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March 29, 1934 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

...

Where University

Telescope's'Eye'

Will Be Poored

CLASSIFIED DIRECTO

EI

'1

-Associated Press Photo
Photo shows workmen at Corning, N. X., in the factcry wnhere an "eye" for the new University telescope
will be poured. They are handling a giant dipper to pour molten glass which will fc:m the lens for the tele-
scope that is expected to reveal vast, unexplored deaths of the universe.

Observatory Founded In
1926 For Research By
Micbigax: Professors
Few students realize that the sun
never sets on the possessions of the
University. For in far-off South
Africa, 9,000 miles from the campus,
lies a building which is the property.
of the University of Michigan. It is
an observatory, which for the past
eight years has been used for the
study of the hitherto uncharted
double stars of the southern hemi-
sphere.
Prof. William Hussey, director of
the Detroit Observatory in 1905, who
had always cherished the dream of
investigating the double stars in the
southern skies, founded the Observ-
atory in 1926 with the financial and
advisory aid of Robert Lamont, '91.
Professor Hussey died as the ex-
pedition to Africa was to begin, but
Dr. Richard A. Rossiter, Morris K.
Jessup, and Henry Donner carried on
to make important discoveries and
tabulations. At present the Lamont-
Hussey Observatory is running with
but two observers, Dr. Rossiter and
Mr. Donner. They hope to continue
observation for another year or two,
because it is expected that by that
time the survey of the Southern
Hemisphere double stars will be com-
plete.
Thanks to Hussey's dream and
Lamont's assistance, the University
of Michigan will have the honor, ac-
cording to Professor Heber D. Cur-
tis, director of the University Ob-
servatory in Ann Arbor, of the com-
pletion of a research which will stand
as authoritative in its field for cen-
turies to come.
Flint will speak on the theme "The
Divine Humiliation"; at the 2 o'clock
hour, Dr. F. B. Fisher will conclude
the service with a message on "The
Crucifixion."
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church:
Good Friday Three Hour Service, 12
noon to 3 o'clock. The Reverend
Henry Lewis will conduct these serv-
ices. Saturday - Holy Baptism four
p.m.

Cdifornia Seniors
Forget Textbooks
And Don Rompers
LOS ANGELES, March 28.- Mem-
bers of the senior class of the Uni-
versity of California at Los Angeles
held an informal get-together recent-
ly and apparently enjoyed themselves
just too much for words.
"Musical Chairs" was the first
round of the entertainment, and
caused screams of mirth to arise from
the 200 "grave old seniors" partici-
pating.
Anagrams was the next fascinat-
ing pursuit in which the class of
1934 engaged, followed immediately
by thrilling match of "hearts."
Bridge was at first discarded as
being too intellectual, but after in-
structing one of their classmates in
the rudiments of the game, three
sophisticates managed to play a few
rubbers.
Several co-eds sang for some time,
and the applause was very satisfac-
tory as the girls took their seats. Ice
cream and cake had been promised
to the merry collegians, but, a la
Frosh Frolic, failed to put in an ap-
pearance.
Thensenior class president was,
quoted as saying that "every one was
friendly and enthusiastic; I do hope
that, hereafter, the attendance at
these little affairs will be at least
twice as large."
e ihert Plans
Germany Trip m e
Thi Sumer
A trip to Germany will be made by!
Prof. Walter A. Reichert of the Ger-
man Department this summer; in
order to finish his study of Washing-
ton Irving's relation to Germany. Irv-
ing, the author of "Sketch Book" and
many other well known works, spent
almost a year of his life in Germany,
and it is the influences of this period,
both on Irving. and on Germany, that
the professor is investigating.
In 1930 before the present Nazi re-
gime, Professor Reichert studied the
works of Gerhart Hauptmann, Nobel
Prize winner and then Germany's
most outstanding dramatist. On this'
visit the professor studied in Siletia
at Hauptmanin's own private library.
Professor Reichert remarked that he
will view with especial interest the.
present political situation in Ger-
many.

P11
all Pofrani
For Triennial
Alu i Meeting
National Couvention. Will
Be Held June 1 And 2
In Grand Rapids
With the fourth national triennial
convention of University alumni def-
initely scheduled for Friday and Sat-
urday, June 1 and 2, in Grand Rap-
ids, a committee, acting in co-opera-
tion with local officials of the Alumni
Association and President Alexander
G. Ruthven, is making extensive
plans for the program of the meeting.
No one has as yet been selected to
deliver the principal address. In the
past several prominent university
presidents have spoken at the con-
vention, among them being former
President Clarence Cook Little of
Michigan, President Glenn Frank of
Wisconsin, President Lotus D. Coff-
man of Minnesota, and Former Presi-
dent Stratton D. Brooks of Oklahoma
and Missouri.
Will Consider Problems
It is said that much of the program
will concern itself largely with prob-
lems which affect vitally the alumni
in this state.
The plans call for registration Fri-
day morning with the initial session
scheduled for noon at luncheon. The
afternoon assembly will be concerned
with the problems to be discussed by
the terms of the conclave. The day's
activities will be climaxed with a
banquet in the evening.
The reunion features of the con-
vention will be a social session in the
grill room of the hotel following the.
banquet with an entertainment pro-
gram recruited both from the profes-
sional ranks and from among grad-
uates who took part in such campus
shows as the Opera, the Spotlight
Vodvil, Band Bounce, and other un-
dergraduate productions.
District Meetings Saturday
Meetings. on Saturday will probably
be largely the annual sessions of the
various districts represented. It is also
planned to have grill room luncheons
for special groups as well as for all
the attendant alumni. Further plans
for Saturday indicate that it will be
a day devoted to recreational activ-
ities, with a golf tournament at one
of the country clubs as the principal
item.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Phone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
Classified Advertising Department.
The classifie<l columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertions.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in Advance-11c per reading line
(on basis of fivb average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone Rate-15c per reading line for
one or two insertions.
14c per rending ilne for three or more
insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion,
Minimua three ines per insertion.
By Contract, per line-2 lines daily, one
month................. .....Sc
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months.......3c
2 lines daily, college year ......7c
4 lines E. 0. D., college year ....7c
100 lines used as desired ......9c
300 lines used as desired.......c
1,000 lines used as desired...7c
2.000 lines used as desired ..6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch of
7',l point Ionic type, upper and lower
case. Add 6c per line to above rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10 per line to above rates for
bold face capital letters.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
Business School Alumni
Plan Annual Conference
Preliminary plans for the sixth an-
nual Alumni Conference of the
School of Business Administration
will be discussed at a meeting of the
Detroit alumni of the school to be
held tonight at the University Club,
Detroit.
F. B. Case, '26BAd., of Detroit has
been named head of the committee in
charge of arrangements for the con-
ference, He will.be assisted by R. T.
Perring, '27BAd. anid Mary Narnell,
'30BAd. Plans for the organization of
the Detroit alumni group which in-
cludes more than 100 graduates of
the school will also be considered at
tonight's meeting.

NOTICE
AUTO LOANS AND REFINANCING
Bring your title
Associated Motor Services, Inc.
311 W. Huron, Ph. 2-2001
12x
WANTED
WANTED: Bids for 300 page manu-
script to be typed during Spring
Vacation. Triple copies. Apply Box
43. 403
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers, Temporary office. 200
North Main. ' 5x
TAXICABS
TAXI-Phone 9000. Seven-passenger
cars. Only standard rates. lx
ARCADE CAB. Dial 6116. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates. 2x
Says RO.T.C. Not
'Peace Promoting'
After watching undergraduate stu-
dents of the University of Minnesota
drilling in R.O.T.C. uniforms, Gen-
eral Joseph Haller, leader of the Pol-
ish armies in the World War, said
that he did not believe in compulsory
military training as a peace-promot-
ing measure.
"Military drill should not be re-
quired of students," General Haller
said. "It should be voluntary. It is
the volunteer who makes the best
soldier." Military training is offered
in academies and schools in his own
country, he stated, merely because
of the necessity of maintaining an
army against the ever-present threat
of invasion.
"Road To Life" is exceptional. It
is a rare and delightful experience
to see a picture about contemporary
problems which gives thought for
the adult min."
THERESA HeLBGuRN,
Director of the Theatre Guild

LIVE i FRENCH
Residential Summer School (co-educa-
tional) June 27-Aug. 1. Only French
spoken. Fee $150. Board and Tuition.
Elementary, Intermediate, Advanced.
Write for circular to Secretary, Residen-
il French Summer School
McGILL UNIVERSITY
Montreal, Canada

-I

READ THE DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADS

. __ . _. _._ ___ _r_

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4

--:ter

Mullion Saddle Stables
Fairgrounds
Horses and Cutters from the Ann Street Stables.
Large Bobs for Parties

i

Phone 7418

ii

-

IUOUS DAILY 1

n P.M...

r I

l

NOW Two Big Features!
JOHN PAT O'BRIEN
BARRYMORE EVELYN BRENT
"Counsellor "The World
at Law" Gone Mad"
1i

it

PLAY PRODUCTION and 'THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC
present
Gilbert and Sullivan's Comic Opera
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE - MARCH 29, 30, 31
Special Children's Matinee March 31
Box Office Open Daily 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. - Phone 6300 for Reservations
Price Scale: Evenings 50c, 75c, $1.00 - Matinee 25c, 35c, 50c, 75c

rE'LL

COLLECT

TOUR BAGGAGE
-take it home..and
bring it 6ack again

GARDENIAS

s:w

MICHIGAN Ends Today

4.

-- -____ ---------. I

11

I

Here is a simple time-saving sug-
gestion that will eliminate a lot
of unnecessary trouble and worry
for you. Send all your baggage,
trunks and personal belongings
home by Railway Express.
Wherever you may live, if it is
within regular vehicle limits,
Railway Express will call for your
trunks and bags and speed them
away on fast passenger trains
through to destination. You'll be
surprised how easy it is and how
quickly your trunks will be home.
Thousands of fellows-boys and
girls, too-have found Railway

Express service an economy not
to be sneezed at.
Then, after the holidays, send
your baggage back the same way
and Railway Express will handle
it swiftly, safely and promptly
direct to your fraternity house
or other residence.
Railway Express has served
your Alma Mater for many years.
It provides fast, dependable ser-
vice everywhere. For rates and
all necessary labels, merely tele-
phone the local Railway Express
office.

5,

',

SERVING THE NATION FOR 94 YEARS
A AY
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