODORE WEBB ....Baritone
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
FREDERICK STOCK ...,..:......... Conductor
Saturday Evening, May 12
"A SONG OF PEACE" (Ein Friedenslied)e.....................Tger
JEANETTE VREELAND ... . ,....... ..Soprano
COE GLADE ....... . ............ Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE..... ......... ..........Tenor
CHASE BAROMEO . .. ... . .. ....... Bass
PALMER CHRISTIAN.......... Organist
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
I INIVERSITY CHORAL UNION

'''

E

I

a

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan