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February 16, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-02-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAILY

sion, and may very easily instill in you a respect
and liking for "politics," and kindred subjects.
Every student -from the one to whom Hitler
is "that German dictator guy" to the one who can
a accurately bound the Tadjikistan Socialist Soviet
Republic --should make these articles daily read-
I in, -renifred,

'x

Screen Reflections

'I

very seriously, and conducted herself in a dig-
nified, reserved manner, never smiling, though
she seemed to enjoy playing when the tasks of'
technical velocity were not occupying her atten-
tion. Her left hand moved over the keyboard like
a bunny before a hound.
Although the Maedchen can not be accused of
being sentimental, or introspective, it was a good
progran for her benefit. Perhaps what we need is
good shot of technicality, since this is thema-
chine age, in our music. Whatever Poldi Mildner
attempts, she does it in the grand manner and
with a young ardor. Her program put her, herself,
in a shadow; so much largesse is palling; never-
theless she's an engaging person on the stage and
a wizard at the keyboard. -S. P.
Campus Opinion

TFX.OKK

New and Used.

_ _
IE

AT THE MICHIGAN
"ALL OF ME"

**

MPublished every nmornng except Monday during the
Uiversityyear Pubdi ummernSession by tie Board in
Control of Student Publications,
Member of te Wstern Conference Editorial Association
arid the Bi1g Ten News Service.
ocitted doltgi*tte rtzs
. - -OE x l .C _
- 1033 (fTow ,i* .aAe 19 Int
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCTATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively untitled to the use
for republication of.all news dispathces credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
puplished herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the cost Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class ma~tter. Special rata of. postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. .)Dring regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc. 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4025
MANAGING EDITOR.......THOMAS K. CONNELLANJ
CITYE EDITOR..................BRACKLEY SHAWr
~EDITORIAL. DIRECTOR... ....C. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
DRAMA EDITOR...............JOHN W. PRITCHARD
WOMEN'S EDITOR,---................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferrs, John C. Healey, George van Veck, Guy M.
Whipple, Jr,

BARGAINS IN
BOOKS DAMAGED

USED BOOKS AND
BY THE RECENT FIRE.

Mr. Ellis ...............Frederic March
Leila .................. Miriam Hopkins
"Honey" ......... .......George Raft
Eve ........... .............Ruth Hall
This picture involves a rather commonplace type
of plot and had it not been for occasional good
acting by Mr. March and Miss Hopkins the picture
would be a complete Alop. Here and there one will
find an occasional remark, situation, or shot that
will please, but as a whole "All of Me" cannot
come up to the higher levels of cinema drama by
any stretch of the imagination.
A young instructor in a college seems to be in
love with one of his pupils, but can't persuade the
young lady to marry him ... spoil it all, y'know.
The experience of a young couple down in New
York's underworld is used to bring them around
to the fact that the young man was right in the
first place and the young lady was wrong, which
only goes to prove the fact that who is usually
right anyway? Best remark: Honey remarking,
when he has seen that Leila and Ellis are observ-
ing him, "Just a coupla mugs down to get a sniff
of life!" U. E. L.
AT THE LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
"CHINA EXPRESS"
"SOVIETS ON PARADE"
"PIED PIPER OF HAMLIN"

Everything for the Studeht at

S SSITANT: Charles A. Baird Arthur W. Car-
8 e, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie
Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS:Marjorie Bec, Eleanor Blum,
bcs Jotter, Mitarie 1Murpy, Margaret D. Phalan
RE'oR TES: C. Bradford Carpenter, Ogden G. Dwight,,
Pal J. ZlUott, Courtney A. Evans, Thomas E. Groehn,
John Ix r, Tomnas A. Kleene, Richard E. Lorch, David
Q Macdonald, Joel P. Newman, Kenneth Parkr, Wil..
liaMR. Reed, Robert S. Ruwth, Robert J St. Clar,
Arthur S. Settle, Marshall D. Silverman, Arthur M.
Taub.
lprthy Gies, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Marie
Rleid, Xleanar John n, Rth Loeb, Josephine McLean,
Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Kathryn
Rietdyk, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.........EW.GRAFTON SHARP
CRE I NGE . MANA GER....BERNARD E. SHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .....................
- -- -- -- -- -- -- -......... ... CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
tri a sClassi ied Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
0 ontiacts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Wro Accoints, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
r~lson.
ASSSTANTS:' Meigs B&arinessV Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-
Wer,John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rotbard,
James Scott, David Wnkworth.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell. Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
FlorKS, Doris Giminy, Betty Greve, Billie Qrfiths, Janet
'Jacson,, Loulse Krause, Barbara' Morgan, .Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonds
NIGHT EDITOR: WILLIAM G. FERRIS
g e e er.
' EVIVAL of the Annual Union Op-
erla this year brings back to the
MIchigan campus one of its mot famous and col-
orful events -- one that occupies a prominent
p e in the mmories of alumni who were here
dwing the 4 consecu ve years it was produced.
We feel sure that the Opera this year will be
so managd that all of the obj'ctions contributing
1 iMks 41scotinuaince in 1929 will be rectified.
Some of these were that it was too extravagant,
that it had gotten away from the original purpose
fOr W ch It was begun, that it has ceased to be
an all-student production, and that its local ap-
pep1 d teen negleced in the hope of making
it Wesemble a metropolitan show.
However, according to the statement of policy
de. by -those in hiarge, the step this year is to1
0e tirectly away from all these conditions. The
show will, have as large a cast; it will be of com-
paradle length; but it will be pointed at local
a udienes. All of the mechanical features of its
staing will e handled by students; extravagant1
scenes .and .costumes 'will be avoided; and it will
not attempt to approximate Broadway produc-
tins.
In short, the producers plan to put on a show
th~t, wiU go back to the "old days" when the
Qpera's only purpqse was entertainment. It will
pp fun for those who ,are in it and for those who
see it, and it will be a burlesque of current campus
affars.
This is going to be our own Opera. And under
the Papalme management of Stanley G. Waltz,
"anager of the Union, and Milton Peterson, di-'
rector, we ar' looking for a really enjoyable take-
off on the Michigan of 1934.
I1bIfuss1? Voroshilb.v!?
Never Heard Of 'Em!..,
I T MAY BE SAID without exaggera-
tion that it is the duty of every
student to inform himself in some way on the
p esent Europe , Eurp-Asiatic, Euro-American,
and domestic "situation." There are many ways
of woing about the serious business of gaining this.
There is little hope for the student to clarify him-
self on the very deep and very complex issues of
the 1934 wo rd through the columns of the daily
press; that is, at least, throgh the average news
story.
We comimend to you the series of articles now
running on the front page of The Daily. These
,rticles are being written by men who are vitally

Ilya Trauberg's choosing of types according to
the Eisenstein's code is reflected strongly in this
picture, but the foreign knack for unusual photog-
raphy overshines this quality considerably, as
does the excitement occurring in the plot.
Perhaps the outstanding feature of this pic-
ture is the fast-moving photog'raphy, entirely
new and original, cluttered with shots of astound-
ing appeal heaped one upon another in such rapid
succession that no one shot sticks in the observ-
er's mind. All of the shots when put together
with such care and composition leave a single
impression rounding into one conclusion; an en-
tirely new but satisfactory one. The casting fits
into this rapid photography as Trauberg has
chosen his huge cast with great care as each type
is cast for its use with accuracy that is seldom
seen in movies containing such a large number
of characters. The types are made prominent
outright and as they fill in their places as the
picture develops they become more and more
impressive, and thus are easy to recognize.
The plot is unique in that it takes place during
the passage of the China express from Nanking
to Soochow and all its strings are tied together in
a knot that is brought out to mean, what is going
to happen in China next? Aboard this train are
-a group of supposedly distinguished diplomats
(they are nothing but villains in the end) plotting
an alliance with a Chinese general; opposed by a
group of rebels riding in the "coolie" section of the
train. The way these two forces are brought to-
gether is done cleverly by the insertion of a family
episode which arouses our sympathy to the rebel's
side and is a good tool to show what sort of
thing China is putting up with now-a-days. As a
whole this picture will undoubtedly strike one as a
little out of the ordinary at the immediate finish
but a little careful thought and recollection will
soon bring one around to the fact that the Chi-
nese studios pave progressed considerably and
are without doubt approaching the sort of high-
class photography that the Russian and German
cinema is now producing and also that such cast-
ing and interest as aroused in this particular
selection of the Chinese cinema is in many ways
superb as well as unusual.
"Soviets On Parade" is a panorama of the
Russian Army of today, revealing its amazing size
and strength under its national "leader" stalin,
and much enthusiasm was accorded this bit of
fine photography with a cast of some 160-million
people. "Pied Piper of Hamlin" does not reach
the heights of its predecessor, "The Three Little
Pigs," as Disney has allowed sentiment to ,enter
in while depicting a nursery tale, but it is clev-
erly done in color with the usual Disney knack for
portraying more or less "cute" antics.
Musical Events
IXLDNER CONCERT
In Review
The superlatives of everyone's vocabulary have
been hauled out of storage and applied to Poldi
Mildner. Stupendous, prodigious, superb, marvel-
ous, unbelievable, such tone, such feeling and so
on and so on. They will do nicely, I think, such
a spilth of technical grandiosity from a Maedchen,
seventeen come Sunday (or whenever it was) is
remarkable, and is inescapable. It was always with
us, except in the charming Haydn, where the sim-
plicity, the vigor, the freshness, and unpreten-
tiousness was delicious and appropriate to the
Maedchen's feminine self, her own innocence and
freshness.
Her Teutonic determination to see the thing
through, with thoroughness and fervor, with
strength and conviction, is what made the bravura
numbers intelligible and which made a successful
contact with the admiring audience. The latter
was with her after she finished the Bach Prelude
and Fugue in D Major. Her confidence in herself
and what she was doing was youthful and ener-
getic; therefore the unconquerable enthusiasm and
impetuosity carried the long Schubert Wanderer
Fantasie (well-named) the Liszt Rhapsodie Es-
pagnole through the maze of technical lavishness
to their ultimate conclusions. There were spots

Letters published in this column should not be con-
sOrued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disrearded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re.
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, -confining themselves to less
than 300 words if possible.
REPLY OF THE
SECOND NOBLE KINSMAN
To the Editor-
Of course, the policies of Woodrow Wilson were
almost as confused as are the arguments of "A
Good American," who recently was dubbed
"No. 1", the surname probably having been
awarded by the Queen of the D.unciad for good
behavior under fire. The late president was a
dreamer and like most of his ilk he tended to lose
coherence. Dreamers are of vast importance; but
their policy should be given more attention than
their policies- the individual elements of tait
thought often conflict, but the resultant of the
oi.dosed forces in their nature is what is ii-
portant. Now, the policy of Wilson could not be
mistaken for anything other than one of interna-
tionalistic peace and prosperity, although his
methods were weak, and in at least one case dis-
astrous.
I feel that the R.O.T.C. has its good points, but
its emphasis is a wrong one. My statement is
based on two years of service on this campus: the
examiner forgot to look at my feet. Rather than
stressing the defensive angle of its purpose, the
R.O.T.C hints strongly in its curriculum that its
end is both defensive and offensive - with per-
haps greater empnasis being laid on the latter.
A country that will not defend itself if invaded is
spineless; but a nation which will invade another
on any pretext is vicious.
In medieval times the world was pestered by a
malignant disease known as feudalism. Unfortu-
nately, the world today is one glorified mass of
feudal states; reduced to lowest terms, it can be
called no more than that. There is, however, a
spreading leaven of internationalistic enlighten-
ment, which can result in salvation - if it is not
neutralized by "patriotic" emphasis upon arm-
ament.
I shduild like to be able to reply to "A Good
American's" letters point by point, but with ex-
aminations imminent, I haven't time to probe his
texts for the points which I am sure he must
have hidden therein. If he will assist me by
writing a letter in which hi points are clearly
stated, I shall be only too haippy to present my
angle to him.
I feel rather a proprietary interest in "A Good
American", and I am sorry I can't take his sug-
gestion that I return to Russia. I have never cared
for my fatherland since shaving became a national
institution there.
- The Second Noble Kinsman
Collegiate Observer
Af0 -2%

AHR

316 STATE STREET

I''I

DANEE

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

atthe

Ir

MICHIGAN

LEAGUE

SATURDAY

NIGHT

featuring

HAROLD

SI N DLES

BILL MARSHALL'S
ORCH ESTRA
Ross HARGER, directing

any.( the

QUAY

SI STERS

9-12

$1 00

THERE WILL BE NO DANCE FRIDAY

MMMWARMPMP

By BUD BERNARD
The newest thing in college subsidization
was uncovered recently when Duke University
and the University of Virginia protested the
eligibility of a piccolo player in the bandof
the University of North Carolina. It was
charged that the offending musician accepted
pay at a seaside resort last summer.
University of Missouri has finally solved the
ineligibility problem. Special classes are now be-
ing held for athletes only. They are intentionally
small and each man is given individual attention
of the professor who guarantees the man's future
eligibility.
The student who gives in when he's wrong
is wise, but the one who gives in whewx he's
right is a pledge.
The University of Washington is giving a course
in bluffing. It is given in conjunction with work in
the history and English departments.
Also at Westminster College a course in soap
sculpture has been added to the curriculum. What,
no course in apple-polishing?????
SO TIBEY SAY
A good womanis ppe who wants a ma to
realize her potentialities and then ignore
them.
* * * *
One of life's little ironies: Man spends hlbf
his time putting a woman on a pedestal and
the other half tempting her off.
* ' * *
Too many people mistake dirty-mindedness
for artistic temperament.
-Various College Exchanges.
During its early days Harvard University re-
quired students qualifying for a Bachelor of Arts
degree to translate the Bible from the original
into Latin.
* * * *
Correct posture week at Smith College means
that the young ladies have to carry their books on
their heads. Ingenious people, these authorities:
they are assured that for one week at least books
will be close to the students' brains.

Last Fridays-

JHOP

is now history.~

I

Its flicill-ory

i.
ISi u~t1Dr~

One colar will ly a

I

I_

and -otrgraph s
live forever . e.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

BUSINESS OFFICE

Student Publications Building

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